Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLiterary Agent
IN THE NEWS

Literary Agent

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Dorris Halsey, who was imprisoned by the Nazis during World War II and years later became the literary agent of Aldous Huxley and other celebrated writers in Los Angeles, died Oct. 26. She was 80. Halsey died at her home in the Hollywood Hills, business partner Kimberley Cameron said. The apparent cause was a heart attack. Halsey and her late husband founded the Reece Halsey Agency, named for him, in 1957. She continued to manage the business after he died in 1980.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1999 | ANN SHIELDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It helps to be an optimist and approachable when you are a literary agent. Who knows when you will come across the next blockbuster? Michael J. Hamilburg, literary agent and film producer in Beverly Hills, is both approachable and optimistic. His agency has been around since the 1930s, and he is as easy to reach as a phone call or letter, he said. If you wonder what kinds of manuscripts attract his attention, you can find out at the monthly meeting of the Ventura County Writers Club at 7:30 p.m.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2008 | Andrea Chang, Times Staff Writer
The production company owned by Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz filed a motion Tuesday to add two defendants to its case against the literary agent of author Clive Cussler. In the amendment filed in Colorado State Court, Anschutz's Crusader Entertainment, now called Bristol Bay Productions, requested that Cussler's publishers, Simon & Schuster Inc. and Penguin Group (USA) Inc., be added to the existing suit against Peter Lampack and Peter Lampack Agency Inc.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1995 | LISA GENASCI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Quiet modesty is not a characteristic generally associated with the often hyped world of publishing, but it does capture the spirit of one of its stars, Marie Dutton Brown. * Brown is one of only five black literary agents in this country. She's also one of the few people to have run the gamut of the publishing business--from bookstore clerk to editor at a top publisher. She sees the changes as part of her lifelong literary quest, her education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1998 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a Times contributing editor. E-mail: rscheer@aol.com
Scene 1 of a totally fictional account of how an agent's conversation with Kathleen Willey might have gone: "Kathy, baby, hear what I'm saying, it's not going to be easy to get $300,000 from a book publisher. Forget those stories about Linda, Paula and Monica. They don't just throw $300,000 away. Yes, I know that's how much you need to cover your debts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1994 | ROBERT EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an era of $1-million spec scripts and sub-25-year-old star-deal writers, Hollywood agent Judy Coppage has spun off a specialty. Most of her two-dozen writer-clients are over 50, one in his 60s. Most are studio veterans with lengthy credits but foreshortened careers. Many are hyphenates, -directors and -producers as well as -writers. And many know the feeling of repeatedly hitting Hollywood's rocky walls of rejection.
NEWS
October 30, 1986 | MIKE WYMA
William Wood remembers the reception he received when he walked into one of the large New York literary agencies with the manuscript of his first novel, "Rampage." "If it was possible to express less than no interest, they did it," the Sacramento attorney said. Discouraged, Wood gave up looking for an East Coast agent to take him on and found one in Los Angeles, Mike Hamilburg.
OPINION
April 19, 2013 | By David Kipen
If any line item in the state or federal budgets cries out for more resources, or even just a little more respect, it's the arts and humanities. Never mind that many writers, artists and scholars have the fresh ideas that our times so desperately need. When politicians and columnists call for increased spending on STEM projects - that's science, technology, engineering and mathematics - don't they know they're alienating at least half the country? Let's reckon with the extent of the neglect.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a costly defeat for the producers of classic motion pictures, the Supreme Court said Tuesday that authors and songwriters whose original works were incorporated into old movies are entitled to profit from the re-release of those productions. The 6-3 decision means that the owners of hundreds of old films which have been re-issued for use in theaters, television or videocassettes may be forced to share millions in profits with the heirs of the original artists. The impact can be seen in the case before the court: For $650, Sheldon Abend, a self-described "literary speculator" in New York, bought the copyright in the 1970s for the short story "It Had to be Murder."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2010
Elaine Koster Publisher with a knack for new talent Elaine Koster, 69, a publisher and literary agent with a knack for new talent who gave a second chance to an obscure horror writer named Stephen King and took on an unknown Khaled Hosseini and his novel "The Kite Runner," died Tuesday at St. Luke's Hospital in New York, according to Hosseini's publisher, Penguin Group (USA). The cause of death was not available. As publisher of the New American Library in the 1970s, Koster paid a then-enormous $400,000 for the paperback rights to King's "Carrie," which had sold poorly in hardcover, and was later credited with helping to make a blockbuster out of Erica Jong's "Fear of Flying.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|