Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLiteracy
IN THE NEWS

Literacy

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2009 | HECTOR TOBAR
In her one-bedroom apartment in the Pico-Union district, garment worker Julia Rodriguez lives surrounded by young readers. Her oldest child, 10-year-old Santos, is giving Harry Potter a try. Nine-year-old Wendy devours girl-detective stories. Even her youngest, 6-year-old Marlyn, zips through early-reader books. "Tim spins," Marlyn reads from her book. "Tim spins his hat." Julia listens to her daughter and beams. Until recently, the 34-year-old mother of three couldn't read the simplest sentence in any language.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
"It's time to get going again. " With these words, host and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson kicks off the new documentary series, "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey. " Premiering on Fox, the National Geographic Channel and eight other affiliated networks Sunday night, it is a follow-up to "Cosmos: A Personal Voyage," the groundbreaking and hugely popular 1980 PBS series hosted by astronomer Carl Sagan. Tyson, strolling along the scenic California coastal cliffs of Monterey - just as Sagan did in the opening minutes of the original - is talking about bringing the franchise to a new generation, but with a command that can also be interpreted as a mission statement.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1999
Louis Rosen's letter on March 10 points out correctly that the problem with California children's reading performance has a lot to do with literacy at home. He indicates that one way to overcome illiteracy is to provide literacy programs for parents. That is already happening in many of our schools. Washington Elementary School in Santa Ana [has] wonderful programs. There is a reading program for parents and preschoolers. Parents come to school on Friday afternoons to read to their toddlers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Wallykazam!," you might have guessed from the title, is a show for young people. Premiering Monday afternoon on Nickelodeon, it is a preschool, literacy-based cartoon that essentially takes a "Sesame Street" sound-of-this-letter blackout and works it into a 22-minute story. Wally is a 6-year-old troll with a puppyish pet dragon named Norville, evidently a graduate of the Scooby-Doo School of Diction, and a magic stick that can create things out of thin air, but only if they begin with the letter-sound of the day. (It's like a supernatural Enigma machine.)
BUSINESS
December 27, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Guess how many Americans correctly answered this basic financial question: Is the stock of a single company usually safer than a mutual fund? A) 100% B) 80% C) 60% D) None of the above. The right answer is D. Barely 1 in 2 people knew that a single stock is not safer than a mutual fund, which holds many stocks. The question, included in a survey by a pair of college professors, underscores a fundamental problem facing millions of Americans. At a time when the world of personal finance is increasingly complex - and when people are more responsible than ever for their own financial future - Americans' understanding of basic concepts is sorely lacking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1992 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
A program to recruit volunteer literacy tutors to work with youths is being organized by Councilwoman Maria Moreno. The program is offered by a task force organized by Moreno to provide a variety of services to youths at risk of dropping out of school and becoming involved with gangs. "The need is out there," Moreno said. "I've already met some youths who are interested" in being tutored.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1998 | DEBRA CANO
A literacy program for adults begins this week at the city's five libraries. The new program, Literacy Is For Everyone, or LIFE, is funded by a grant from the California State Library. It is the first time the city has received this grant money for an adult literacy program, said Kevin Moore, Central Library manager. Over the next four years, the city will receive about $100,000 a year in grant money for Anaheim's first library-sponsored program, she said.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | BETTY GOODWIN
The centerpieces were the giveaway. Rather than the usual eruptions of imported out-of-season flowers, each table was topped with a leather-bound tome by an author such as William Shakespeare, George Eliot, Edith Wharton or Pearl S. Buck. The books were propped on mini-word processors with the words "Family Literacy" on the screen. The theme of the annual Town Hall of California dinner was reading and writing--in today's parlance, literacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
Kricia Machada, a junior at Cleveland High School in Reseda, knows the value of one-on-one tutoring. And so does her student, Lorena Reynoso, who will start third grade in the fall at Napa Elementary School in Northridge. "I've seen a big improvement in her reading," said Kricia, a Northridge resident.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2003 | James Flanigan
It should dismay you to learn that Los Angeles has the most undereducated workforce of any U.S. metropolitan area. At a time when every business steps to the beat of advanced information systems, one in every four Los Angeles workers may be functionally illiterate. Thankfully, the city is launching a long-term effort to change this. The Workforce Literacy Project is not some shot in the dark, but rather a program that builds on the success of the region's network of community colleges.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Guess how many Americans correctly answered this basic financial question: Is the stock of a single company usually safer than a mutual fund? A) 100% B) 80% C) 60% D) None of the above. The right answer is D. Barely 1 in 2 people knew that a single stock is not safer than a mutual fund, which holds many stocks. The question, included in a survey by a pair of college professors, underscores a fundamental problem facing millions of Americans. At a time when the world of personal finance is increasingly complex - and when people are more responsible than ever for their own financial future - Americans' understanding of basic concepts is sorely lacking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2013 | By Alicia Banks
REDLANDS - Reading books like "Clifford the Big Red Dog" was a chance for 11-year-old Tifaha Farha to bond with her mother, Salwa. Not only did it improve Tifaha's reading skills at Bryn Mawr Elementary School, it taught her mother something as well. "She helps me with my reading because it wasn't that good," said Salwa Farha, who acknowledges that her heavy Arabic accent can be a challenge for her children as well when speaking English. "Now, she can help me with her [younger] brothers and sisters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
At 8 a.m., the energy was already rising at a gathering in the affluent community of La Verne, nestled beneath the San Gabriel Valley foothills. Nearly 80 boys sang, cheered and chanted as participants shared inspirational readings, gave selected shout-outs and led a visualization to "breathe in love. " The feel-good assembly was Los Angeles County's latest initiative to improve the literacy skills of its juvenile offenders - in this case, teenagers convicted of robbery, assault, rape and other crimes who are serving time at Camp Afflerbaugh probation camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
Carlos Guardado keeps a box in his bedroom filled to the brim with books. His collection of page-turners counts among the 12-year-old's prized possessions. "I can't be separated from them," Carlos said, smiling, his eyes bright. He listens to jazz as he reads, a tactic he learned from his English teacher at the UCLA Community School in Koreatown, where teachers acknowledge him as one of the highest-achieving students in his class. Carlos comes from a Spanish-speaking household and devours English-language books for a reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The organizers of the LéaLA Spanish-language book fair want to make the annual event in Los Angeles one of the biggest book gatherings in the United States. The schedule announced Tuesday for this year's event makes the organizers' ambitions clear: They want it to be a literary event with gravitas, but also one that draws the Spanish-speaking masses. There will be rock and rollers, writers in English, publishing houses from as far away as Buenos Aires and Madrid, and lots of events for kids, said LeaLA director Marisol Schulz . A former book editor whose writers included the late Carlos Fuentes, Schulz said the fair expects to draw 100,000 people to the three-day event at the Los Angeles Convention Center from May 17-19.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
Otherwild in Echo Park will be hosting a L.A. Food Swap event on April 28 where Angelenos can trade homemade, homegrown and foraged foods with each other. Community members are invited to come swap baked goods, preserves, fruits and vegetables, spices, condiments, beverages and more from 2 to 4 p.m. Swappers interested in attending must pre-register online and follow the L.A. Food Swap terms and conditions. 1932 Echo Park Ave., Los Angeles, www.lafoodswap.com . ALSO: Jonathan Gold quiz: Flowers 'Vegetable Literacy' by Deborah Madison Mashed potatoes 101 ... and 7 recipes
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1992 | SAM ENRIQUEZ
The Times Mirror Foundation has pledged to give $100,000 over four years to help fund a literacy center at Cal State Northridge, campus officials said Monday. The center, which will be housed in a new business and education building now under construction, will teach adults and children how to read, said Sandra Klasky, development director for the school's Department of Education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1991 | MARY HELEN BERG
In every city, there are adults who cannot read a menu, write a check, or help their children with homework. To help combat that problem, the Orange library system this month will launch its first one-on-one tutoring program to help "functionally illiterate" adults in the community. The library was awarded a $35,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Education in July to fund a one-year literacy program.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
For many of us, our experience with vegetables centers on buying them at the grocery store or farmers market. And as fresh-from-the-field as those might be, they are already removed from branches, vines or roots and often trimmed of leaves, stems or flowers - in a way, disembodied. You might never know that the leaves of sweet potatoes are heart-shaped, or that carrots are umbellifers with glorious flowers. So where's the whole vegetable story? Deborah Madison's new book, “ Vegetable Literacy ,” helps fill us in. It's an in-depth taxonomy, a reference guide/cookbook and a window into the wonders of growing a garden, from seeds to flowers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2012 | By Laura Nelson, Los Angeles Times
A year and a half ago, Laryssa Almazan wanted to build volcanoes, not write about them. But last month, the fourth-grader at Panorama Elementary in Santa Ana stood up before an audience of adults to read aloud from a 26-page book on volcanoes that she'd written herself. It was a shining moment for a young girl who had always been a decent reader but struggled with comprehension. Laryssa had never voluntarily opened a book. That began to change, her father, Juan Almazan, said, after he saw an ad for the Kathleen Muth Reading and Learning Center in the Orange Unified School District newsletter.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|