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Liu Qing

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NEWS
May 9, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two prominent Chinese dissidents whose cases had become a sore point in Sino-U.S. relations have been granted permission to leave China, a visiting State Department official announced here Friday. Arnold L. Kanter, undersecretary for political affairs, said at a news conference that Chinese officials told him exit permits have been granted to Han Dongfang and Liu Qing. Both are former political prisoners.
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NEWS
May 9, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two prominent Chinese dissidents whose cases had become a sore point in Sino-U.S. relations have been granted permission to leave China, a visiting State Department official announced here Friday. Arnold L. Kanter, undersecretary for political affairs, said at a news conference that Chinese officials told him exit permits have been granted to Han Dongfang and Liu Qing. Both are former political prisoners.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1989 | DON SHIRLEY
Le Cirque du Soleil opened at the Santa Monica Pier last month minus one of its star attractions, the Shandong Troupe of China. Cirque representatives blamed red tape in China for the no-show. Well, the "rola-bola" troupe has finally arrived--in high style. This quartet of teen-agers draws some of the biggest applause of the show. The set-up for the act looks deceptively simple--a small dinette-set table is brought on stage along with a cylinder and a board.
NEWS
April 20, 1998 | JIM MANN
Major Chinese dissidents who have been freed during the 1990s, their dates of release, their destinations upon release, and subsequent actions by the United States that were apparently linked to their being let go: Fang Lizhi Astrophysicist June 25, 1990 Britain (Cambridge University) U.S. drops objections to resumption of Japanese loans to China. *** Han Dongfang Founder of China's independent labor movement May 8, 1992 United States President Bush extends China's MFN status.
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman said Thursday that foreign journalists who were beaten a day earlier in Tian An Men Square were breaking the law. He cited an unknown or nonexistent law to back up his accusation.
WORLD
June 2, 2004 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
One of China's richest men was ordered by a Shanghai court Tuesday to serve three years in prison for financial fraud, a sentence that drew criticism here and abroad as being unusually light and politically influenced. The case of businessman Zhou Zhengyi -- a onetime street vendor who built a fortune in restaurants, then real estate -- drew particular attention because of his connections to one of China's biggest banks and purported ties to top political leaders in Shanghai.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1995 | LIU BINYAN and PERRY LINK, Liu Binyan, a Chinese writer, worked for many years as a reporter for the People's Daily; Perry Link teaches Chinese literature at Princeton University
Wei Jingsheng, China's famous dissident, is a courageous man and a trenchant thinker. He has also had the bad luck of being a convenient pawn for the political purposes of the high barons of Chinese communism. In 1979, he was sentenced to 15 years in prison and served more than 14. After six months on parole, he was held for another 20 months in extralegal detention. This week, he was sentenced to a second term of 14 years in prison.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
The plainclothes police seem to have faded into the background recently, but Chen Jun knows he is playing a risky game. Chen, 31, a minor participant in a pro-democracy movement that briefly swept China a decade ago, is now a highly visible point man in an effort by Chinese intellectuals to obtain the freedom of dissidents imprisoned at that time.
NEWS
November 23, 1997 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wei Jingsheng, China's most famous dissident, says the United States has been engaging in "wishful thinking" about China, whose Communist Party leadership, he claims, is trying to obtain Western technology for military purposes. "The United States seemed to be clearer about the threat from the Soviet Union. And it was also tougher with the Soviet Union," Wei said through an interpreter in an interview with The Times on Saturday, a week after being freed from a Chinese labor camp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2001 | BEI LING
The night before I was to be released from a Beijing prison in August 2000, I had a conversation with a high official in the Beijing Public Security Bureau that I will never forget. Tall, thin and well-educated, this officer had overseen the cases of many dissidents before me. For 10 hours, we sparred in a room clogged with our own cigarette smoke. Then the officer turned friendly. He told me I was to be released, to be returned to the United States the next day.
BOOKS
June 29, 1997 | PERRY LINK, Perry Link is the author of "Evening Chats in Beijing: Probing China's Predicament" and is a professor of East Asian Studies at Princeton University
Ancient Chinese metaphysics holds that things give rise to their opposites; when a trend approaches an extreme, it undermines itself and feeds a reversal. Thirty years ago, the flamboyant sights and sounds of Mao Tse-tung's Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution certainly did not seem to contain seeds of anti-Maoism.
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