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NEWS
April 2, 1990 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 1,000 Lithuanian activists thronged outside the Federal Building in Westwood on Sunday to protest increased Soviet pressure on their homeland to renounce its declaration of independence. As Lithuanian community leaders exhorted the Soviet Union to permit independence in the Baltic republic, demonstrators torched the Soviet flag, chanted anti-Gorbachev slogans and hoisted signs denouncing "Soviet occupation" of their country.
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NEWS
September 3, 1991 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Monday--before the champagne, before the polka bands, before the folk dancing and speeches and toasts--Danute Mazeika went to a cemetery in East Los Angeles with an armful of chrysanthemums and two long-awaited words. "You won," the Lithuanian-American activist said silently to her grandfather's grave.
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NEWS
September 3, 1991 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Monday--before the champagne, before the polka bands, before the folk dancing and speeches and toasts--Danute Mazeika went to a cemetery in East Los Angeles with an armful of chrysanthemums and two long-awaited words. "You won," the Lithuanian-American activist said silently to her grandfather's grave.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuanian activists, incensed over President Bush's reaction to a Soviet crackdown on the Baltic republic, lined the steps of Los Angeles' City Hall on Monday and called for a sterner, more decisive condemnation of the Red Army's assault on civilians in their homeland. Protesters railed at the Bush Administration for warning Soviet leaders to curb military actions such as the seizure of Lithuania's radio and television center on Sunday.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuanian activists, incensed over President Bush's reaction to a Soviet crackdown on the Baltic republic, lined the steps of Los Angeles' City Hall on Monday and called for a sterner, more decisive condemnation of the Red Army's assault on civilians in their homeland. Protesters railed at the Bush Administration for warning Soviet leaders to curb military actions such as the seizure of Lithuania's radio and television center on Sunday.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | MICHAEL SZYMANSKI, Szymanski is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
Their countries no longer exist as independent entities. They have no governments to report to. Yet, three diplomats from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania still wave their flags in Los Angeles with hopes that someday soon they will be representing more than a dream. For almost half a century, Los Angeles has been the only city in the world with honorary consulates for all three Baltic states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1990 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the day that Secretary of State James Baker and Soviet Foreign minister Eduard Shevardnadze debated the destiny of a nation that many Americans could place no more precisely than "over there," Rachel Samolis was at home in Marina del Rey, shuttling between the fax machine upstairs and her desk phone downstairs pitching Lithuania. To a radio talk show producer: "It's about Lithuanian independence, a very current issue. . . . Oh, interesting, I have a perfect person for her. . . ."
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | MICHAEL SZYMANSKI, Szymanski is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
Their countries no longer exist as independent entities. They have no governments to report to. Yet, three diplomats from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania still wave their flags in Los Angeles with hopes that someday soon they will be representing more than a dream. For almost half a century, Los Angeles has been the only city in the world with honorary consulates for all three Baltic states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1990 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the day that Secretary of State James Baker and Soviet Foreign minister Eduard Shevardnadze debated the destiny of a nation that many Americans could place no more precisely than "over there," Rachel Samolis was at home in Marina del Rey, shuttling between the fax machine upstairs and her desk phone downstairs pitching Lithuania. To a radio talk show producer: "It's about Lithuanian independence, a very current issue. . . . Oh, interesting, I have a perfect person for her. . . ."
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 1,000 Lithuanian activists thronged outside the Federal Building in Westwood on Sunday to protest increased Soviet pressure on their homeland to renounce its declaration of independence. As Lithuanian community leaders exhorted the Soviet Union to permit independence in the Baltic republic, demonstrators torched the Soviet flag, chanted anti-Gorbachev slogans and hoisted signs denouncing "Soviet occupation" of their country.
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