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BUSINESS
February 1, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Mattel Inc., the El Segundo toy maker, reported increased revenue in its fourth quarter, but profit fell 17% due to a litigation charge. On Friday, the Barbie and Hot Wheels maker reported net earnings of $306.5 million, or 87 cents a share, for the three-month period ending Dec. 31, 2012, compared with $370.6 million, or $1.07, in the same period the year before. During the quarter, Mattel had a charge of $137.8 million related to litigation in a trade dispute with Carter Bryant and MGA Entertainment Inc. over the Bratz doll line.
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BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Airline customers complain about being mistreated daily, but Rabbi S. Binyomin Ginsberg took his grievance all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Unfortunately for Ginsberg, the court sided Wednesday with Northwest Airlines Inc., now merged into Delta Air Lines Inc., in a case that had put carriers on edge. The ruling strengthens the industry's hand when fighting litigation filed by disgruntled passengers by bolstering a 36-year-old federal law that limits its exposure to such claims.
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AUTOS
February 27, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
Hyundai Motor America is inching closer to a settlement of claims it inflated the fuel economy ratings of its vehicles. Details of the deal are still to be worked out, but the automaker is expected to reach a settlement in 38 lawsuits on the fuel economy mislabeling, which have been combined and are being heard in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. Its corporate sister, Kia Motors America, is expected to also settle the litigation. Photos: Vehicles with overstated fuel economy claims In November, the South Korean automakers said they overstated the fuel economy on nearly 1 million late-model vehicles after the discrepancy was discovered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which monitors the fuel economy tests by automakers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
The troubled Central Basin Municipal Water District violated the state's open meeting laws when it created a $2.7-million fund in virtual secrecy, an investigation by the agency's attorneys concluded. The fund, created for a groundwater storage project, was managed without public hearings or notifications, and records related to it were among those subpoenaed by federal prosecutors. The subpoenas came after an FBI raid on the Sacramento offices of state Sen. Ron Calderon (D-Montebello)
BUSINESS
September 5, 1985
Effective Sunday, a settlement was implemented among El Paso Natural Gas, Tenneco Oil and Conoco resolving more than 12 years of litigation concerning gas properties that El Paso acquired during the 1950s in the San Juan Basin area of northwestern New Mexico.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1990 | From United Press International
Fruit of Loom Sues Over Trademark: Fruit of the Loom Inc. sued a wholesale clothing company, alleging that its prized fruit trademark was pilfered. The federal suit alleges that Two Left Feet in Malibu manufactured clothing and accessories ranging from sandals to bustiers with fruit-related trademarks called "fruit cups" and "fruit flops." The suit seeks unspecified damages. (Filed Aug. 9, 1990. Case No. 90-4254.)
BUSINESS
December 19, 2002 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Former Walt Disney Co. Vice Chairman Sanford M. Litvack will become a partner at Quinn Emanuel, a Los Angeles-based law firm that specializes in business litigation. Litvack, the former head of the Justice Department's Antitrust Division, worked at Disney from 1991 to 2001, first as general counsel, then chief of corporate operations and later as vice chairman. He left Disney to return to the Dewey Ballantine law firm, where he chaired the complex litigation department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior Ventura County government employee has sued the county, saying she endured a hostile work environment after allegedly spurning the sexual advances of 70-year-old former county Administrator Harry Hufford. Terry Dryer, 51, said she was forced to take a stress leave from her position as chief deputy administrative officer in February because Hufford had allegedly become critical and verbally abusive toward her.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1987
Walt Disney Co., Burbank, has appointed Edward J. Nowak, 38, vice president-counsel. He had been senior counsel in charge of litigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
The troubled Central Basin Municipal Water District violated the state's open-meeting laws when it created a $2.7-million fund in virtual secrecy, an investigation by the agency's attorneys concluded. The fund, created for a groundwater storage project, was managed without public hearings or notifications, and records related to it were among those subpoenaed by federal prosecutors. The subpoenas came after an FBI raid on the Sacramento offices of state Sen. Ron Calderon (D-Montebello)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Victoria Kim
The Los Angeles Archdiocese has settled what officials said is the last of its pending priest molestation lawsuits, bring to a close a decade of wrenching abuse litigation that cost the Catholic Church more than $740 million. The church reached the $13-million agreement with 17 victims last week, on the eve of a trial scheduled to begin Feb. 14 over the alleged acts of Father Nicolas Aguilar-Rivera, a visiting cleric from Mexico who police believe molested more than two dozen boys over a mere nine months in 1987.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County supervisors voted Tuesday to halt a controversial plan to send county jail inmates to a facility in Kern County after a board member who had originally supported the contract changed her mind. The supervisors voted last month to approve a $75-million, five-year plan to send about 500 county inmates serving lengthy sentences to the correctional facility run by the city of Taft. The plan was touted as a cost-effective way to free up local jail beds and increase time served by the most serious offenders.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel and E. Scott Reckard
NEW YORK - The financial crisis has finally caught up with Jamie Dimon. As leader of JPMorgan Chase & Co., he steered the nation's largest bank through the Wall Street collapse of 2008. At the prodding of panicked U.S. regulators, the mighty New York firm swallowed two teetering rivals, sparing financial markets even more turmoil. Now, even as other troubled firms are emerging from the wreckage, JPMorgan finds itself increasingly weighed down with the baggage of the crisis and other missteps since.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Howard Blume
The Los Angeles Unified School District has exited litigation that seeks to limit the seniority rights of California teachers by voiding several provisions of state law. The lawsuit, filed by the group Students Matter, originally targeted the nation's second-largest school district and two other school systems, as well as state officials and state government. But the organization decided to focus instead on the state, dropping L.A. Unified as a defendant. L.A. Unified and the other districts "are hindered by rigid and outdated state laws that harm students," according to a statement from Students Matter, which is based in Silicon Valley.
SPORTS
August 29, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
The NFL and more than 4,500 retired players reached a proposed $765-million settlement of concussion-related lawsuits, a court-appointed mediator announced Thursday. Former U.S. District Judge Layn Phillips announced the parties have agreed to a deal that would end the litigation against the NFL and NFL Properties and provide medical and other benefits, as well as compensation to qualifying injured players and their families. “This is a historic agreement, one that will make sure that former NFL players who need and deserve compensation will receive it, and that will promote safety for players at all levels of football,” Phillips said in a written statement.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
A surprise veto over the weekend by the White House of a proposed trade ban is escalating the stakes in an already epic global patent war between technology giants Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. Analysts say the decision will probably make the thicket of litigation between the two smartphone rivals even more tangled. At the same time, intellectual property attorneys are trying to understand what the rare presidential intervention may mean to existing patent rules and lawsuits.
OPINION
July 24, 2013 | Patt Morrison
A dozen years after he left the Los Angeles City Council, Mike Feuer is back in L.A.'s civic life, this time in City Hall East, as the newly elected city attorney. His several careers are all of a piece: running the low-income legal service group Bet Tzedek; half a dozen years in the Assembly, where he made his mark as a forceful and adroit legislator. His wife is a judge, his two kids are Yalies - he's a Harvard Law grad - and his politics are personal. You were elected on the same ballot that saw voters restrict marijuana dispensaries.
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