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NEWS
May 3, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuania, bitten hard by Soviet sanctions that forced rationing of some foodstuffs beginning this week, made a new bid Wednesday to end the crisis through negotiations, calling on Western countries to serve as its intermediaries with the Kremlin.
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NEWS
February 19, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many people would be hard pressed to find this country on a map. Like its Baltic neighbors, Latvia and Estonia, Lithuania pretty much dropped out of the news after its population and Parliament defied the Soviet army's tanks in 1991 and achieved independence.
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NEWS
May 19, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under threat of even harsher sanctions from Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Lithuania's leaders this weekend will decide whether to backtrack and suspend their declaration of independence, the breakaway republic's prime minister said Friday.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | From Reuters
Twenty-two Lithuanians have been stripped of pardons for Soviet-era criminal convictions after Israel produced evidence that they may have helped kill Jews during World War II, officials said Tuesday. About 50,000 people convicted of crimes against the Soviet state were officially rehabilitated in 1990 as Lithuania moved toward independence from the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Battered by a storm of international criticism as it re-emerges as an independent country, Lithuania's government Wednesday strongly denied charges that it is deliberately clearing many of its citizens of complicity in Nazi war crimes against Jews. A leading American Jewish organization, however, reaffirmed earlier assertions that it held proof of at least two such rehabilitations and expects to receive evidence soon that more than 100 Nazi war criminals have been cleared of wrongdoing.
NEWS
January 10, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet troops and armored vehicles were deployed in the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius on Wednesday as thousands of demonstrators opposing and supporting the republic's struggle for independence from the Soviet Union confronted one another across a square in the city's center. An estimated 8,000 pro-Moscow demonstrators, demanding that President Mikhail S.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuania's reported move to exonerate at least 1,000 people convicted of war crimes by Soviet courts violates an explicit agreement by the new government's chief prosecutor to exclude mass murder, genocide and other war crimes from any annulments of Soviet justice, the head of the Simon Wiesenthal Center said Thursday.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | MASHA HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev collided head-on Thursday with outspoken Lithuanians demanding independence on the first day of a visit to the Baltic state in which he hopes to use his personal authority to prevent the splintering of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
April 6, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lithuanian Parliament, in a conciliatory message to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, declared its readiness on Thursday to discuss its decision to secede from the Soviet Union within the context of the Soviet constitution.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuania's former Communist leader, a maverick who wants closer ties with Russia without sacrificing his country's independence, regained influence as his new party captured a big bloc of parliamentary seats, according to election returns released Monday. In a stunning rebuff to their current leader, Vytautas Landsbergis, only 21% of voters cast ballots for the ruling Sajudis Movement, which spearheaded Lithuania's secession drive.
NEWS
January 5, 1998 | From Reuters
Valdas Adamkus, a Lithuanian American, defeated a former prosecutor general by a wafer-thin margin today to win Lithuania's presidential runoff election. Final results from Sunday's voting gave 72-year-old Adamkus 49.90% to Arturas Paulauskas' 49.29%, the Electoral Commission said. The presidential post in the Baltic state is largely ceremonial, but the holder appoints the prime minister and can send legislation back to Parliament for amendments.
NEWS
February 21, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the reformist prime ministers of Latvia and Estonia resigned in respective huffs earlier this month, the government crises prompted little more than a few sighs and shrugged shoulders among the populace. Likewise, the fourth change in political leadership in Lithuania in as many years last fall hardly registered on the country's social or economic meters.
NEWS
February 16, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an unprecedented explosion of political freedom that felled more than 40 of the world's most infamous regimes, democracies around the globe are imperiled. The raw energy that inspired political upheaval across five continents, launched by Solidarity's bold strike against Poland's Communist government in 1980 and climaxed by the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, is increasingly turning into frustration and even anger. Democracy's latest wave may even be receding.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuania's former Communist leader, a maverick who wants closer ties with Russia without sacrificing his country's independence, regained influence as his new party captured a big bloc of parliamentary seats, according to election returns released Monday. In a stunning rebuff to their current leader, Vytautas Landsbergis, only 21% of voters cast ballots for the ruling Sajudis Movement, which spearheaded Lithuania's secession drive.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuanians dealt a serious blow over the weekend to Vytautas Landsbergis, the music-historian-turned-politician who led the Baltic state back to full independence, by refusing full approval to the strong presidency he had proposed.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet criminal records in support of charges that the new Lithuanian government is engaged in the wholesale official exoneration of Nazi war criminals were significantly edited before they reached the West, an examination of the originals by The Times has revealed. The editing removed at least one subject's claim that he was tortured into confessing to genocidal murder, and it eliminated indications that witnesses against the subjects sometimes qualified their testimony.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | From Reuters
Twenty-two Lithuanians have been stripped of pardons for Soviet-era criminal convictions after Israel produced evidence that they may have helped kill Jews during World War II, officials said Tuesday. About 50,000 people convicted of crimes against the Soviet state were officially rehabilitated in 1990 as Lithuania moved toward independence from the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuanians dealt a serious blow over the weekend to Vytautas Landsbergis, the music-historian-turned-politician who led the Baltic state back to full independence, by refusing full approval to the strong presidency he had proposed.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Battered by a storm of international criticism as it re-emerges as an independent country, Lithuania's government Wednesday strongly denied charges that it is deliberately clearing many of its citizens of complicity in Nazi war crimes against Jews. A leading American Jewish organization, however, reaffirmed earlier assertions that it held proof of at least two such rehabilitations and expects to receive evidence soon that more than 100 Nazi war criminals have been cleared of wrongdoing.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | From Reuters
This nation on Tuesday proposed working with Israel to ensure that criminals who took part in the World War II massacre of 200,000 Jews in Lithuania are not rehabilitated. The Vilnius government, which recently won independence from Moscow, has been angered by U.S. reports that war criminals are being exonerated wholesale through its program to rehabilitate people condemned for resisting Nazi occupation or Soviet rule. But the government admitted that mistakes may have been made.
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