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Littell

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ross Littell, a textile and furniture designer who helped create a three-legged chair that became an American modern classic, died April 17 in Santa Barbara. He was 75. The cause of death was a brain tumor, said his sister, Janice Currey of Malibu.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2009 | By bloomberg news
Jonathan Littell won the Bad Sex in Fiction Award, the United Kingdom's "most dreaded literary prize," for his depiction of the sadomasochistic encounters between twin siblings in "The Kindly Ones." The judges cited Littell for one incestuous scene that unfolds on the bed of a guillotine and another that invokes the myth of Cyclops, "whose single eye never blinks." These marred what the judges called an impressive work. "It is in part a work of genius," the judges said in an e-mailed statement Monday about the World War II novel, which won the Prix Goncourt, France's top book prize, in 2006.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2009 | By bloomberg news
Jonathan Littell won the Bad Sex in Fiction Award, the United Kingdom's "most dreaded literary prize," for his depiction of the sadomasochistic encounters between twin siblings in "The Kindly Ones." The judges cited Littell for one incestuous scene that unfolds on the bed of a guillotine and another that invokes the myth of Cyclops, "whose single eye never blinks." These marred what the judges called an impressive work. "It is in part a work of genius," the judges said in an e-mailed statement Monday about the World War II novel, which won the Prix Goncourt, France's top book prize, in 2006.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | Laila Lalami, Lalami's new novel, "Secret Son," will be published in April.
The Kindly Ones A Novel Jonathan Littell, translated from the French by Charlotte Mandell Harper: 984 pp., $29.99 -- Literature has given us many unsympathetic protagonists yet relatively few genuine monsters: "Lolita's" Humbert Humbert, Shakespeare's Richard III and "American Psycho's" Patrick Bateman come to mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1989 | CRAIG LEE
Philip Littell is working a little territory all his own, a kind of modern cabaret-on-the-couch, transactional-analysis pop that is the perfect compliment for the post-modern supper club ambience of Cafe Largo in the Fairfax District, where he is playing Thursday night shows through July 27. Littell is a strangely discomfiting mix of Pee-wee Herman and Noel Coward. Between his daunting deadpan and overcompensating goofiness, it's hard to tell if his intent is sarcastic, sensitive or merely a bit paranoid.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | Laila Lalami, Lalami's new novel, "Secret Son," will be published in April.
The Kindly Ones A Novel Jonathan Littell, translated from the French by Charlotte Mandell Harper: 984 pp., $29.99 -- Literature has given us many unsympathetic protagonists yet relatively few genuine monsters: "Lolita's" Humbert Humbert, Shakespeare's Richard III and "American Psycho's" Patrick Bateman come to mind.
BOOKS
August 29, 2004 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
Inexplicably, Oleg Kulakov's life has gone to pieces. His wife has left him for another man. His daughter has been committed to a mental hospital to "cure" her of lesbianism. His son has been caught using drugs and expelled from college. A Soviet diplomatic courier about to lose his security clearance, Kulakov decides to defect to the West.
BOOKS
June 12, 2005 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is the author of "The Chieu Hoi Saloon: A Novel" and is a regular contributor to Book Review.
In spy parlance, a "legend" is a fake identity, constructed as elaborately as a major character in a novel: background, accent, physical appearance, hobbies, quirks. And since we tend to become what we pretend to be, a spy doesn't don or doff a legend like a suit of clothes; he more or less has to change selves.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 18th-Century French novel about a bunch of bored aristocrats and their sexual schemes may not sound like fodder for remakes, but "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" has been on a roll in recent years. Brought to the screen in a 1959 film directed by Roger Vadim, Pierre Choderlos de Laclos' tale of erotic scheming was re-popularized in 1988 by Christopher Hampton's stage adaptation. A 1988 film based on the play and directed by Stephen Frears followed, as did a 1989 movie directed by Milos Forman.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1998 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
While Los Angeles has plenty of hyphenate artists, few ply as many trades as actor-director-singer-songwriter Philip Littell. In fact, he practically wrote the book--or rather, the libretto--on what it means to be a contemporary Renaissance artist. Well-known since the mid-1980s for his work on the local theater and cabaret scene, Littell has, in recent years, added yet another dimension to his career.
BOOKS
June 12, 2005 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is the author of "The Chieu Hoi Saloon: A Novel" and is a regular contributor to Book Review.
In spy parlance, a "legend" is a fake identity, constructed as elaborately as a major character in a novel: background, accent, physical appearance, hobbies, quirks. And since we tend to become what we pretend to be, a spy doesn't don or doff a legend like a suit of clothes; he more or less has to change selves.
BOOKS
August 29, 2004 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
Inexplicably, Oleg Kulakov's life has gone to pieces. His wife has left him for another man. His daughter has been committed to a mental hospital to "cure" her of lesbianism. His son has been caught using drugs and expelled from college. A Soviet diplomatic courier about to lose his security clearance, Kulakov decides to defect to the West.
BOOKS
June 9, 2002 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
On Friday, July 4, 1862, on a golden afternoon, the Rev. Robinson Duckworth of Trinity College, Oxford, and Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, a fellow of Christ Church College, took Lorina, Edith and 10-year-old Alice, the daughters of Henry Liddell, dean of Christ Church, boating on the Thames. "On which occasion," Dodgson noted later, "I told them the fairy tale of Alice's adventures underground."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ross Littell, a textile and furniture designer who helped create a three-legged chair that became an American modern classic, died April 17 in Santa Barbara. He was 75. The cause of death was a brain tumor, said his sister, Janice Currey of Malibu.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1998 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
While Los Angeles has plenty of hyphenate artists, few ply as many trades as actor-director-singer-songwriter Philip Littell. In fact, he practically wrote the book--or rather, the libretto--on what it means to be a contemporary Renaissance artist. Well-known since the mid-1980s for his work on the local theater and cabaret scene, Littell has, in recent years, added yet another dimension to his career.
NEWS
June 2, 1997 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Ends justify means," says the KGB agent code-named Parsifal who turns out, improbably, to be one of the good guys in Robert Littell's latest thriller, "Walking Back the Cat." "If you don't believe that . . . you will be incapable of moving the ball forward" in the great game of Cold War espionage. But the Cold War is over, and Russia would seem to have no more use for Parsifal's expertise in "wetwork," i.e., assassination.
BOOKS
June 9, 2002 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
On Friday, July 4, 1862, on a golden afternoon, the Rev. Robinson Duckworth of Trinity College, Oxford, and Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, a fellow of Christ Church College, took Lorina, Edith and 10-year-old Alice, the daughters of Henry Liddell, dean of Christ Church, boating on the Thames. "On which occasion," Dodgson noted later, "I told them the fairy tale of Alice's adventures underground."
NEWS
June 2, 1997 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Ends justify means," says the KGB agent code-named Parsifal who turns out, improbably, to be one of the good guys in Robert Littell's latest thriller, "Walking Back the Cat." "If you don't believe that . . . you will be incapable of moving the ball forward" in the great game of Cold War espionage. But the Cold War is over, and Russia would seem to have no more use for Parsifal's expertise in "wetwork," i.e., assassination.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 18th-Century French novel about a bunch of bored aristocrats and their sexual schemes may not sound like fodder for remakes, but "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" has been on a roll in recent years. Brought to the screen in a 1959 film directed by Roger Vadim, Pierre Choderlos de Laclos' tale of erotic scheming was re-popularized in 1988 by Christopher Hampton's stage adaptation. A 1988 film based on the play and directed by Stephen Frears followed, as did a 1989 movie directed by Milos Forman.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Philip Littell sits in a trendy Italian cafe around the corner from the War Memorial Opera House, downing an espresso as he pokes distractedly at a tiramisu . A recent transplant from Los Angeles, he says his phone still isn't working and he's got a bit of the flu. But these are minor annoyances for the personable and urbane songwriter who's been a fixture of L.A.'s artsy bohemia for years.
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