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Littering

NEWS
February 26, 1990 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a drizzly winter afternoon Dan Syrek stalks the edge of a city street, sloshing through mud puddles and dodging chuckholes, when he spots a piece of plastic sheeting beneath a bush. He clicks a hand counter to record the finding. A few feet away he spots a few shards of plaster. Click. A large sheet of cardboard. Click. Scattered pieces of wood. Click. To the uninitiated, the items being recorded are merely trash, the random detritus of a mobile society.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1991 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Salz, a tourist from Berkeley, thought he knew everything Southern California had to offer until he came upon the glittering apparition by the side of the Golden State Freeway. Dangling from the branches of a tall locust tree in Castaic are 11,281 glass bottles that shimmer in the sunlight and tinkle in the nearly incessant wind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Volunteers bearing trash bags and paint brushes will descend upon a Canyon Country neighborhood Saturday for a cleanup sponsored by a local citizens group. Litter and graffiti are the targets at Canyon High School, Sierra Vista Junior High School, North Oaks Park and other areas around Whites Canyon Road. The event is organized by United Mothers of Santa Clarita.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1997 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are too many butts on the beach, and Mike Beuerlein thinks it's disgusting. He means discarded cigarette butts, by far the single-most common piece of garbage polluting Orange County's shoreline last September, when the 11th annual International Coastal Cleanup took place. There was more. Besides more than 14,800 cigarettes, volunteers cleaned up 62 syringes, 60 tampon applicators, 60 condoms and more than 45,000 other trash items. "That's disgusting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1998 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sure, it's not all literature. But attorneys are ready to argue whether the cascade of dry-cleaning fliers, pizza coupons and free newspapers left on porches and doorknobs are junk or protected free speech. Pasadena's City Council declared them disposable earlier this year, outlawing the delivery of unsolicited fliers and papers to property owners who say they don't want them.
AUTOS
July 7, 2004 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
Whenever I have guests in my car, they remark about how clean I keep the interior. It's not rocket science. Whenever I have any trash, I just chuck it out the window. Paper wrappers, empty coffee cups and wads of unpaid parking tickets can create a real mess in the front seat and reflect badly on my character. So I just roll down the window and say good riddance as that stuff floats away. It's not just paper either. After finishing a beer, I promptly toss the bottle or can out the window, too.
NEWS
December 10, 1989
Standing atop the bluffs at Santa Monica's Palisades Park or walking on the warm sands of Huntington Beach, it is easy to picture the sea as unimaginably vast, almost limitless. Oceans, after all, cover 70% of the Earth's surface and contain 98.8% of its water. But oceans also receive enough of the world's wastes to raise public fears about the safety of such pleasurable pastimes as swimming, surfing and fishing.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is penal service hiding behind coy euphemisms. Work release. Celebrity diversion. Special programs. They are, in essence, chain gangs without shackles. "I sentence a lot of people to work with Caltrans," said a Los Angeles municipal court commissioner. "Because it is hard work that in the heat of summer becomes hard labor."
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | From Reuters
Seeking to tighten up on spitting and littering in public, an Environment Ministry spokesman said Thursday that the maximum fine for spitting has been raised from $75 to $500 and the maximum fine for littering has been doubled to $500.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | Associated Press
A jury found Amtrak guilty Thursday of dumping raw sewage into Florida waterways in the national rail passenger line's first such criminal trial. The state filed charges of commercial littering after Amtrak refused to stop dumping raw human wastes from moving trains onto the tracks and into the St. Johns River and Rice Creek. Amtrak contended that federal law exempts it from state pollution control laws.
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