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Lithuania Diplomatic Recognition Ussr

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NEWS
September 7, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was their country's first free day in half a century, and the 11th- and 12th-grade Estonian history classes at Tallinn Secondary School No. 1 took a break from their planned lessons Friday to discuss their tiny Baltic country's independence from the Soviet Union. "We were so determined that our little nation would not be destroyed by the Russians that we became like one person," said Heiti Valguee, a bright-eyed 11th-grader. "We held on to each other.
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NEWS
October 10, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The Soviet Union officially set up diplomatic ties Wednesday with Lithuania and Estonia, two of the three Baltic republics that became independent after the failed August coup. Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin and his counterparts, Algirdas Saudargas of Lithuania and Lennart Meri of Estonia, signed the documents formally establishing relations. Pankin said diplomatic ties with Latvia will be established at a later date.
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NEWS
September 7, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The major stories coming out of the Soviet Union: * BALTIC INDEPENDENCE: The Soviet Union gave up three prizes it had held for half a century: the Baltic republics of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. The move came at the inaugural meeting of the day-old State Council and was the first concrete episode in the breakup of the Soviet Union. "We are witnessing a historic point in time," said Lithuanian President Vytautus Landsbergis in Vilnius, his capital. Soviet Foreign Minister Boris N.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The major stories coming out of the Soviet Union: * BALTIC INDEPENDENCE: The Soviet Union gave up three prizes it had held for half a century: the Baltic republics of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. The move came at the inaugural meeting of the day-old State Council and was the first concrete episode in the breakup of the Soviet Union. "We are witnessing a historic point in time," said Lithuanian President Vytautus Landsbergis in Vilnius, his capital. Soviet Foreign Minister Boris N.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The Soviet Union officially set up diplomatic ties Wednesday with Lithuania and Estonia, two of the three Baltic republics that became independent after the failed August coup. Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin and his counterparts, Algirdas Saudargas of Lithuania and Lennart Meri of Estonia, signed the documents formally establishing relations. Pankin said diplomatic ties with Latvia will be established at a later date.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Half a century after carving up the heart of Europe in secret with Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union gave up the choicest of its spoils Friday by recognizing the independence of the three unbowed Baltic states: Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. The decision, at the inaugural meeting of the day-old State Council, had been promised by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. It was the first concrete episode in the breakup of the Soviet state that he is struggling mightily to prevent.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union may have finally acknowledged the independence of the Baltic states, but to political leaders here and in Latvia and Lithuania this chiefly means they now can begin in earnest the negotiations over the withdrawal of the Soviet military presence that has dominated their lands for 50 years. "We understand this is going to be a process, not a one-time act, and it will take some time," Andris Gutmanis, the Latvian deputy minister of economics, said Friday.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Half a century after carving up the heart of Europe in secret with Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union gave up the choicest of its spoils Friday by recognizing the independence of the three unbowed Baltic states: Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. The decision, at the inaugural meeting of the day-old State Council, had been promised by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. It was the first concrete episode in the breakup of the Soviet state that he is struggling mightily to prevent.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union may have finally acknowledged the independence of the Baltic states, but to political leaders here and in Latvia and Lithuania this chiefly means they now can begin in earnest the negotiations over the withdrawal of the Soviet military presence that has dominated their lands for 50 years. "We understand this is going to be a process, not a one-time act, and it will take some time," Andris Gutmanis, the Latvian deputy minister of economics, said Friday.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was their country's first free day in half a century, and the 11th- and 12th-grade Estonian history classes at Tallinn Secondary School No. 1 took a break from their planned lessons Friday to discuss their tiny Baltic country's independence from the Soviet Union. "We were so determined that our little nation would not be destroyed by the Russians that we became like one person," said Heiti Valguee, a bright-eyed 11th-grader. "We held on to each other.
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