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Liu Binyan

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Liu Binyan, the Chinese writer and intellectual who was stranded in the United States by China's 1989 crackdown on dissidents after the student pro-democracy uprising in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, has died. He was 80. Liu died Monday of colon cancer at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, N.J., said Cecilia Alvear, who was a Nieman Fellow with Liu at Harvard University.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Liu Binyan, the Chinese writer and intellectual who was stranded in the United States by China's 1989 crackdown on dissidents after the student pro-democracy uprising in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, has died. He was 80. Liu died Monday of colon cancer at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, N.J., said Cecilia Alvear, who was a Nieman Fellow with Liu at Harvard University.
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NEWS
April 4, 1988 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
History has not been especially kind to Liu Binyan. He is an author and muckraking journalist. But for much of his adult life he was not allowed to write, report or publish. Instead he planted rice, wheat and corn, made bricks, built houses, swept floors and cleaned toilets. He is a dedicated Marxist. But he has been expelled from the Chinese Communist Party--twice. During China's Cultural Revolution, he was even accused of spying for the Soviet Union. Yet Liu has--in his own way--prospered.
BOOKS
December 23, 1990 | Carolyn Wakeman, Wakeman teaches in the Graduate School of Journalism, University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of "To the Storm: The Odyssey of a Revolutionary Chinese Woman."
Shen Tong was at home in central Beijing, just footsteps from the stretch of Changan Avenue that would see the heaviest casualties, when the shooting began on the night of June 3, 1989. For a moment, like many others, he assumed that the soldiers spraying gunfire were using rubber bullets. Then came the intolerable recognition. "People who had been hit fell to the ground and lay still. 'Those people are dead,' I thought to myself. 'The bullets are real.' I couldn't believe it. It was as if this were all happening in a dream."
BOOKS
April 29, 1990 | John H. Boyle, Boyle, professor of Asian history at California State University, Chino, is author of "China and Japan at War, 1937-1945." and
"Whenever he writes something, chaos ensues." The complaint is registered by a distressed bureaucrat who has fallen victim to the expose journalism of China's most widely read and respected author, Liu Binyan. Liu, presently in exile in the West, has been an "investigative reporter" in a country where that phrase is close to an oxymoron. In the People's Republic of China, journalists know that the word propaganda has no negative connotation, at least not in officialdom.
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a secondary school student in pre-revolutionary China, Liu Binyan was bored by classes in the Confucian classics and would secretly read books of his own choosing at his desk in the back of the schoolroom. Russian writers were his favorites--Gorki, Tolstoy, Dostoevski and Turgenev in particular. They satisfied his rebellious spirit and yearnings for social justice in a way that the time-honored writings of Confucius never could.
BOOKS
December 23, 1990 | Carolyn Wakeman, Wakeman teaches in the Graduate School of Journalism, University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of "To the Storm: The Odyssey of a Revolutionary Chinese Woman."
Shen Tong was at home in central Beijing, just footsteps from the stretch of Changan Avenue that would see the heaviest casualties, when the shooting began on the night of June 3, 1989. For a moment, like many others, he assumed that the soldiers spraying gunfire were using rubber bullets. Then came the intolerable recognition. "People who had been hit fell to the ground and lay still. 'Those people are dead,' I thought to myself. 'The bullets are real.' I couldn't believe it. It was as if this were all happening in a dream."
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Liu Binyan, the muckraking journalist whose expulsion from the Chinese Communist Party was a key event in a crackdown on intellectual freedom early last year, will leave here today and spend the next 14 months at UCLA and Harvard. Granting permission to Liu to travel abroad appears to mark his partial rehabilitation and to reflect the emergence over the last few months of a somewhat more relaxed atmosphere for Chinese intellectual and cultural life.
NEWS
January 10, 1987 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
There are two kinds of loyalties in this world. One is exposed to risks, while the other is safe. --Liu Binyan, 1985 Liu Binyan is one of the most famous writers in China. His works blend together the style of the novelist with the subject matter of a muckraking reporter.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
Liu Binyan, one of China's leading writers, was formally expelled from the Communist Party on Saturday, and a Chinese source reported that authorities have placed him under guard or house arrest. Over the past eight years, Liu, 61, had written a series of novel-length works criticizing systemic local corruption within the Communist Party and the party's insistence on absolute obedience. In an official expulsion order, the party attacked Liu's writings.
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a secondary school student in pre-revolutionary China, Liu Binyan was bored by classes in the Confucian classics and would secretly read books of his own choosing at his desk in the back of the schoolroom. Russian writers were his favorites--Gorki, Tolstoy, Dostoevski and Turgenev in particular. They satisfied his rebellious spirit and yearnings for social justice in a way that the time-honored writings of Confucius never could.
BOOKS
April 29, 1990 | John H. Boyle, Boyle, professor of Asian history at California State University, Chino, is author of "China and Japan at War, 1937-1945." and
"Whenever he writes something, chaos ensues." The complaint is registered by a distressed bureaucrat who has fallen victim to the expose journalism of China's most widely read and respected author, Liu Binyan. Liu, presently in exile in the West, has been an "investigative reporter" in a country where that phrase is close to an oxymoron. In the People's Republic of China, journalists know that the word propaganda has no negative connotation, at least not in officialdom.
NEWS
April 4, 1988 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
History has not been especially kind to Liu Binyan. He is an author and muckraking journalist. But for much of his adult life he was not allowed to write, report or publish. Instead he planted rice, wheat and corn, made bricks, built houses, swept floors and cleaned toilets. He is a dedicated Marxist. But he has been expelled from the Chinese Communist Party--twice. During China's Cultural Revolution, he was even accused of spying for the Soviet Union. Yet Liu has--in his own way--prospered.
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Liu Binyan, the muckraking journalist whose expulsion from the Chinese Communist Party was a key event in a crackdown on intellectual freedom early last year, will leave here today and spend the next 14 months at UCLA and Harvard. Granting permission to Liu to travel abroad appears to mark his partial rehabilitation and to reflect the emergence over the last few months of a somewhat more relaxed atmosphere for Chinese intellectual and cultural life.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
Liu Binyan, one of China's leading writers, was formally expelled from the Communist Party on Saturday, and a Chinese source reported that authorities have placed him under guard or house arrest. Over the past eight years, Liu, 61, had written a series of novel-length works criticizing systemic local corruption within the Communist Party and the party's insistence on absolute obedience. In an official expulsion order, the party attacked Liu's writings.
NEWS
January 10, 1987 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
There are two kinds of loyalties in this world. One is exposed to risks, while the other is safe. --Liu Binyan, 1985 Liu Binyan is one of the most famous writers in China. His works blend together the style of the novelist with the subject matter of a muckraking reporter.
NEWS
January 13, 1987 | United Press International
Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping and other officials avoided comment today on the status of Communist Party chief Hu Yaobang, fueling speculation he is in trouble in the wake of student pro-democracy demonstrations. A Chinese source, echoing reports by the Italian Communist Party newspaper L'Unita and the Yugoslav news agency Tanjug, said Hu is expected to be replaced by Premier Zhao Ziyang as party chief at the organization's 13th Party Congress in October.
BOOKS
October 9, 1988 | JAMES RAGAN, Ragan, a poet and playwright, is currently traveling in China, where one of his plays is being produced.
Since the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949, a new revolutionary rationale has infiltrated an old-culture consciousness. China is in transition--economically, socially, and politically--but nowhere are the changes more dramatic than in its literature. Reconstruction of old artistic forms and spiritual values battles to be the norm, while modernism as defined by Western sensibilities incubates on the brink of creation.
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