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Lisa Kekaula

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NEWS
August 28, 2003 | Adam Bregman
This singer with the soul-punk outfit, the BellRays, has a soft spot for Riverside, where the band is based. The BellRays' last studio album was "Grand Fury" in 2001. Since then, they've been crisscrossing the country and Europe nonstop. Riverside rocks When it's not catching all the smog from Los Angeles, Riverside is absolutely gorgeous. We're 60 miles from everything -- the desert, the beach, the mountains.
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NEWS
August 28, 2003 | Adam Bregman
This singer with the soul-punk outfit, the BellRays, has a soft spot for Riverside, where the band is based. The BellRays' last studio album was "Grand Fury" in 2001. Since then, they've been crisscrossing the country and Europe nonstop. Riverside rocks When it's not catching all the smog from Los Angeles, Riverside is absolutely gorgeous. We're 60 miles from everything -- the desert, the beach, the mountains.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2005 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
Rock history tends to view the MC5 as an influential though ill-fated '60s proto-punk band that pushed for political revolution. But at root, all the Detroit group wanted was to get people dancing. Jazz history tends to see the Sun Ra Arkestra as one of the most colorful entries in the free music revolution. But at root, the ensemble often just wanted to get people swinging.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2001 | NATALIE NICHOLS
Rage Against the Machine ain't got nothin' on this Southern California quartet, whose self-described "maximum rock 'n' soul" has earned it many a favorable comparison to proto-punk Detroit rabble-rousers the MC5. Picking up where its explosive 1998 debut, "Let It Blast," left off, the players again mix the chaotic stance of their Motor City predecessors with a range of R&B flavors, from Thee Midniters to Sly & the Family Stone.
NEWS
August 24, 2006 | Chris Barton
After 15 years slugging it out in the L.A. scene, the BellRays' Lisa Kekaula may not yet have heard it all. But she has heard most of it. She's heard about her voice, a brassy, buttery instrument that measures up nicely against soul icons like Aretha Franklin. She's heard about her band's sound, a genre-bending mix of Stax/Volt funk and churning, studded-belt guitar. And above all she's been asked to pick sides: Do you play soul? Punk? Soul-punk? Which is it?
NEWS
August 18, 2005 | Kevin Bronson
Real, yet danceable Give Justin Warfield points for bravado: The frontman of She Wants Revenge is not only cognizant that the band's forthcoming debut represents a brooding slab of danceable '80s rock, but he's also confident it should be considered with the decade's original artists, not today's revivalists. "This is not a studied attempt to make a particular style of music," the 32-year-old singer-guitarist says of his project with Adam Braven, better known to L.A. as DJ Adam 12.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2006 | Rich Kane, Special to The Times
You couldn't help thinking Saturday during the inaugural Detour Festival of all the other pop music fests whose shadows it lands in: It's a less pushy-shovey Sunset Junction Street Fair with bigger bands; it's a San Diego Street Scene when it was still held in the Gaslamp Quarter, only without the wandering drag queens and stilt walkers; it's Austin's Sixth Street on any weekend night, minus the frat boys throwing up every 50 feet; it's Coachella without the heatstroke and the Bataan Death
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2004 | Dean Kuipers; Natalie Nichols; Steve Baltin; Steve Hochman
Dizzee Rascal "Boy in Da Corner" (Matador) *** 1/2 In 2002, English hip-hop producer and rapper Mike Skinner, a.k.a. the Streets, introduced Americans to a relentless, verbose, street-tuff style called garage or two-step, a combination of minimalist beat and torrid rap that broke hip-hop free from R&B and, at the time, sounded like a revolution. Now it's clear he was just making way for Dizzee Rascal.
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