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Lithuania Elections

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October 26, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuanians ventured from their unheated homes into cold, rainy streets Sunday to vote in their country's first post-Soviet parliamentary elections, which pit conservative former Communists against anti-Russia nationalists. Results were not available by late Sunday, but election officials said at least 70% of eligible citizens cast ballots.
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NEWS
October 9, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A leftist coalition headed by a former Communist leader made a strong showing in Lithuanian parliamentary elections, appearing to easily surpass the ruling Conservatives, according to partial voting results. The Social Democratic coalition, led by onetime Communist Party boss and former President Algirdas Brazauskas, had won 33% of the vote with the ballots from 219 out of 2,027 polling stations counted, the election commission reported.
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NEWS
February 24, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A visitor doesn't have to go any farther than the Central Square in front of Communist Party headquarters here in the Lithuanian capital to grasp the significance of today's republic-wide elections. Twin signs in the national colors of red, yellow and green--one in Russian, one in Lithuanian--proclaim, "A Lithuania without sovereignty is a Lithuania without a future."
NEWS
February 26, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Valdas Adamkus, the federal bureaucrat from Chicago who was elected president of Lithuania, formally gave up his U.S. citizenship Wednesday, one day before his scheduled swearing-in. Adamkus, 71, is to take the oath of office in Parliament today, then celebrate his inauguration at a rally in central Vilnius and a Mass in the capital's landmark cathedral. With his victory in January, the former regional administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency became the first U.S.
NEWS
December 22, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Political novice Arturas Paulauskas triumphed in the first round of Lithuania's presidential elections but was heading for a tough runoff with former Chicago resident Valdas Adamkus. With 64% of the vote counted, Paulauskas, 44, had garnered 45.3%. But without a majority, Paulauskas was set to face fellow political newcomer Adamkus, 71, who polled 27.6%, in a runoff Jan. 4.
NEWS
October 19, 1996 | MICHAEL TARM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dogged by charges of corruption and widely blamed for letting crime get out of hand, the Communists--the ruling party in this former Soviet republic--face likely defeat in Lithuania's parliamentary elections Sunday. The first Communists in Eastern Europe to stage a political comeback after the Soviet bloc collapsed, Lithuania's reformed Communist Party may now earn the dubious honor of becoming the first to be booed back offstage.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuania's former Communist leader, a maverick who wants closer ties with Russia without sacrificing his country's independence, regained influence as his new party captured a big bloc of parliamentary seats, according to election returns released Monday. In a stunning rebuff to their current leader, Vytautas Landsbergis, only 21% of voters cast ballots for the ruling Sajudis Movement, which spearheaded Lithuania's secession drive.
NEWS
October 9, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A leftist coalition headed by a former Communist leader made a strong showing in Lithuanian parliamentary elections, appearing to easily surpass the ruling Conservatives, according to partial voting results. The Social Democratic coalition, led by onetime Communist Party boss and former President Algirdas Brazauskas, had won 33% of the vote with the ballots from 219 out of 2,027 polling stations counted, the election commission reported.
NEWS
August 27, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How would you like the government to tack a couple of zeros on the end of your bank account balance, increasing your savings by a factor of 100? This is the seductive offer Lithuanians will vote on today in a nationwide referendum, which, if approved, would oblige the government to index bank savings to account for the hyper-inflation that ravaged the country in the early 1990s. Supporters of the measure admit it is unlikely to pass but say that if it does, it will restore economic justice.
NEWS
November 16, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The first republic to break away from the Soviet Union appeared to be on the verge of returning former Communists to power in parliamentary runoffs. Lithuanian voters angered by hard times said as they left the polls that they were ready to give the former Communists--now called the Democratic Labor Party--a chance to restore economic order. The big loser could be Sajudis, the anti-Communist party that led Lithuania to independence in 1990.
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | From Reuters
Valdas Adamkus, a Lithuanian American, defeated a former prosecutor general by a wafer-thin margin today to win Lithuania's presidential runoff election. Final results from Sunday's voting gave 72-year-old Adamkus 49.90% to Arturas Paulauskas' 49.29%, the Electoral Commission said. The presidential post in the Baltic state is largely ceremonial, but the holder appoints the prime minister and can send legislation back to Parliament for amendments.
NEWS
December 22, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Political novice Arturas Paulauskas triumphed in the first round of Lithuania's presidential elections but was heading for a tough runoff with former Chicago resident Valdas Adamkus. With 64% of the vote counted, Paulauskas, 44, had garnered 45.3%. But without a majority, Paulauskas was set to face fellow political newcomer Adamkus, 71, who polled 27.6%, in a runoff Jan. 4.
NEWS
December 12, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months ago, Valdas Adamkus was a high-ranking Environmental Protection Agency official in Chicago. He commuted to work every day from the suburb of Hinsdale and worried about things like water quality and toxic waste. Today, his picture is plastered on kiosks and bus shelters all over Lithuania along with the slogan "Free men, an open society and a strong nation."
NEWS
October 21, 1996 | From Reuters
Lithuania's independence hero, Vytautas Z. Landsbergis, looked set today to avenge a bitter defeat four years ago by former Communists as early results from parliamentary elections put his Homeland Union party out front. With 48 of the 2,037 electoral districts counted, the Homeland Union had 26% percent of the vote, the Christian Democrats 17% and the Lithuanian Democratic Labor Party of ex-Communists 13%.
NEWS
October 19, 1996 | MICHAEL TARM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dogged by charges of corruption and widely blamed for letting crime get out of hand, the Communists--the ruling party in this former Soviet republic--face likely defeat in Lithuania's parliamentary elections Sunday. The first Communists in Eastern Europe to stage a political comeback after the Soviet bloc collapsed, Lithuania's reformed Communist Party may now earn the dubious honor of becoming the first to be booed back offstage.
NEWS
August 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A referendum on compensating citizens for suffering caused by the switch to a market economy failed because the voter turnout was too low. International economists had said approval of the referendum, which was opposed by the reformed Communist government and backed by the opposition, would be catastrophic for the Baltic nation. The Central Elections Center reported that only 35% of voters had cast ballots just before polls closed.
NEWS
February 9, 1993
Lithuanians are to cast their ballots Sunday in a photo-finish race for the post-Soviet presidency of the Baltic country of 3.7 million. Although the two candidates' programs are largely the same--promoting a continued transition to a market-driven economy and friendly foreign relations--their backgrounds could not be more different.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union offered Friday to admit Rep. C. Christopher Cox and three colleagues to Lithuania--three days after the election that the congressmen were sent to observe. "I've had more bureaucratic double talk today from the Soviet Union than I can stand," Cox (R-Newport Beach) said Friday in a telephone interview. The congressional delegation has been waiting in West Berlin since Wednesday for Soviet permission to travel to Lithuania to monitor today's legislative elections.
NEWS
August 27, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How would you like the government to tack a couple of zeros on the end of your bank account balance, increasing your savings by a factor of 100? This is the seductive offer Lithuanians will vote on today in a nationwide referendum, which, if approved, would oblige the government to index bank savings to account for the hyper-inflation that ravaged the country in the early 1990s. Supporters of the measure admit it is unlikely to pass but say that if it does, it will restore economic justice.
NEWS
August 23, 1994
In Lithuania--where inflation was upward of 1,100% in 1992 and 188% in 1993--voters will cast ballots Saturday in a national referendum on requiring the government to multiply citizens' savings 100-fold. The referendum has Western economists gasping in horror.
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