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Lisa Loomer

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2000 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, Susan Freudenheim is The Times' art writer
What's funny about infertility? You could build a new Wailing Wall for couples who've exhausted their savings pursuing the latest in reproductive technology. Buckets of tears flow at support groups for frustrated aspiring parents. For Lisa Loomer, even the most painful journey is better with a sense of humor. So she's written a play that mixes satire with sadness, wit with wisdom.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2011 | By Margaret Gray
Did Medea's sons have play dates? Did Gertrude call out, "Use your words, Hamlet!" when her toddler got grabby in the sandbox? What was Amanda Wingfield's rapport with her obstetrician like? At what age did Mother Courage start her daughter Kattrin on solids? Such questions apparently didn't interest Sophocles, Shakespeare, Williams or Brecht. More recently, writers have noticed that the ordinary joys, disappointments, doubts, grief, heroism and self-sacrifice that are part of every mother's everyday experience make pretty good stories.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a Times staff writer
It's another semi-sweaty afternoon in a Mark Taper Forum rehearsal room. Two actresses seated on hospital gurneys are running through the final scene of Lisa Loomer's "The Waiting Room," which opens at the Music Center theater this week. Two other actresses are waiting in the offstage area, hidden by screens. The playwright is seated at a table. There are also stage managers and assistants nearby. Yet what's striking is that all of these people are women.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
PLEASE put down whatever else you might be doing. This review demands your undivided attention. If you're still defiantly checking your BlackBerry, you might want to consider squeezing into your schedule Lisa Loomer's new play, "Distracted," which had its world premiere Sunday at the Mark Taper Forum. The drama revolves around a mother (Rita Wilson) whose 9-year-old son, Jesse (Hudson Thames), has all the symptoms of attention deficit disorder (ADD).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
At once slick, peppy and a little grueling, Lisa Loomer's infertility comedy "Expecting Isabel," now at the Mark Taper Forum, will hit many, many folks where they live.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1990
In regard to Parachini's May 8 report, "More Arts Groups Threaten to Reject NEA Money," in which I was quoted, I would like to expand on my position. My NEA grant was given on the basis of work that was highly critical of U.S. foreign policy. I have no doubt that Sen. Jesse Helms would find my politics "obscene." I will continue to write, as I always have, without fear of censorship. I will also use my work as a means to be critical of the growing censorship in this country. (I've just written a scene in which a theater is not doing any work in English at all because the theater's leaders feels that if the NEA can't understand the work, it will be less likely to cut off funding.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1986 | CHALON SMITH
Lisa Loomer's background may be in comedy, but her career took a dramatic turn when South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa decided to premiere her first full-length play, "Birds," now playing on its Second Stage. The petite, dark-haired Loomer, a successful comedienne on New York's cabaret circuit, was a participant last summer in SCR's first Hispanic Playwrights Project. "Birds," which runs until Dec. 7, is the first of the workshop plays to be produced.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
PLEASE put down whatever else you might be doing. This review demands your undivided attention. If you're still defiantly checking your BlackBerry, you might want to consider squeezing into your schedule Lisa Loomer's new play, "Distracted," which had its world premiere Sunday at the Mark Taper Forum. The drama revolves around a mother (Rita Wilson) whose 9-year-old son, Jesse (Hudson Thames), has all the symptoms of attention deficit disorder (ADD).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2011 | By Margaret Gray
Did Medea's sons have play dates? Did Gertrude call out, "Use your words, Hamlet!" when her toddler got grabby in the sandbox? What was Amanda Wingfield's rapport with her obstetrician like? At what age did Mother Courage start her daughter Kattrin on solids? Such questions apparently didn't interest Sophocles, Shakespeare, Williams or Brecht. More recently, writers have noticed that the ordinary joys, disappointments, doubts, grief, heroism and self-sacrifice that are part of every mother's everyday experience make pretty good stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1994
"Pay What You Can" discount tickets will be available for the Sept. 6 evening performance of Lisa Loomer's play "The Waiting Room" at the Mark Taper Forum. Tickets will go on sale at noon Sept. 6 and must be purchased in cash at the Taper box office. Limit two per person. Information: (213) 972-0700; (TDD) (213) 680-4017.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
At once slick, peppy and a little grueling, Lisa Loomer's infertility comedy "Expecting Isabel," now at the Mark Taper Forum, will hit many, many folks where they live.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2000 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, Susan Freudenheim is The Times' art writer
What's funny about infertility? You could build a new Wailing Wall for couples who've exhausted their savings pursuing the latest in reproductive technology. Buckets of tears flow at support groups for frustrated aspiring parents. For Lisa Loomer, even the most painful journey is better with a sense of humor. So she's written a play that mixes satire with sadness, wit with wisdom.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a Times staff writer
It's another semi-sweaty afternoon in a Mark Taper Forum rehearsal room. Two actresses seated on hospital gurneys are running through the final scene of Lisa Loomer's "The Waiting Room," which opens at the Music Center theater this week. Two other actresses are waiting in the offstage area, hidden by screens. The playwright is seated at a table. There are also stage managers and assistants nearby. Yet what's striking is that all of these people are women.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1990
In regard to Parachini's May 8 report, "More Arts Groups Threaten to Reject NEA Money," in which I was quoted, I would like to expand on my position. My NEA grant was given on the basis of work that was highly critical of U.S. foreign policy. I have no doubt that Sen. Jesse Helms would find my politics "obscene." I will continue to write, as I always have, without fear of censorship. I will also use my work as a means to be critical of the growing censorship in this country. (I've just written a scene in which a theater is not doing any work in English at all because the theater's leaders feels that if the NEA can't understand the work, it will be less likely to cut off funding.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1986 | CHALON SMITH
Lisa Loomer's background may be in comedy, but her career took a dramatic turn when South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa decided to premiere her first full-length play, "Birds," now playing on its Second Stage. The petite, dark-haired Loomer, a successful comedienne on New York's cabaret circuit, was a participant last summer in SCR's first Hispanic Playwrights Project. "Birds," which runs until Dec. 7, is the first of the workshop plays to be produced.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2004 | Don Shirley
When New York's Outer Critics Circle announced nominations for its annual theater awards Monday, Liza Colon-Zayas was listed as a nominee for best actress for "Living Out," Lisa Loomer's play about L.A. nannies and their employers. A day later, however, the Circle revealed that because of "an editorial error," the nomination really was Zilah Mendoza's from the same production at New York's off-Broadway Second Stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
Two playwrights whose work has been seen at South Coast Repertory--Marlane Meyer and Anthony Clarvoe--have been awarded $15,500 fellowships by the National Endowment for the Arts. The official NEA announcement will be made Monday. Meyer's "The Geography of Luck" received its world premiere on the SCR Second Stage in May of 1989 and won SCR's California Play Competition that year. She is also the author of "Kingfish" and "Etta Jenks," which premiered at the Los Angeles Theatre Center.
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