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Lisa Valk

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BUSINESS
July 2, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lisa Valk was named publisher of Time magazine and Ann Moore was named publisher of People in a broad realignment of management duties announced Monday by Time Warner's Time Inc. Magazine Co. unit. The 41-year-old Valk, a Harvard MBA who became publisher of Life in 1986 and of People in 1988, will be the first woman to run the flagship publication of the nation's largest magazine company.
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BUSINESS
July 2, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lisa Valk was named publisher of Time magazine and Ann Moore was named publisher of People in a broad realignment of management duties announced Monday by Time Warner's Time Inc. Magazine Co. unit. The 41-year-old Valk, a Harvard MBA who became publisher of Life in 1986 and of People in 1988, will be the first woman to run the flagship publication of the nation's largest magazine company.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Time Promotes 2 Executives: Lisa Valk Long, president of Time magazine, has been promoted to executive vice president of Time Inc., making her the highest-ranking woman executive ever at the publishing concern. Long, 45, will succeed Don Barr, 60, who plans to retire next year after more than 38 years at the company. Bruce Hallett, 45, managing director of Time Inc. Magazines-South Pacific, was named to succeed Long at the magazine.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1988
Time Inc. Magazines has made the following executive changes: - Richard B. Thomas, 57, senior vice president-advertising of Time Inc. Magazines, will retire after 31 years with the company and will become a company consultant. - Donald M. Elliman Jr., 44, publisher of People magazine, will become executive vice president-marketing, a newly created position, responsible for all group-wide advertising sales, marketing and information activities.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1992 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time does not stand still. However, the long-awaited redesign of America's original newsmagazine is far from a radical leap, to judge by prototypes of the new Time, hitting newsstands today. "It's not exactly what I'd call revolutionary. I think you'll recognize the bloodlines," said Chrysler Corp. Vice President Bud Liebler, one of numerous advertisers who got an advance briefing from Time executives--and applauded the changes.
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