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Literary Agent

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NEWS
September 14, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
On Thursday, the Twitter feed of @BookaliciousPam was full of the normal posts: plans to attend an upcoming writers' conference, which galley service she preferred, enthusiasm for good books. Then she wrote that she had just been the victim of attempted carjacking. But it wasn't a carjacking; it was an attack by an author whose work she had rejected. Pam van Hylckama Vlieg began working as a literary agent for San Francisco's Larsen Pomada Literary Agency this summer. For years she's been blogging about romance as Bookalicious and running a separate kids' literature blog . She's one of those people who has been comfortable living online, using Twitter, Facebook, and the check-in app Foursquare.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Sen. Ted Cruz will sign a mammoth book deal, the Associated Press reports , for a memoir/polemic to be published in advance of the 2016 election. The tea party favorite is rumored to have scored $1.5 million for the book. Cruz's literary agent told the AP that the $1.5 million figure is "close" without going into further detail. The Washington Examiner reports that a number of publishers were bidding for the book, including newcomer Newsmax, which offered $1 million. If the deal is for the full $1.5 million, that would make Cruz's book deal the most lucrative of recent conservative candidates.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Over the weekend, while thousands of people in various cities across the United States were protesting the George Zimmerman trial verdict, one of the six jurors in the trial was apparently quite busy on the phone - with a literary agent. The not guilty verdict in the shooting of Trayvon Martin came on Saturday evening. And on Monday morning, the woman known as “Juror B37,” and the juror's husband, had signed an agreement to be represented by the Los Angeles-based Martin Literary Management agency, as announced by the agency's president, Sharlene Martin.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013
Lindsay Lohan now has a literary agent, according to TMZ . And where a literary agent with celebrity clients goes, book deals tend to follow. Lohan's meeting with Waxman Leavell was filmed for her reality series on OWN. The agency has represented Michael Phelps, "Survivor's" Mark Burnett and Cheryl Burke from "Dancing With the Stars. " Lohan's story has the potential to be a big seller. The starlet's public troubles began in 2007, when she was arrested for driving under the influence and possession of cocaine.
NEWS
November 30, 1990
Evarts Ziegler, 74, a literary agent whose clients included Joan Didion, John Gregory Dunne, Robert Towne, Richard Donner, Philip Kaufman, Terrence Malick, Sydney Pollack and Mario Puzo. Ziegler negotiated one of the largest prices ever paid for a film script when he represented William Goldman in the sale of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" to 20th Century Fox.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Maybe a book by a juror in the Trayvon Martin murder trial isn't such a good idea after all. On Monday it was announced that one of the jurors who had found George Zimmerman not guilty had landed a literary agent , Sharlene Martin of Martin Literary Management. Juror B37 -- who told CNN's Anderson Cooper that she had "no doubt" that Zimmerman feared for his life in the moments before he shot and killed Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teenager -- planned to write a book about the trial with her husband, an attorney.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Harper Lee, the 87-year-old author of "To Kill a Mockingbird," has filed suit against her literary agent over the rights to her classic novel. The suit alleges that the agent took advantage of Lee's age and infirmity when she assigned the copyright to him six years ago. In 2007, Lee was living in an assisted living facility and had recently suffered a stroke when she signed over the rights of "To Kill a Mockingbird" to her agent, Samuel Pinkus, and his agency Keystone Literary.
NEWS
March 23, 1991
Peter Wendell Livingston, 41, literary agent and author of best-selling "Livingston's Field Guide to North American Males." The son of Alan W. Livingston, former president of Capitol Records, Livingston represented such authors as Duane Unkefer, Merle Shain, Linda McQuaig and Martin O'Malley. A life-long hemophiliac, Livingston became infected with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus through blood products used in his treatment. On Wednesday in Halifax, Canada, of AIDS.
NEWS
February 22, 1992
Melvin L. Sokolow, 58, a literary agent, TV producer and amateur squash champion. He was a publicity director for TV Guide and literary agent for Warner Books when he and his wife, Diane, formed a production company. Authors he worked with included Abbie Hoffman, Salvador Dali and Timothy Leary. The Sokolow company produced for New World Television and Tri-Star the TV movie "Miles From Nowhere," broadcast last month on CBS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sylvia Herscher, 91, a Broadway literary agent, general manager and producer who received a special Tony Award in 2000, died Wednesday at her home in New York City. The cause of death was not reported. Herscher worked in all aspects of the theater, particularly musicals. For many years, she was secretary to composer Jule Styne, assisting him on such shows as "Make a Wish" (1951) and the 1952 revival of "Pal Joey." Born Sylvia Kossovsky in New York City, she studied piano from an early age. After marrying and raising a family, she went to work in 1950 for the producer Alexander Cohen, doing publicity for "King Lear."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Frederik Pohl, one of the great science fiction authors and editors of the late 20th century, died Monday, his family announced on his website. He was 93. Pohl was known as a dark humorist and satirist in novels such as "The Space Merchants" (1953) and "Gladiator-at-Law" (1955), both written with frequent collaborator C.M. Kornbluth, and the short story "The Gold at Starbow's End" (1972). His long career included writing novels and short stories, editing, and being a literary agent for science fiction writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Maybe a book by a juror in the Trayvon Martin murder trial isn't such a good idea after all. On Monday it was announced that one of the jurors who had found George Zimmerman not guilty had landed a literary agent , Sharlene Martin of Martin Literary Management. Juror B37 -- who told CNN's Anderson Cooper that she had "no doubt" that Zimmerman feared for his life in the moments before he shot and killed Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teenager -- planned to write a book about the trial with her husband, an attorney.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
"I believe I made a grave error in judgment in wanting to represent this story. " That's what Sharlene Martin wrote about her decision to take on Juror B37 as a client. The juror had been part of the trial of George Zimmerman, who shot and killed unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin. The jury found Zimmerman not guilty of second-degree murder, and did not decide whether he was guilty of a lesser charge of manslaughter. In an email to The Times, Martin wrote, "I decided to rescind my offer of representation after watching Juror B37 on Anderson Cooper 360. I believe I made a grave error in judgment in wanting to represent this story.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Over the weekend, while thousands of people in various cities across the United States were protesting the George Zimmerman trial verdict, one of the six jurors in the trial was apparently quite busy on the phone - with a literary agent. The not guilty verdict in the shooting of Trayvon Martin came on Saturday evening. And on Monday morning, the woman known as “Juror B37,” and the juror's husband, had signed an agreement to be represented by the Los Angeles-based Martin Literary Management agency, as announced by the agency's president, Sharlene Martin.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Who would have predicted that, in her late 80s, Harper Lee would have to file suit to get the control of "To Kill a Mockingbird" returned to her? According to a lawsuit filed in May, Lee, in failing health, had been "duped" into assigning the copyright of her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel to her literary agent, a lawyer. That's no small thing: A half century after its publication, "To Kill a Mockingbird" still sells more than 750,000 copies a year. In one typical six-month period in 2009, its royalties amounted to more than $1.6 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
ICM Partners has struck an alliance with New York-based Gelfman Schneider Literary Agents, in a deal designed to strengthen the talent agency's presence in the publishing world. Gelfman Schneider represents such authors as Jeffrey Deaver, the mystery writer whose books include "The Kill Room," novelist Tracy Chevalier, author of "The Last Runaway," and Tony Award-winning playwright David Rabe.  Under terms of the arrangement, the literary agency will operate under a new name, Gelfman/Schneider/ICM Partners, and ICM will seek film, television and theatrical adaptations for the authors' works.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2001
Frederick Engel, 71, who produced the films "Duel at Diablo" and "Will Penny" and helped bring "Lilies of the Field" to the screen, died Wednesday of complications from hydrocephalus at the Motion Picture and Television home in Woodland Hills. A native of Los Angeles, Engel graduated from USC and served in the Navy before taking a job in the mail room at MCA.
BOOKS
January 6, 1991 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
You've finally finished your novel, your first. Nobody's ever heard of you, but don't worry, after this book is published, the whole world will know who you are. Fans will mob you. Publishers will beg you to write for them. Agents will beat at your door. That is, after an agent finally reads your manuscript and realizes how brilliant it is. It's simple. All you've got to do is get that big-time agent to take a look at it. Only it's not that simple.
OPINION
April 19, 2013 | By David Kipen
If any line item in the state or federal budgets cries out for more resources, or even just a little more respect, it's the arts and humanities. Never mind that many writers, artists and scholars have the fresh ideas that our times so desperately need. When politicians and columnists call for increased spending on STEM projects - that's science, technology, engineering and mathematics - don't they know they're alienating at least half the country? Let's reckon with the extent of the neglect.
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