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Lisa Jackson

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NATIONAL
December 27, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson said Thursday she was stepping down from the Cabinet-level post after four years in which she won new federal regulations for carbon dioxide emissions but also sparred often with Republican lawmakers and industry executives. The first African American to hold the position and a chemical engineer by training, Jackson gave no signal on what she planned to do next. But sources close to Jackson, 50, hinted that she might be headed back to her former home in New Jersey, either for a chance to become president of Princeton University or to run for governor.
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NATIONAL
September 7, 2013 | By Richard Simon
The capital is full of portraits of government officials, sometimes more than one of the same person. Elliot Richardson has four - one for each department he headed in the 1970s, including the Defense Department, where he was secretary for just four months. Donald H. Rumsfeld has two on display at the Pentagon, one for each of his stints as Defense secretary. Scores of others - Cabinet members, congressional leaders, heads of agencies such as NASA and the National Science Foundation and military leaders - are immortalized in oil paintings, an enduring tradition that has become part of the nation's historical record.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Paula Deen's Southern cooking empire may be in serious jeopardy, but her legal woes at least are behind her. On Monday,  U.S. District Judge William T. Moore Jr. approved a deal to dismiss a civil lawsuit filed by former employee Lisa Jackson accusing the celebrity chef and her brother, Bubba Hiers, of racial discrimination and sexual harassment. The settlement was reached "without any award of costs or fees to any party," according to a document filed in the U.S. District Court in Savannah, Ga. It's the latest wrinkle in a saga that began in May, when Deen admitted under oath in a deposition to having used the N-word in the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Paula Deen's Southern cooking empire may be in serious jeopardy, but her legal woes at least are behind her. On Monday,  U.S. District Judge William T. Moore Jr. approved a deal to dismiss a civil lawsuit filed by former employee Lisa Jackson accusing the celebrity chef and her brother, Bubba Hiers, of racial discrimination and sexual harassment. The settlement was reached "without any award of costs or fees to any party," according to a document filed in the U.S. District Court in Savannah, Ga. It's the latest wrinkle in a saga that began in May, when Deen admitted under oath in a deposition to having used the N-word in the past.
SPORTS
March 27, 1999 | MELANIE NEFF
While Lindsey Knoff walked to the plate to lead off the seventh inning for Troy, she looked into the stands and told some fans she was going to hit a double up the middle. She amended that seconds later, saying she was going to right field instead, since Rosary pitcher Mallory Anderson was throwing her pitches outside. On Anderson's first pitch, Knoff slammed a shot down the right-field line for a triple that led to No.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- Labor Secretary Hilda Solis, the first Latina to serve in a Cabinet, is stepping down, the White House announced Wednesday. In a letter to employees at the department, Solis said she submitted her resignation to President Obama Wednesday afternoon. After reflecting on her future with friends and family in California over the holidays, Solis said she “decided to begin a new future, and return to the people and places I love and that have inspired and shaped my life.” “Together we have achieved extraordinary things and I am so proud of our work on behalf of the nation's working families,” she said.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2013 | By Richard Simon
The capital is full of portraits of government officials, sometimes more than one of the same person. Elliot Richardson has four - one for each department he headed in the 1970s, including the Defense Department, where he was secretary for just four months. Donald H. Rumsfeld has two on display at the Pentagon, one for each of his stints as Defense secretary. Scores of others - Cabinet members, congressional leaders, heads of agencies such as NASA and the National Science Foundation and military leaders - are immortalized in oil paintings, an enduring tradition that has become part of the nation's historical record.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - President Obama is expected by environmental advocates to name Gina McCarthy, the controversial chief of the Environmental Protection Agency's air pollution arm, to head the agency. The nomination of McCarthy, 58, who has served as the head of the EPA's clean-air division since 2009, could come as early as next week, according to officials of three environmental groups. Her boss, Lisa Jackson, left the administrator's post Thursday. McCarthy's nomination is likely to draw fire from congressional Republicans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
It's true that a federal judge on Tuesday tossed out the racial discrimination claims against Paula Deen in a lawsuit brought by a former restaurant employee. Does this mean that Deen has been unfairly maligned as a racist and that she will emerge from the harsh fog of judgment that has surrounded her, retaking her place in the sun as television's Queen of Butter and sought-after endorser of many cuisine-related products? Doubtful. U.S. District Court Judge William T. Moore, after all, did not rule on allegations by the former employee, Lisa Jackson, that Deen and her business partner brother, Earl “Bubba” Hiers, created or condoned a nightmare of an environment at their Savannah, Ga., restaurant.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - House Republican leaders and a watchdog group have asked the Environmental Protection Agency to respond to allegations that Administrator Lisa P. Jackson has been using a secret private email account to do official business, purportedly to shield correspondence from the reach of the Freedom of Information Act. On Tuesday, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a nonpartisan good-government group, sent a letter to...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
It's true that a federal judge on Tuesday tossed out the racial discrimination claims against Paula Deen in a lawsuit brought by a former restaurant employee. Does this mean that Deen has been unfairly maligned as a racist and that she will emerge from the harsh fog of judgment that has surrounded her, retaking her place in the sun as television's Queen of Butter and sought-after endorser of many cuisine-related products? Doubtful. U.S. District Court Judge William T. Moore, after all, did not rule on allegations by the former employee, Lisa Jackson, that Deen and her business partner brother, Earl “Bubba” Hiers, created or condoned a nightmare of an environment at their Savannah, Ga., restaurant.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - President Obama is expected by environmental advocates to name Gina McCarthy, the controversial chief of the Environmental Protection Agency's air pollution arm, to head the agency. The nomination of McCarthy, 58, who has served as the head of the EPA's clean-air division since 2009, could come as early as next week, according to officials of three environmental groups. Her boss, Lisa Jackson, left the administrator's post Thursday. McCarthy's nomination is likely to draw fire from congressional Republicans.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- Labor Secretary Hilda Solis, the first Latina to serve in a Cabinet, is stepping down, the White House announced Wednesday. In a letter to employees at the department, Solis said she submitted her resignation to President Obama Wednesday afternoon. After reflecting on her future with friends and family in California over the holidays, Solis said she “decided to begin a new future, and return to the people and places I love and that have inspired and shaped my life.” “Together we have achieved extraordinary things and I am so proud of our work on behalf of the nation's working families,” she said.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Lisa P. Jackson, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency during President Obama's first term, told her staff Thursday morning she was stepping down next month. She earlier advised the president after his November reelection that she no longer wanted to continue running the agency, and told her staff that as she leaves “the ship is sailing in the right direction.” But Republicans in Congress, many environmental advocates and sometimes the White House itself has complained Jackson has not done enough to tackle such issues as climate change, global warming and other environmental worries.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - House Republican leaders and a watchdog group have asked the Environmental Protection Agency to respond to allegations that Administrator Lisa P. Jackson has been using a secret private email account to do official business, purportedly to shield correspondence from the reach of the Freedom of Information Act. On Tuesday, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a nonpartisan good-government group, sent a letter to...
NATIONAL
February 9, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
The head of the Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday criticized a bill drafted by Republicans on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, saying it would strip the agency of its ability to curb greenhouse gas emissions. The committee's proposed Energy Tax Prevention Act of 2011 would "eliminate portions of the Clean Air Act, the landmark law that all American children and adults rely on to protect them from harmful air pollution," EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson told a packed committee hearing.
NATIONAL
February 9, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
The head of the Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday criticized a bill drafted by Republicans on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, saying it would strip the agency of its ability to curb greenhouse gas emissions. The committee's proposed Energy Tax Prevention Act of 2011 would "eliminate portions of the Clean Air Act, the landmark law that all American children and adults rely on to protect them from harmful air pollution," EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson told a packed committee hearing.
SPORTS
March 27, 1999 | MELANIE NEFF
While Lindsey Knoff walked to the plate to lead off the seventh inning for Troy, she looked into the stands and told some fans she was going to hit a double up the middle. She amended that seconds later, saying she was going to right field instead, since Rosary pitcher Mallory Anderson was throwing her pitches outside. On Anderson's first pitch, Knoff slammed a shot down the right-field line for a triple that led to No.
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