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Lisa Loomer

ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1988 | HERMAN WONG
Six young authors have been selected from 78 applicants for the third annual Hispanic Playwrights Project at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. The group, which will meet Aug. 2-14 for readings and workshops with dramaturges, directors and actors, includes: Rafael Melendez of El Paso, Tex.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1987 | CHALON SMITH
South Coast Repertory's second annual Hispanic Playwrights Project--the dramaturge program that produces new plays by Latino writers--has received 75 scripts from across the country, program director Jose Cruz Gonzalez said. Although more plays (109) were received last year, Gonzalez said the quality of this year's submissions is higher. "We had a good group before, and this group is even better," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1999
Theater A film noir-style P.I. solves the case of a wedding ring lost in 1929 that resurfaces in 1999 in Lisa Loomer's new play, "Broken Hearts: A B.H. Mystery," a Cornerstone Theater presentation closing Sunday at Los Angeles Theatre Center, Theatre 2, 514 S. Spring St., downtown Los Angeles. Tonight-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m. $8 to $10, but no one turned away for lack of funds. (213) 485-1681. "You Can't Take It With You," Moss Hart and George S.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2000
* Theater. The West Coast premiere of "Expecting Isabel," Lisa Loomer's comedy about a couple's reproductive odyssey through fertility treatments, support groups, adoption facilitators and more, opens Aug. 3 at 8 p.m. at the Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. Regular schedule: Tuesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Sundays, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays-Sundays, 2:30 p.m. Dark Aug. 12. Ends Aug. 27. $29 to $42. (213) 628-2772. * Movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1990 | Don Shirley
The controversy over new anti-obscenity language in National Endowment for the Arts legislation, originally focused on the visual arts, has hit the theater world. Playwright Terrence McNally, whose "Lisbon Traviata" is expected on the Mark Taper Forum schedule next season, wrote a letter to the Dramatists Guild newsletter criticizing the writers who sign acceptances of this year's round of NEA fellowships: "Yes, an artist has mouths to feed and bills to pay . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2000
After reading Michael Phillips' review of Lisa Loomer's "Expecting Isabel," I have come to the conclusion that he does not like to be entertained ("Beyond the Birds and Bees," Aug. 4). Rather, he seems to enjoy suffering perhaps under the pseudo-intellectual notion that for theater to be deep, it must make you suffer. Having suffered through three excruciatingly unentertaining plays (which shall remain nameless) that Phillips reviewed favorably, I should not have been surprised that the joyously funny, tearfully poignant and thought-provoking "Isabel" would receive a snide, sarcastic and snooty pan from him. It is a play that leaves you laughing through tears.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1986 | HERMAN WONG
South Coast Repertory Theatrewill offer five world-premiere productions by American playwrights--including Keith Reddin's "Highest Standard of Living" and Craig Lucas' "Three Postcards"--in the 1986-87 season at the two-playhouse complex in Costa Mesa. At the Mainstage playhouse, SCR's producing artistic director, David Emmes, will direct the Reddin work, which opens the season Sept. 9 and runs through Oct. 12. Norman Rene will direct the Lucas play, Jan. 6 through Feb. 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1988 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
South Coast Repertory's Hispanic Playwright Project will have twice as much in its budget, and the project's annual workshop will last twice as long this summer, because of a $50,000 Ford Foundation grant announced Wednesday. With a budget of $100,000, the 3-year-old play development program for emerging Latino writers will also offer a conference for directors, actors and dramaturges that will take place six weeks before the annual workshop.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2003
I read the article about the nannies and employers attending Lisa Loomer's "Living Out" with rising disgust ("Domestic Drama," by Michael Quintanilla, March 1). One of the mothers, trying to make a case for how it's hard not only for the nanny but for the employer as well, claims that "you can make $200,000 a year and you are still struggling to pay your bills every month," because a higher income demands a higher standard of living. My question is: Why? $200,000 a year would be riches untold for my family!
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The peppy, upbeat reporting in "The Emerging Majority: Mexican Americans in Los Angeles" (9 p.m. tonight, KCAL-TV Channel 11; repeats 2 p.m., Sunday ; SAP channel for Spanish-language version) reflects a developing optimism about Latinos here. You can see it on the city's commercial streets, especially Broadway on weekends. You can hear it on the radio with KLAX-FM's banda sounds thrashing the competition.
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