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Lithuania Foreign Relations Ussr

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NEWS
January 15, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearful that the Kremlin is regressing to the Stalinist excesses that enslaved them for decades, East European governments on Monday denounced the Soviet crackdown in Lithuania that killed more than a dozen unarmed civilians. "We cannot accept the military action in Lithuania. We condemn and deplore it," Hungarian Prime Minister Jozsef Antall told a special session of Parliament convened to discuss the Soviet crisis.
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NEWS
November 5, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Independence for this country was scarcely a week old when the Lithuanians first tasted the bitter pill of pluralistic democracy. The subject was the country's sizable Polish population, which under Soviet rule had functioned as an autonomous community that elected its own local government councils. But the government of Vytautas Landsbergis thought that arrangement woefully lax.
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NEWS
September 7, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was their country's first free day in half a century, and the 11th- and 12th-grade Estonian history classes at Tallinn Secondary School No. 1 took a break from their planned lessons Friday to discuss their tiny Baltic country's independence from the Soviet Union. "We were so determined that our little nation would not be destroyed by the Russians that we became like one person," said Heiti Valguee, a bright-eyed 11th-grader. "We held on to each other.
NEWS
October 26, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alwils Barowskis is racing against time. Very shortly, he expects the Latvian government to shut down most existing free trade between Latvia and its former parent, the Soviet Union. That means the imposition of duties and import licensing rules. And that, in turn, could dry up the flow of Soviet steel and aluminum that Barowskis has been frantically buying.
NEWS
May 12, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Lithuania said Friday that it is stepping up efforts to break a Kremlin oil blockade, preparing its port to receive foreign tankers and for the first time exploiting its own oil reserves. Oil Minister Leonas Asmantas said talks were under way with oil suppliers in Saudi Arabia, Denmark and North America, and that the republic's port at Klaipeda would be ready to take deliveries starting next week.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big smiles lit up Estonian faces Monday evening as the news spread that the United States had recognized their tiny republic's independence, but any dancing in the streets, they said, will be reserved for the day that the Soviet Union acknowledges its sovereignty. "There is a very joyful mood in Estonia because we are closer than ever to becoming independent," said Tiina-Mari Nummert, an 18-year-old art student who was sketching a street scene in Tallinn's old town when she heard the news.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | Reuters
The Lithuanian Parliament has put off debate on suspending its independence declaration, President Vytautas Landsbergis was quoted as saying Monday. Landsbergis told the official Soviet Tass news agency there are no plans in the next few days for the Parliament to examine a moratorium on the declaration during talks with Soviet authorities on the future of the Baltic republic. Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Excerpts of an exchange between Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and U.S. congressional leaders at the Soviet Embassy: On Trade GORBACHEV: The American press is saying, "Gorbachev, compared to any other Soviet leader, has come to Washington very weak and he will not get anything."
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S.-Soviet trade agreement signed Friday by President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev represents a symbolic turning point between the two countries, but it is unlikely to help the shattered Soviet economy anytime soon. Although Gorbachev will not leave Washington with a formal promise that Moscow will receive "most-favored-nation" trade preferences, the treaty is a prerequisite for the preferred status and for normalizing U.S.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush gave Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev a valuable political gift Friday by signing a U.S.-Soviet trade agreement, something the Kremlin leader desperately wanted to take home to Moscow from this week's summit meeting. In return, U.S. and Soviet officials indicated, the Soviet leader told Bush that he is confident he can get peaceful negotiations started with the rebellious Baltic republic of Lithuania within the next few weeks--meeting a major U.S.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | Times Wire Services
The Soviet Union officially set up diplomatic ties Wednesday with Lithuania and Estonia, two of the three Baltic republics that became independent after the failed August coup. Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin and his counterparts, Algirdas Saudargas of Lithuania and Lennart Meri of Estonia, signed the documents formally establishing relations. Pankin said diplomatic ties with Latvia will be established at a later date.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Wednesday announced the formation of a nine-man consultative team that includes many of his early advisers on restructuring the Soviet government, including former Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze. The Tass news agency said that three members of the council will lead the Soviet Union's coming negotiations over economic and other ties with the three Baltic states, which won their independence this month.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The History Official recognition of independence for the three Baltic states ends a struggle by Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia since their annexation by the Soviet Union on the eve of World War II. But their history involves centuries of both Germanic and Russian domination. * Independence for the three provinces of imperial Russia came with the Treaty of Versailles after World War I.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Half a century after carving up the heart of Europe in secret with Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union gave up the choicest of its spoils Friday by recognizing the independence of the three unbowed Baltic states: Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. The decision, at the inaugural meeting of the day-old State Council, had been promised by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. It was the first concrete episode in the breakup of the Soviet state that he is struggling mightily to prevent.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union may have finally acknowledged the independence of the Baltic states, but to political leaders here and in Latvia and Lithuania this chiefly means they now can begin in earnest the negotiations over the withdrawal of the Soviet military presence that has dominated their lands for 50 years. "We understand this is going to be a process, not a one-time act, and it will take some time," Andris Gutmanis, the Latvian deputy minister of economics, said Friday.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was their country's first free day in half a century, and the 11th- and 12th-grade Estonian history classes at Tallinn Secondary School No. 1 took a break from their planned lessons Friday to discuss their tiny Baltic country's independence from the Soviet Union. "We were so determined that our little nation would not be destroyed by the Russians that we became like one person," said Heiti Valguee, a bright-eyed 11th-grader. "We held on to each other.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lithuanian government, retreating from its three-month-old declaration of independence, recommended on Saturday that the Baltic republic's Parliament suspend the declaration in order to begin negotiations with the central government on Lithuania's secession from the Soviet Union. The Lithuanian Cabinet proposed that the Supreme Council, the republic's Parliament, declare a "temporary moratorium" on the independence act to meet Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | From Reuters
Lithuanian President Vytautus Landsbergis said Thursday that he sees no sign yet of Moscow easing its economic sanctions against his breakaway republic despite reports that some natural gas deliveries would resume. "I checked yesterday and no one knew anything," Landsbergis said by telephone from the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius. "This may be a red herring but we will see what the future brings. So far we have nothing."
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bankers, business people and economists in the three Baltic republics were caught off guard when the collapse of last month's Kremlin putsch sent their countries surging toward independence. "Who could have predicted that it would happen so quickly?" Elmar Matt, director of the Bank of Estonia, the republic's central bank, said in an interview Wednesday. "Our prognosis was that we would be completely free by 1995."
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is ready to sign a decree at the end of this week that will recognize the independence of the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, the Kremlin told Baltic officials Wednesday. The presidential decree, as provided to Baltic officials, would declare invalid the Soviet Union's annexation of the three states in 1940 under a pact with Nazi Germany; its legal effect would be to restore their independence.
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