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Liubov Popova

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June 19, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
V I. Lenin died of multiple brain hemorrhages on Jan. 21, 1924, in the town of Gorky. He was 53. Less than four months later, artist Liubov Sergeevna Popova died in Moscow of scarlet fever contracted from her young son who succumbed a few days earlier. She was just 35. Lenin and Popova probably never met but the connection is as intimate as that between an author and a character that inhabits his work.
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June 21, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
To understand the extraordinary significance of the work of Russian artist Liubov Popova (1889-1924), a rather intrepid leap is required. The reason is that her most startlingly original contribution came only after she repudiated easel painting. Although she painted almost all her tragically brief life, often in bold and dramatically convincing ways, Popova's fundamental achievement will be found in the designs for textiles, typography, theater sets and costumes dating from her last four years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
To understand the extraordinary significance of the work of Russian artist Liubov Popova (1889-1924), a rather intrepid leap is required. The reason is that her most startlingly original contribution came only after she repudiated easel painting. Although she painted almost all her tragically brief life, often in bold and dramatically convincing ways, Popova's fundamental achievement will be found in the designs for textiles, typography, theater sets and costumes dating from her last four years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
V I. Lenin died of multiple brain hemorrhages on Jan. 21, 1924, in the town of Gorky. He was 53. Less than four months later, artist Liubov Sergeevna Popova died in Moscow of scarlet fever contracted from her young son who succumbed a few days earlier. She was just 35. Lenin and Popova probably never met but the connection is as intimate as that between an author and a character that inhabits his work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON
In past years there was a leading indicator of the arrival of the summer season. The art scene went completely comatose like a dog dozing in the dusty sun. This is no longer true. These days our museums go into a frenzy of activity putting up splashy exhibitions for the tourist season. Then they go competely comatose. Before the end of June the County Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art will paper their walls with half a dozen major exhibitions designed to dazzle and delight.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1976, Gordon Matta-Clark was asked to participate in an exhibit showcasing work by several young architects; his response was to shoot out the windows of the exhibition space with a BB gun. That gesture was typical of Matta-Clark, a subversive maverick whose wildly original work of the '70s challenged conventional ideas about permanence and entropy, sculpture, architecture, and the American home.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"Au Moulin de la Galette," an Impressionist dance hall scene by Pierre Auguste Renoir, was purchased at auction Thursday night for $78.1 million by an anonymous telephone bidder. The sale of the Renoir painting at Sotheby's occurred 49 hours too late to establish a world auction record. It was upstaged by Tuesday night's $82.5-million sale at Christie's of Vincent van Gogh's "Portrait of Dr. Gachet" to the Kobayashi Gallery of Tokyo.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Jean-Antoine Watteau's "Reclining Nude" (circa 1713-1721) is a tiny painting, just over six inches wide and five high, but it's the one I most look forward to seeing whenever I visit the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena. Simon, who died Wednesday at 86, collected greater works--lots of them, in fact, since his collection ranks as the most extraordinary west of Chicago. But the Watteau has a special charm. In fact, the amazing company it keeps only adds to its attraction.
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times
It's difficult to say the word Constructivism, let alone explain in succinct form what this art movement, which began in Russia about 1915, is all about. If the term sounds ponderous and dull, the art is anything but. About the time that World War I began, Russian artists such as Kazimir Malevich, Vladimir Tatlin, Alexander Rodchenko and Liubov Popova were engaged in a redefinition of the nature of art. Representational painting and sculpture was rejected in favor of abstract art.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1996 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
"Sexual Politics: Judy Chicago's 'Dinner Party' in Feminist Art History" is the worst exhibition I've seen in a Los Angeles museum in many a moon. It's a shame, too, given the significance of the show's subject. Arguably, feminism has been the most influential and momentous social movement for American art since the 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
They don't make menus like they used to. At least, not like they used to in Imperial Russia. In 1883, graphic artist Victor Vasnetsov designed a menu card for a dinner composed of clear beet root soup, pies, steamed fish, veal, aspic, roasts, chicken and game, asparagus, grains with fruit and honey, and ice cream. The list of edibles is neatly printed in a simple white space occupying the lower left quadrant of a rectangular sheet.
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