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Lithography

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February 2, 1985 | MATT DAMSKER, San Diego County Arts Editor
One of the underrecognized strengths of the San Diego Museum of Art is its collection of various works on paper. But that's not hard to fathom considering the premium placed by most art institutions on big, turnstile-spinning shows of painting, sculpture and artifacts of broad appeal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2013 | By David Ng
The art of fine-art printing gets a loving albeit brief ode from director David Lynch, who has fashioned a seven-minute documentary about the famous Idem Paris atelier.  Idem Paris recently posted the video online and we've embedded it below. Virtually wordless, the movie observes the lithographic process with a detached eye, documenting the steps. Idem Paris was created in 1880 by the printmaker Emile Dufrenoy. The atelier is located in the city's Montparnasse district, and occupies a 15,000-square-foot space, according to the company's website.
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BUSINESS
October 3, 2000
A scrambling technique scripted by two Belgians has been chosen as the proposed U.S. government standard to protect sensitive data and help spur the digital economy, the Commerce Department said. The selection of the Rijndael data encryption formula capped a three-year competition among code-cracking experts to replace the aging U.S. benchmark. * * ASM Lithography Holding agreed to buy U.S. rival Silicon Valley Group Inc. for $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2011 | By Mary Rourke, Special to the Los Angeles Times
June Wayne, who helped pioneer a revival of fine-art print making in the 1960s when she founded the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles, has died. She was 93. An accomplished artist in her own right, Wayne died Tuesday at her home in Los Angeles after a long illness, according to her assistant, Larry Workman. Wayne gained an international reputation starting in 1960 when she began to invite leading artists to collaborate with professional printers at Tamarind and create artist's prints.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1992 | SUSAN KING
"Thelma & Louise" was one of the most widely discussed films of last year, won a Golden Globe and an Oscar for its screenwriter, Callie Khouri, and has become a top video rental. And now the feminist heroines are quite literally etched in stone. In late June, the Venice-based Angeles Press will release a "Thelma & Louise" lithograph created in the style and technical tradition of the early movie posters.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1998 | (Leslie Earnest)
Stone Martin Press said it will sell its private collection of antique stone lithography cigar labels. The original stone lithographs, which were located on the inside of cigar boxes, have up to 10,000 different images depicting life from 1860 to 1920, the company said. The images were painstakingly created in what the company said is now considered a lost art form.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2013 | By David Ng
The art of fine-art printing gets a loving albeit brief ode from director David Lynch, who has fashioned a seven-minute documentary about the famous Idem Paris atelier.  Idem Paris recently posted the video online and we've embedded it below. Virtually wordless, the movie observes the lithographic process with a detached eye, documenting the steps. Idem Paris was created in 1880 by the printmaker Emile Dufrenoy. The atelier is located in the city's Montparnasse district, and occupies a 15,000-square-foot space, according to the company's website.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2002 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clinton Adams, the printmaker and painter who was the longtime head of the Tamarind Institute at the University of New Mexico, has died. He was 83. Adams, who was also a teacher, art critic and art historian, died May 13 of cancer at his home in Albuquerque. "He wore many hats and all of them well," said Marjorie Devon, head of the Tamarind Institute, which, along with its forerunner the Tamarind Workshop, is credited with resuscitating fine arts lithography in this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, David Colker is a Times staff writer. and
Only 30 years ago lithographic prints by American artists were considered little more than decorative or novelty items. "They were going for five bucks, maybe $50 at the most," said Sylvan Cole, the dean of American print dealers, speaking from his home in New York. "Most artists, including the best known, were not doing much, if anything, in lithography." Since then, lithography has roared into respectability.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1998 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Two exhibitions at Cal State Long Beach appear, at first, to be unrelated. What could a conceptual installation by a pair of brothers have in common with a survey of American lithography? Well, they're in the same museum but that seems to be about it. In the end, however, the separate presentations address the common question of what happens when an image is translated from one medium to another. Los Angeles artists Doug and Gary Quinn frame the issue in "Gericault's Magic Raft."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009 | Scarlet Cheng
"That was the first part of my life," says Jay T. Last, a founder of Fairchild Semiconductor and leader of the team that developed the integrated circuit for commercial use. When he retired from the computer field, he happily found other things to absorb his restless mind. "This is the second part." At the Huntington Library's Boone Gallery, Last has just had his first tour through an exhibition featuring a collection he's spent more than three decades assembling -- "The Color Explosion: Nineteenth Century American Lithography from the Jay T. Last Collection" (through Feb. 22)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2002 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clinton Adams, the printmaker and painter who was the longtime head of the Tamarind Institute at the University of New Mexico, has died. He was 83. Adams, who was also a teacher, art critic and art historian, died May 13 of cancer at his home in Albuquerque. "He wore many hats and all of them well," said Marjorie Devon, head of the Tamarind Institute, which, along with its forerunner the Tamarind Workshop, is credited with resuscitating fine arts lithography in this country.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2000
A scrambling technique scripted by two Belgians has been chosen as the proposed U.S. government standard to protect sensitive data and help spur the digital economy, the Commerce Department said. The selection of the Rijndael data encryption formula capped a three-year competition among code-cracking experts to replace the aging U.S. benchmark. * * ASM Lithography Holding agreed to buy U.S. rival Silicon Valley Group Inc. for $1.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1998 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Two exhibitions at Cal State Long Beach appear, at first, to be unrelated. What could a conceptual installation by a pair of brothers have in common with a survey of American lithography? Well, they're in the same museum but that seems to be about it. In the end, however, the separate presentations address the common question of what happens when an image is translated from one medium to another. Los Angeles artists Doug and Gary Quinn frame the issue in "Gericault's Magic Raft."
BUSINESS
April 16, 1998 | (Leslie Earnest)
Stone Martin Press said it will sell its private collection of antique stone lithography cigar labels. The original stone lithographs, which were located on the inside of cigar boxes, have up to 10,000 different images depicting life from 1860 to 1920, the company said. The images were painstakingly created in what the company said is now considered a lost art form.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual collaboration that could help cement America's newly regained leadership in computer chip technology, AT&T, IBM, Motorola and Loral Corp. said Thursday that they would jointly develop a key manufacturing technology aimed at producing revolutionary advances in the power and sophistication of semiconductor chips.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual collaboration that could help cement America's newly regained leadership in computer chip technology, AT&T, IBM, Motorola and Loral Corp. said Thursday that they would jointly develop a key manufacturing technology aimed at producing revolutionary advances in the power and sophistication of semiconductor chips.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The complicated and volatile business of making the machines that make computer chips has become a critical battleground in the United States' ongoing technological competition with Japan--and the Japanese are winning. Over the past decade, scores of U.S. equipment and materials firms have been bought by Japanese companies or lost their edge in the market.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1992 | SUSAN KING
"Thelma & Louise" was one of the most widely discussed films of last year, won a Golden Globe and an Oscar for its screenwriter, Callie Khouri, and has become a top video rental. And now the feminist heroines are quite literally etched in stone. In late June, the Venice-based Angeles Press will release a "Thelma & Louise" lithograph created in the style and technical tradition of the early movie posters.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, David Colker is a Times staff writer. and
Only 30 years ago lithographic prints by American artists were considered little more than decorative or novelty items. "They were going for five bucks, maybe $50 at the most," said Sylvan Cole, the dean of American print dealers, speaking from his home in New York. "Most artists, including the best known, were not doing much, if anything, in lithography." Since then, lithography has roared into respectability.
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