Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLisa Wolpe
IN THE NEWS

Lisa Wolpe

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1998 | PHILIP BRANDES
Resetting "A Midsummer Night's Dream" amid the graffiti hues and staccato strains of urban hip-hop has its share of compromises, but on balance Lisa Wolpe's adventurous staging for the Los Angeles Women's Shakespeare Company comes down squarely in the plus column. The result is an accessible, family-friendly romp in which the soul-searching verse of the Bard even undergoes a scansion-stretching marriage with the soulful style of Aretha Franklin("R-E-S-P-E-C-T / Give that changeling boy to me!").
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES
Back in 1927, art, madness and Freudian analysis coalesced in the fevered dramatic vision of Stanislaw Witkiewicz's "The Madman and the Nun"--a work so impenetrably weird and heavy-handed it languished in obscurity for decades. All the more reason to relish director Ron Campbell and Buffalo Nights Theatre Company's witty, macabre new adaptation, which mines gold from Witkiewicz's absurdist psychodrama.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES
Back in 1927, art, madness and Freudian analysis coalesced in the fevered dramatic vision of Stanislaw Witkiewicz's "The Madman and the Nun"--a work so impenetrably weird and heavy-handed it languished in obscurity for decades. All the more reason to relish director Ron Campbell and Buffalo Nights Theatre Company's witty, macabre new adaptation, which mines gold from Witkiewicz's absurdist psychodrama.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1998 | PHILIP BRANDES
Resetting "A Midsummer Night's Dream" amid the graffiti hues and staccato strains of urban hip-hop has its share of compromises, but on balance Lisa Wolpe's adventurous staging for the Los Angeles Women's Shakespeare Company comes down squarely in the plus column. The result is an accessible, family-friendly romp in which the soul-searching verse of the Bard even undergoes a scansion-stretching marriage with the soulful style of Aretha Franklin("R-E-S-P-E-C-T / Give that changeling boy to me!").
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1998 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shakespeare's blithe forest frolic, "A Midsummer Night's Dream," is a great way to introduce children to a classic theater work, and the respected Los Angeles Women's Shakespeare Company's new adaptation is especially family friendly, according to artistic director Lisa Wolpe. "I think it's Shakespeare's most accessible play," Wolpe said, "and in our contemporary setting, it's even more accessible."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER, Robert Koehler is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
This is a story that begins on the boards of William Shakespeare's theater, the Globe, where theater announced itself as it never had before. Every kind of character--from king to clown, from barmaid to magician--came to life. Every kind of subject--political, historical, ephemeral--was allowed to take the stage. Everything seemed possible in the theater, except one: Women portraying women. Even in a society ruled by a woman, Elizabeth I, women were barred from the stage.
NEWS
July 7, 2005 | David C. Nichols
"The Merchant of Venice": Director-actress Lisa Wolpe of the Los Angeles Women's Shakespeare Company and her all-female crew give the Bard's dark comic study of anti-Semitism and ambivalent romantic intrigue an invigorating boost. Wolpe aptly sets the action in 1942, with clashes unfolding amid the brick-and-marble levels and Christian icons of Katrina Coulorides' smart Ivy Substation set.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2008
It's hard to top the soaring musicality of the L.A. Opera doing Giuseppe Verdi's "Otello," but let's not forget the Bard churned out a pretty nifty version of the epic tale of love, revenge and betrayal himself. And while Shakespeare's original productions were notorious for having men play every role -- masculine and otherwise -- this Saturday, the Los Angeles Women's Shakespeare Company returns the favor with their all-female "Othello."
MAGAZINE
March 20, 1994 | R. Daniel Foster
Shakespeare was the ultimate gender-bender: Even within the confines of the Elizabethan era's ban on women actors, he contrived plots that had men portraying women and women posing as men. The Los Angeles Women's Shakespeare Company is keeping the unisex tradition alive, albeit on the flip side. "This is not a lesbian fantasy on an Elizabethan theme," says Emilie Talbot, who played a servant in "Romeo and Juliet," the group's first production, staged last year at the Hollywood Actors Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1997 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
The Los Angeles Women's Shakespeare Company's version of "Measure for Measure" at the Gascon Center Theatre features an all-female cast. As in this group's past productions, this gender-bending conceit seems completely intrinsic to the material and lends new levels of meaning to a familiar classic. Perhaps Shakespeare's darkest and most morally ambiguous comedy, "Measure for Measure" presents a particular difficulty to its interpreters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1998 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shakespeare's blithe forest frolic, "A Midsummer Night's Dream," is a great way to introduce children to a classic theater work, and the respected Los Angeles Women's Shakespeare Company's new adaptation is especially family friendly, according to artistic director Lisa Wolpe. "I think it's Shakespeare's most accessible play," Wolpe said, "and in our contemporary setting, it's even more accessible."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER, Robert Koehler is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
This is a story that begins on the boards of William Shakespeare's theater, the Globe, where theater announced itself as it never had before. Every kind of character--from king to clown, from barmaid to magician--came to life. Every kind of subject--political, historical, ephemeral--was allowed to take the stage. Everything seemed possible in the theater, except one: Women portraying women. Even in a society ruled by a woman, Elizabeth I, women were barred from the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1995 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
If you haven't seen a production by the Los Angeles Women's Shakespeare Company, you might dismiss the group's all-female ensemble as a counterculture conceit, a gimmick that could wear thin over the course of time. Never fear. The group's present production of "Hamlet" at Gascon Center Theatre proves anew how viscerally effective women can be in the great Shakespearean roles. A case in point is Lisa Wolpe's Hamlet.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2001 | Philip Brandes
Rambling, hard to follow and torn by jagged time lapses and shifts of tone, "The Winter's Tale" is notoriously difficult to pull off under any circumstances. Tackling it with an all-female cast is a more daunting challenge than the Los Angeles Women's Shakespeare Company has faced with previous stagings of the Bard's better-known works.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|