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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A lawsuit that charges Highland Federal Savings & Loan Assn. with conspiring with landlords to siphon profits from slums is "a bunch of hogwash--and you can put that in capital letters," the president of Highland Federal asserted Friday. "The city attorney made a mistake--a big mistake," Ben Karmelich said. "Highland Federal and myself are innocent of everything they charge."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A lawsuit that charges Highland Federal Savings & Loan Assn. with conspiring with landlords to siphon profits from slums is "a bunch of hogwash--and you can put that in capital letters," the president of Highland Federal asserted Friday. "The city attorney made a mistake--a big mistake," Ben Karmelich said. "Highland Federal and myself are innocent of everything they charge."
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NEWS
March 29, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
Two lending institutions have been secretly controlling Los Angeles' worst slum buildings for nearly a decade through improper lending practices involving dozens of shell companies and front men, the city attorney claimed in a massive lawsuit Tuesday. The scheme, based on falsely inflated property values, has resulted in hundreds of thousands of dollars in rents being siphoned into lenders' coffers instead of paying for court-ordered building repairs, the suit alleges.
NEWS
March 29, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
Two lending institutions have been secretly controlling Los Angeles' worst slum buildings for nearly a decade through improper lending practices involving dozens of shell companies and front men, the city attorney claimed in a massive lawsuit Tuesday. The scheme, based on falsely inflated property values, has resulted in hundreds of thousands of dollars in rents being siphoned into lenders' coffers instead of paying for court-ordered building repairs, the suit alleges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1990 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys representing 65 families announced Tuesday a $2.4-million settlement of a lawsuit filed by tenants over slum conditions in a downtown Los Angeles apartment building. The out-of-court settlement involving a building at 106 E. Washington Blvd. was described by attorneys as the second largest of its kind in Los Angeles history. "The building was maintained in poor condition for a number of years," said Mercedes Marquez, who represented the tenants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A lawsuit that charges Highland Federal Savings & Loan Assn. with conspiring with landlords to siphon profits from slums is "a bunch of hogwash--and you can put that in capital letters," the president of Highland Federal asserted Friday. "The city attorney made a mistake--a big mistake," Ben Karmelich said. "Highland Federal and myself are innocent of everything they charge."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1991 | PENELOPE McMILLAN and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ruling that dealt a severe setback to a landmark civil racketeering suit against slumlords and their lenders, a Superior Court judge said Wednesday that a Los Angeles federal savings and loan cannot be sued by the Los Angeles city attorney for its lending practices on slum properties. Judge Barnet M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1990 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Latino families living in run-down buildings near the heart of downtown Los Angeles, "Sister Kathy" is a familiar figure, a soft-voiced woman who walks unafraid down long dark corridors, dispensing no-nonsense advice. Housing activists know Kathy Wood as one of only a handful of tenant organizers in Los Angeles. Her efforts have led to two lawsuits resulting in the largest payments ever made to slum tenants in Los Angeles--a total of nearly $5 million over the last three years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1989 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Joy Mould was hired as assistant manager of a Palmdale apartment complex last year, she says, she was instructed to draw a "happy face" on all rental applications submitted by members of minority groups. The smiling faces were not meant to symbolize a positive reaction toward the prospective tenant, Mould asserted Wednesday. Rather, she said, they were a symbol to tip off her bosses, who allegedly planned to discriminate against black, Latino and Asian applicants.
NEWS
August 21, 1990 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
A new home test kit can help parents detect the presence of drugs and start children on the road to recovery, a New York company claims. SherTest Corp. launched DrugAlert on Monday, advertising the $49.95 test kit on two-minute television commercials in New York. The company plans to expand the campaign to Los Angeles and other major markets. The test kit is drawing mixed reactions and some concern from legal experts, parents and drug rehabilitation specialists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A day after his office was dealt a severe setback in a dramatic bid to hold lenders responsible for slum conditions fueled by fraudulent loans, the Los Angeles city attorney vowed to ask federal regulators to participate in the crackdown. City Atty.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Joy Mould was hired by an Orange County apartment management firm to serve as assistant manager of a Palmdale complex last year, she says, she was instructed to draw a "happy face" on all rental applications submitted by members of minority groups. The smiling faces were not meant to symbolize a positive reaction toward the prospective tenant, Mould asserted Wednesday.
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