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Lisa Glatt

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December 6, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
Andrew Wagner options Lisa Glatt's "A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That," a novel about a Long Beach woman who moves in with her dying mother and plunges into affairs with one man after another, desperately battling the uncertainties in her life. Glatt, whose novel was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times fiction award, is represented by Andrew Blauner on literary rights and by CAA for film rights; Wagner, who directed and co-wrote "Starting Out in the Evening," negotiates his own option deal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
Andrew Wagner options Lisa Glatt's "A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That," a novel about a Long Beach woman who moves in with her dying mother and plunges into affairs with one man after another, desperately battling the uncertainties in her life. Glatt, whose novel was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times fiction award, is represented by Andrew Blauner on literary rights and by CAA for film rights; Wagner, who directed and co-wrote "Starting Out in the Evening," negotiates his own option deal.
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BOOKS
June 5, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds
The Apple's Bruise Stories Lisa Glatt Simon & Schuster: 196 pp., $12 paper * A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That A Novel Lisa Glatt Simon & Schuster: 290 pp., $12 paper There's a quality to the best literary fiction that I've come to call "ominosity." It's not a writers' workshop thing, like tension or conflict, nor what you feel reading a thriller or a detective story. It's not a mere mood, like noir. It's bigger, deeper, like an earthquake.
NEWS
April 27, 2006 | Stevie Wilson
MENTION the phrase "L.A. writer," and chick lit might come to mind. In contrast, Lisa Glatt, a nationally acclaimed writer and poet, provides a more authentic, if somewhat bent, vision of Southern California. Her first book, 2004's "A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That," is a slightly autobiographical novel about a woman whose mother has breast cancer and how that affects her choices in life.
NEWS
April 27, 2006 | Stevie Wilson
MENTION the phrase "L.A. writer," and chick lit might come to mind. In contrast, Lisa Glatt, a nationally acclaimed writer and poet, provides a more authentic, if somewhat bent, vision of Southern California. Her first book, 2004's "A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That," is a slightly autobiographical novel about a woman whose mother has breast cancer and how that affects her choices in life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2004 | Scott Martelle
Robert Anderson Novelist/short-story writer Anderson takes a blurred-line approach in his first novel, "Little Fugue," about the ramifications of Sylvia Plath's suicide on her husband, Ted Hughes; his mistress, Assia Gutmann Wevill, who killed herself six years later; and a fictional Anderson's infatuation with Plath.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2005 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Darlene and Jimmy just got married. They're on a road trip across the West when Darlene turns to Jimmy and tells him he might think less of her if he knew about her past. Jimmy doesn't care what she's done. "I need to know what you're going to do. What we're going to do together," he tells Darlene in "Ludlow," a story by Lisa Glatt in "Women on the Edge," a new collection of short fiction by Los Angeles writers.
BOOKS
October 28, 2001
TODAY BRENTWOOD: Karen Scourby D'Arc reads "My Grandmother Is a Singing Yaya," Dutton's, 11975 San Vicente Blvd., 2 p.m. (310) 476-6263. LOS FELIZ: D.J. Waldie and Marissa Roth discuss their book, "Real City: Downtown Los Angeles Inside/Out," Skylight Books, 1818 N. Vermont Ave., 4 p.m. (323) 660-1175. MONTCLAIR: Lena Nozizwe signs "Starring in Your Own Life," Borders Books & Music, 5055 South Plaza Lane, 2 p.m. (909) 625-0424.
BOOKS
February 7, 1993 | Lee Rossi
While one count puts the current crop at near 40, here is a brief cross - section of literary magazines in Los Angeles. As Jack Grapes, editor of the L.A.-based literary magazine ONTHEBUS tells it, for too long L.A. writers have suffered from RDS, Rodney Dangerfield Syndrome. "We never got any respect," says Grapes. "I wanted to produce a literary magazine that would get respect."
BOOKS
August 15, 2004
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction LAST WEEK WEEKS ON LIST *--* *--* 1 Skinny Dip by Carl Hiaasen (Knopf: $24.95) A shady 2 3 Florida marine biologist thinks he's offed his wife, but she's only playing dead as she plots her revenge. 2 The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown (Doubleday: $24.95) A 4 72 Louvre curator's killing leads to clues hidden in Leonardo's paintings and a secret society with something to hide.
BOOKS
June 5, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds
The Apple's Bruise Stories Lisa Glatt Simon & Schuster: 196 pp., $12 paper * A Girl Becomes a Comma Like That A Novel Lisa Glatt Simon & Schuster: 290 pp., $12 paper There's a quality to the best literary fiction that I've come to call "ominosity." It's not a writers' workshop thing, like tension or conflict, nor what you feel reading a thriller or a detective story. It's not a mere mood, like noir. It's bigger, deeper, like an earthquake.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2005 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
When I was a kid, I considered it the height of luxury to lie on the couch in the living room with a stack of comic books and while away a summer afternoon. It's not that I was a comics geek; I just loved the idea of reading that wasn't, somehow, authorized. Back in the early 1970s, the term "graphic novel" hadn't been invented yet, and one of the appeals of comics was that they stood outside accepted culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2004 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
For decades, the challenge for Southern California writers hasn't been trying to fix the region on the page; the real test has been to circulate more representative ideas and images -- beyond L.A.'s borders and its easy cliches. But in the last few months, three handsome, homegrown literary journals, Black Clock, Swink and the Los Angeles Review, have made their debuts with high hopes of raising and sharpening the profile. To longtime participants and observers of L.A.'
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