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BUSINESS
August 29, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Netherlands Publisher to Buy Time Warner Unit: Wolters Kluwer, one of the largest publishers in the Netherlands, said it agreed to buy the professional publishing division of Time Warner Inc.'s Little, Brown & Co. unit for undisclosed terms. Boston-based Little Brown, with 140 employees and sales of about $50 million, publishes medical and legal texts, journals and reference books. Wolters Kluwer, with about $2.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
"A stillborn child is really only ever his death. He didn't live: that's how he's defined. Once he fades from memory, there's little evidence at all, nothing that could turn up, for instance, at a French flea market, or be handed down through the family. Eventually we are all only our artifacts. I am writing this before our first child turns into the set of footprints the French midwives made for us at the hospital. . . . " His name was Pudding, that's what his mother, Elizabeth, and his father, Edward, both writers, called him. That's what they put on what the French call his "certificat d'enfant sans vie."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Tom Wolfe is working on a new novel and will release it through a new publisher, ending a 40-year run with Farrar, Straus & Giroux and signing with Little, Brown & Co. "The opportunity to work with the American master Tom Wolfe is the kind of thrill and challenge that people entering book publishing dream of," Little, Brown publisher Michael Pietsch said Wednesday. One of the original "New Journalists" of the 1960s, the 76-year-old Wolfe is known for such bestselling novels as "The Bonfire of the Vanities" and "A Man in Full" and for such nonfiction classics as "The Right Stuff" and "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Tom Wolfe is working on a new novel and will release it through a new publisher, ending a 40-year run with Farrar, Straus & Giroux and signing with Little, Brown & Co. "The opportunity to work with the American master Tom Wolfe is the kind of thrill and challenge that people entering book publishing dream of," Little, Brown publisher Michael Pietsch said Wednesday. One of the original "New Journalists" of the 1960s, the 76-year-old Wolfe is known for such bestselling novels as "The Bonfire of the Vanities" and "A Man in Full" and for such nonfiction classics as "The Right Stuff" and "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge Friday ordered a Santa Barbara publishing company to paste stickers on more than 60,000 desk and wall calendars featuring photographs taken by the late Ansel Adams to warn customers that the pictures are made from reprints, not original Adams works. The order, issued by U.S. District Judge William D. Keller, represented a partial victory for Adams' estate and his long-time publisher, Boston-based Little, Brown and Co., in a lawsuit against Day Dream Publishing Inc.
BOOKS
January 23, 1994 | Paul Hemphill, Paul Hemphill's most recent book is the memoir, "Leaving Birmingham: Notes of a Native Son. "
Late in 1969, after five years as a daily newspaper columnist in Atlanta and the reward of a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard, I was summoned to New York to see if I wanted to take my act to the mother of cities. Jimmy Breslin of the Herald-Tribune and Pete Hamill of the Post had been distant models for me--hard driving, hard drinking, macho street poets from the Hemingway School--and now I was being offered a chance to compete with them from Newsday out on Long Island.
MAGAZINE
November 27, 1988 | Sam Hall Kaplan
DAVID HICKS, a London-based interior designer with an international clientele, appears in this handsome book to be a refreshingly practical professional. While indicating a personal preference for a historic classical style, Hicks nonetheless emphasizes a methodical design process devoid of stylistic prejudices.
BOOKS
May 7, 1995 | Danielle Roter, Danielle Roter, a native of Belgium, is a journalist and critic
Claire Daussois has been married to her distant cousin Henri for four years. They live in Delahaut, a French-speaking village in southern Belgium. Claire is 24 years old as Anita Shreve's new novel, "Resistance," begins, on Dec. 30, 1943. Belgium has already fallen to the Nazis and a B-17 has just fallen in a Delahaut field. Claire and Henri are part of the Belgian resistance, the Maquis.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
"A stillborn child is really only ever his death. He didn't live: that's how he's defined. Once he fades from memory, there's little evidence at all, nothing that could turn up, for instance, at a French flea market, or be handed down through the family. Eventually we are all only our artifacts. I am writing this before our first child turns into the set of footprints the French midwives made for us at the hospital. . . . " His name was Pudding, that's what his mother, Elizabeth, and his father, Edward, both writers, called him. That's what they put on what the French call his "certificat d'enfant sans vie."
NEWS
September 21, 1995 | LEE DEMBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In his long and distinguished career, Robert Coles, the Harvard child psychiatrist, has written several well-regarded books and a prolific stream of scholarly papers and articles. This book is a collection of his popular articles--book reviews, memoirs, essays and musings from publications like the New Yorker, the New England Journal of Medicine, the New Republic, Commonweal and the New York Review of Books, among others (some of which are not so easily accessible). Coles is wise, thoughtful and soft-spoken.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2002 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the annals of the Roman Catholic Church in America, there has been no greater crisis in modern times than this year's sexual abuse scandal. From its epicenter in Boston, shock waves rippled across the country, reaching Los Angeles and other U.S. dioceses, toppling priests from their pulpits and even retirements, and focusing unprecedented popular anger at bishops themselves. If Boston was the epicenter, the seismic shock behind the tremor was the Boston Globe.
HEALTH
November 29, 1999 | SHARI ROAN
The girls' empowerment movement is one of the most positive public health trends in the country these days, and the multitude of health books for girls is proof. It's possible to find a good book for a girl on almost any aspect of physical or psychological health. Some of the latest offerings include two new books from Pleasant Co., which has set the standard for girls' health with its American Girl magazine and library of books.
SPORTS
May 4, 1999 | THOMAS BONK
What: "The Majors," by John Feinstein (Little Brown and Co., $25) Because the professional golf season stretches from the week after New Year's Day to just before Christmas, it has grown increasingly difficult to tell one tournament from another, or which is more important--the Greater Greensboro Chrysler Classic or the Shell Houston Open. The answer, of course, is that nothing really matters as much as the major championships--the Masters, the U.S. Open, the British Open and the PGA.
NEWS
April 20, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mas perdida que Eva en el dia de Madre is how my Peruvian friend Augusto used to describe a young friend of ours--more lost than Eve on Mother's Day. This surely was the state Lisa St. Aubin de Teran found herself on the day she arrived at the Hacienda Santa Rite near the village of Mendoza Fria in Amazonian Venezuela. At the age of 17, Lisa had abandoned her studies for her Oxbridge exams to marry a Latin American 20 years her senior.
BOOKS
August 17, 1997 | DICK LOCHTE, Dick Lochte is collaborating with former L.A. prosecutor Christopher Darden on a new series of legal thrillers for Warner Books
"Chandler with onions" is the way novelist Ross Macdonald described one of his earliest short stories, adding, "but then Chandler himself is Hammett with Freud potatoes. As Dostoevsky said about Gogol (I think), we all came out from under Hammett's black mask." Forty-five years after Macdonald issued that summation, it remains valid. Today's hard-edged crime novels range far and wide in style and content, from George P. Pelecanos' "King Suckerman," which revels in the excesses of mid-1970s masculine lifestyles, to Wendy Hornsby's "A Hard Light," a generally unvarnished portrait of a modern woman at the crossroads.
BOOKS
April 10, 1994 | Robert Ward, Robert Ward's most recent novel, "The King of Cards," has just appeared in paperback from Washington Square Press
When The Times called and asked me to review this novel I was wary, because I doubted that the book itself could live up to the fantastic hype surrounding its sale. If the name Allan Folsom doesn't ring a bell, his story probably will. About a year and half ago there were a lot of items in every paper about Folsom, a failed screenwriter, who had toiled in the Hollywood coal mines for years and years with only a couple of episodes of some long forgotten TV show to his credit.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Netherlands Publisher to Buy Time Warner Unit: Wolters Kluwer, one of the largest publishers in the Netherlands, said it agreed to buy the professional publishing division of Time Warner Inc.'s Little, Brown & Co. unit for undisclosed terms. Boston-based Little Brown, with 140 employees and sales of about $50 million, publishes medical and legal texts, journals and reference books. Wolters Kluwer, with about $2.
BOOKS
February 11, 1996 | David Kipen, David Kipen is a copy editor at Variety
It takes a special kind of nerve to write a book with roughly the mass of a medicine ball and then end it so abruptly and unsatisfactorily that the poor reader perversely finds himself wishing it longer. But David Foster Wallace's coda disappoints only because the preceding 3 1/2 inches of "Infinite Jest" have succeeded so well at projecting a world of brain-scalding complexity.
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