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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996
They are simple photographs that chronicle the history of Japanese Americans in Little Tokyo: groundbreakings, opening ceremonies, celebrities and visits by foreign dignitaries. Boxes of these pictures and negatives, accumulated over more than 30 years, were donated Thursday to the Japanese American National Museum.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996
They are simple photographs that chronicle the history of Japanese Americans in Little Tokyo: groundbreakings, opening ceremonies, celebrities and visits by foreign dignitaries. Boxes of these pictures and negatives, accumulated over more than 30 years, were donated Thursday to the Japanese American National Museum.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brass plaques in the 1st Street sidewalk of Little Tokyo now bear images of Japanese American life: Suitcases for trips to America and to World War II internment camps. The wooden bucket used to pickle delicacies. The fancy envelope for celebratory gifts. An apple pie. Apple pie? What's that doing in the new 1,000-foot-long art project aimed at memorializing the historic block and encouraging its revival?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brass plaques in the 1st Street sidewalk of Little Tokyo now bear images of Japanese American life: Suitcases for trips to America and to World War II internment camps. The wooden bucket used to pickle delicacies. The fancy envelope for celebratory gifts. An apple pie. Apple pie? What's that doing in the new 1,000-foot-long art project aimed at memorializing the historic block and encouraging its revival?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1991 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a decade, Archie Miyatake had dreamed of building a permanent showcase for the thousands of pictures that his late father, noted Japanese-American photographer Toyo Miyatake, took during the nearly 60 years that he ran a studio in Little Tokyo. On Friday, in a parking lot on 1st Street, an ancient Shinto ceremony marked the first step toward fulfillment of that dream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1991 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a decade, Archie Miyatake had dreamed of building a permanent showcase for the thousands of pictures that his late father, noted Japanese-American photographer Toyo Miyatake, took during the nearly 60 years that he ran a studio in Little Tokyo. On Friday, in a parking lot on 1st Street, an ancient Shinto ceremony marked the first step toward fulfillment of that dream.
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