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Little India Neighborhood

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FOOD
March 22, 2013 | By Jonathan Gold, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
A few months ago, a colleague invited me to dinner at Newport Beach's Tamarind of London, which he considered probably the best Indian restaurant in Southern California, a full-fledged satellite of a Mayfair restaurant that had been among the first kitchens ever to win a Michelin star for its Indian cuisine. I had been to the London original about a decade ago, and while I had been more impressed by the clubby plushness of Cinnamon and the direct, vibrant flavors at Rasa and the late Kastoori, I was impressed by the Mayfair Tamarind and its frank attempt to produce Indian food with the sheen and polish of white-tablecloth European cuisine.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1993 | MATTHEW HELLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the Namaste U.S.A. store on Lankershim Boulevard, the shelves feature Indian foods ranging from lotus root syrup to shredded mango preserve, but the most popular fare are the Indian movie videos stashed behind the counter. Store owner Zulfiqar Ali Engineer said the store has between 450 and 500 regular movie-rental customers, a number that continues to increase.
FOOD
May 28, 1992 | JONATHAN GOLD
The restaurant Rajdoot marks the northern edge of Artesia's Little India neighborhood, the Pioneer Boulevard drag of sari merchants and jewelry joints, Indian music stores and posters that advertise Parsi-Gujarati spectaculars. Indian snack shops, Indian fast-food places, and fragrant grocery stores well stocked with fresh turmeric abound. In this part of town, samosas are as common as tacos, turbans as frequently seen as cowboy hats in Texas.
NEWS
November 20, 1997 | KYLE RODERICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Totally unglamorous yet aesthetically urgent, facial depilation can be hair-raising in more ways than one. Although most women would prefer to avoid the subject, facial hair removal tops the list of most common and least enjoyable beauty treatments. Shaving requires vigilance beyond most women's inclinations, while plucking can cause nicks and scars, and waxing's side effects may include burns, rashes or blemishes.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2005 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
This summer's must-have fashion item is a style of skirt that has everything going for it -- except maybe a name that everyone can agree on. Indian? Prairie? Gypsy? Bohemian? Bollywood? By whatever name, the flouncy, colorful skirts inspired by fashions in India have had manufacturers and retailers rushing to keep up with demand. Miss Chievous Inc., which set up shop in downtown Los Angeles in November, started making the skirts just as the Indian fashion trend was about to explode.
FOOD
January 6, 1994 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a three-month stay in Southern California, Parvathy Sathyamurthy cooked just as she would at home in Bombay. Supermarkets supplied almost everything she needed, and special ingredients such as urad dal (lentils) and fenugreek seeds were readily available in Artesia's little India neighborhood. Sathyamurthy was here to see her daughter and son-in-law, Janaky and Hariharan B. Iyer of La Habra, and their daughter Easha, 2 1/2.
TRAVEL
July 23, 1995 | MARK JENKINS, Jenkins is an author, free-lance writer and television producer.
If you're a food lover, the tiny, multiethnic city-state of Singapore is the most exciting travel destination on Earth. Admittedly, I'm biased--I was born, raised and fattened up on that Southeast Asian island. But it's a reasonable bias. The food here is plentiful, inexpensive, diverse, of high quality, and there are strict hygiene standards (Draconian health laws ensure you are safe eating in the most ramshackle food stall.) Singaporeans themselves are food mad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2004 | Richard Fausset and Megan Garvey, Times Staff Writers
Orlantha Ambrose adopted Sri Lanka, the land of her parents, as her home. Despite their concerns, the 33-year-old former kindergarten teacher moved from Encino to Colombo more than a year ago to teach poor children to play the violin. That mission drew her parents to Sri Lanka to see the culmination of her work: a holiday concert by her students. On Sunday, Ambrose and her mother, Beulah, were among the thousands swept away by the tsunami that ravaged the island nation.
TRAVEL
February 25, 1990 | JENNIFER RODRIGO, Rodrigo is a free-lance writer living in Kuala Lumpur.
It is still dark. The moon, partially obscured by clouds, offers little light. Stars flicker vaguely in the sky. Street lights cast long, thin shadows on the streets. Swallows flit by, seeking food. Kuala Lumpur has begun to stir. Like other Asian cities, "K.L.," as it is known to residents, is lurching into the 21th Century, grabbing for the tail of a speeding global economy.
MAGAZINE
March 17, 2002 | JONATHAN KANDELL
When I started visiting Southeast Asia more than three decades ago, it was still a notorious destination for Westerners in search of cheap narcotics. Novels and films depicted degenerate Europeans and Americans holed up in dingy hotel rooms in an opium stupor. Today there is a new wave of Western addicts in this part of the world.
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