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Little Tokyo

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1998 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese tourists by the hundreds still come to Los Angeles' Little Tokyo every day to browse, take pictures, eat and shop, but they don't spend much money anymore. Gone are the days when sleepy-eyed honeymooners just off the plane arrived in Little Tokyo on tour buses, and in the course of 40 minutes at Weller Court gleefully bought $2,000 worth of Ferragamo and Bally handbags and shoes--and even found time for a bowl of noodles or curry rice before returning to the bus.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Esmeralda Bermudez
Dassler Jimenez stood on a busy stretch of Western Avenue in East Hollywood, ready to plant a flag and call it "Little Venezuela. " Never mind that none of his countrymen live or own businesses in the neighborhood - or the fact that Jimenez has no money to finance the effort and little clue how to make it happen. "If the Armenians and the Koreans did it," Jimenez said, "why can't we?" Jimenez and other Latino leaders have teamed up to promote a common goal: carving out islands for their communities in Los Angeles' jumbled landscape - Peru Village, Little Venezuela, Paseo Colombia, Guatemalan Mayan Village, Oaxacan Corridor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Esmeralda Bermudez
Dassler Jimenez stood on a busy stretch of Western Avenue in East Hollywood, ready to plant a flag and call it "Little Venezuela. " Never mind that none of his countrymen live or own businesses in the neighborhood - or the fact that Jimenez has no money to finance the effort and little clue how to make it happen. "If the Armenians and the Koreans did it," Jimenez said, "why can't we?" Jimenez and other Latino leaders have teamed up to promote a common goal: carving out islands for their communities in Los Angeles' jumbled landscape - Peru Village, Little Venezuela, Paseo Colombia, Guatemalan Mayan Village, Oaxacan Corridor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Zac Efron was involved in an altercation with transients in downtown L.A. in the wee hours on Sunday, and as with most things that happen in the big city after midnight, the details are, well, fuzzy. First, here's what police said on the record: Efron and a friend were waiting at Temple Street near the 110 Freeway when officers were flagged to the area by a third party, L.A. Now reported. The cops arrived around 2:30 a.m. and found evidence of an altercation. A police spokesman had no other details about what had gone down, but authorities confirmed that the "High School Musical" star had tangled with at least one transient after becoming "stranded" in the sketchy area.
HOME & GARDEN
August 23, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Love lettuce wraps. Love burritos. Love the crumbs you clean from the toaster just before it's about to catch fire. So when it comes to food, I am not picky. I bust my tail - in the pool, on the trails - six days a week just to be able to eat everything within view. Otherwise I would have the same circumference as the late James Gandolfini. As Mark Twain said, "Go to heaven for the climate, hell for the company. " Pick your reason, the 21st century will go down as one of extremism.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Robert Greene
South Los Angeles is playing a leading role in the city's movement toward healthier living and complete streets. That's something that Tafarai Bayne of TRUST South L.A. wanted to make clear Sunday as cyclists were about to begin a ride from Watts to the north end of Central Avenue in Little Tokyo. “My mom raised me as a vegetarian in South L.A.,” he said, “growing food in our backyard. The healthy lifestyle has existed in South L.A. for quite some time. But we haven't always had the support we need in terms of infrastructure.” The purpose of the ride was twofold: to highlight the portions of the avenue that are pocked with potholes or where cyclists could benefit from bike lanes, and to spotlight the storied avenue's cultural landmarks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2013 | Frank Shyong
In its heyday, Empress Pavilion fielded an army of 100 employees that brought the restaurant to life at dawn; a crew of 20 prep cooks chopped vegetables, wrapped dumplings and crimped shumai. When doors opened at 9 a.m., a squadron of waitresses armed with steam carts fanned out across a vast 600-seat dining room, hawking tins of black bean spare rib and har gow in three languages. The wait to get in could last two hours. Empress Pavilion -- behind on rent and struggling to find customers -- closed earlier this summer, the latest blow in Chinatown's three decades of slow decline.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Zac Efron was involved in an altercation with transients in downtown L.A. in the wee hours on Sunday, and as with most things that happen in the big city after midnight, the details are, well, fuzzy. First, here's what police said on the record: Efron and a friend were waiting at Temple Street near the 110 Freeway when officers were flagged to the area by a third party, L.A. Now reported. The cops arrived around 2:30 a.m. and found evidence of an altercation. A police spokesman had no other details about what had gone down, but authorities confirmed that the "High School Musical" star had tangled with at least one transient after becoming "stranded" in the sketchy area.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The competitive, often territorial world of street art has long been male-dominated. Increasingly, however, women artists are adding a distinct sensibility to the street art scene that, in Los Angeles and other cities, includes yarn bombing (or graffiti knitting) and sculptural installations as well as traditional murals. At Daniel Lahoda's downtown LALA Gallery, original paintings, prints and sculptures by more than a dozen women street artists are the focus of a new exhibition opening Aug. 9. Some participants are internationally known, such as Tokyo native Lady Aiko, now living in Brooklyn, and New York-based Swoon, who was part of MOCA's 2011 "Art in the Streets" show.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
A week or so ago, on my way to meet a friend in Little Tokyo, I stopped into Bunkado on 1st Street, where I found a copy of Paul Reps and Nyogen Senzaki's “Zen Flesh, Zen Bones.” Bunkado is my favorite store in Little Tokyo, in part for its variety (tea sets, flower arrangement guides, sake decanters) but even more so for the shelf of Japanese-themed books at the front. Ninety years ago, another store called Bunkado - a bookstore affiliated with a small publishing house called Sodosha - occupied the cultural center of Little Tokyo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By David Zahniser
Nearly a decade ago, Enrique Ramirez welcomed the opening of a light-rail station in Little Tokyo, just a quick walk from his Mexican seafood restaurant. The Metro Gold Line station delivered a steady stream of customers to Senor Fish, especially on weekends. But now, with the region's rail system expanding again, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority is pushing him out. On Saturday, Senor Fish abandoned its location at the corner of 1st and Alameda streets. And later this year, Metro is set to demolish the property's two brick buildings, which are located across the street from the Japanese American National Museum and have played an important role in the cultural life of the neighborhood for decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2014 | By Jason La
Camille Aligue photographed Japanese Village Plaza in Little Tokyo on Jan. 5. "I was originally taking a photo of something else and I had my back turned to this scene, but then I turned around and saw this!" Aligue said. She used a Canon Rebel EOS T3. Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers. Share your photos on our  Flickr page  or  reader submission gallery .  Follow us on Twitter  or visit  latimes.com/socalmoments  for more on this photo series.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
A week or so ago, on my way to meet a friend in Little Tokyo, I stopped into Bunkado on 1st Street, where I found a copy of Paul Reps and Nyogen Senzaki's “Zen Flesh, Zen Bones.” Bunkado is my favorite store in Little Tokyo, in part for its variety (tea sets, flower arrangement guides, sake decanters) but even more so for the shelf of Japanese-themed books at the front. Ninety years ago, another store called Bunkado - a bookstore affiliated with a small publishing house called Sodosha - occupied the cultural center of Little Tokyo.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Robert Greene
South Los Angeles is playing a leading role in the city's movement toward healthier living and complete streets. That's something that Tafarai Bayne of TRUST South L.A. wanted to make clear Sunday as cyclists were about to begin a ride from Watts to the north end of Central Avenue in Little Tokyo. “My mom raised me as a vegetarian in South L.A.,” he said, “growing food in our backyard. The healthy lifestyle has existed in South L.A. for quite some time. But we haven't always had the support we need in terms of infrastructure.” The purpose of the ride was twofold: to highlight the portions of the avenue that are pocked with potholes or where cyclists could benefit from bike lanes, and to spotlight the storied avenue's cultural landmarks.
HOME & GARDEN
August 23, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Love lettuce wraps. Love burritos. Love the crumbs you clean from the toaster just before it's about to catch fire. So when it comes to food, I am not picky. I bust my tail - in the pool, on the trails - six days a week just to be able to eat everything within view. Otherwise I would have the same circumference as the late James Gandolfini. As Mark Twain said, "Go to heaven for the climate, hell for the company. " Pick your reason, the 21st century will go down as one of extremism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2013 | Frank Shyong
In its heyday, Empress Pavilion fielded an army of 100 employees that brought the restaurant to life at dawn; a crew of 20 prep cooks chopped vegetables, wrapped dumplings and crimped shumai. When doors opened at 9 a.m., a squadron of waitresses armed with steam carts fanned out across a vast 600-seat dining room, hawking tins of black bean spare rib and har gow in three languages. The wait to get in could last two hours. Empress Pavilion -- behind on rent and struggling to find customers -- closed earlier this summer, the latest blow in Chinatown's three decades of slow decline.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2011
EVENTS At the Japanese American National Museum's docent-led Little Tokyo Walking Tour, history buffs can explore the neighborhood's past and learn about its present. Museum admission is included. JANM, 369 E. 1st St., L.A. 10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Sat. $14. (213) 625-0414. http://www.janm.org.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1985
In his article (Sept. 4), "Old Temple, Church Symbolize Efforts to Preserve Little Tokyo," David Holley did a great job of telling about efforts being made to save the block of buildings along 1st Street between San Pedro and Central. His many short interviews of the people who have small stores along 1st Street gave the article special life. To some, all the time and money needed to save the block may seem like a big waste, but given Holley's article, I hope more people will realize how important saving that section of Little Tokyo is. As Calvin Hamilton, city planning director, said, the block is "very important psychologically and emotionally to the Japanese community."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The competitive, often territorial world of street art has long been male-dominated. Increasingly, however, women artists are adding a distinct sensibility to the street art scene that, in Los Angeles and other cities, includes yarn bombing (or graffiti knitting) and sculptural installations as well as traditional murals. At Daniel Lahoda's downtown LALA Gallery, original paintings, prints and sculptures by more than a dozen women street artists are the focus of a new exhibition opening Aug. 9. Some participants are internationally known, such as Tokyo native Lady Aiko, now living in Brooklyn, and New York-based Swoon, who was part of MOCA's 2011 "Art in the Streets" show.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Los Angeles can be tough on newcomers, particularly among musicians. A key figure in the fertile Chicago jazz scene and member of the groundbreaking indie band Tortoise, guitarist Jeff Parker is midway through a relocation to L.A. that has found him straddling two cities during the last few months. Though Parker never wanted for gigs in a city that found him collaborating with musicians who included the late saxophonist Fred Anderson, vibraphonist Jason Adasiewicz and flutist Nicole Mitchell, Los Angeles has proved to be a bit of a challenge so far. "There's so many great musicians out here, man....
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