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Live Nation Inc

BUSINESS
May 6, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Concert promoter Live Nation Inc. is selling three Boston venues for $22.5 million to pay down some of its debt. The Los Angeles company said it would sell the Boston Opera House, the Orpheum Theatre and the Paradise Rock Club by the third quarter. A Live Nation spokesman said the buyer was Boston Opera House Ventures. Live Nation will continue to promote concerts at the venues.
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BUSINESS
May 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Live Nation Inc. signed a 10-year agreement with rapper Jay-Z that includes live shows, recordings and millions of dollars that the performer can invest in new businesses. Jay-Z, whose given name is Shawn Carter, received options to buy 500,000 shares of Live Nation stock at $13.73 each, the Beverly Hills concert promoter disclosed in a regulatory filing. Additional financial terms are not being released, the company said.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
When Live Nation Inc. leaves Ticketmaster next year to launch its own ticketing service, it won't go alone. The concert promoter -- which was once Ticketmaster's largest client -- signed a multiyear agreement with Philadelphia-based SMG, a facilities operator that runs 216 venues including 75 arenas and nine stadiums. Live Nation says it expects to sell 25 million tickets to SMG venues over the course of the deal, beginning in late 2009, which analysts estimate could account for about $50 million in revenues for the Beverly Hills-based concert promoter.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
The gig: As the head of Sterling Venue Ventures, Lance Sterling runs the recently renovated Saban Theatre concert venue in Beverly Hills and also owns and operates the Canyon Club in Agoura Hills. Early days: Sterling, 51, studied civil engineering at the University of Arizona. While in school, he worked in bars, nightclubs and concert venues that booked groups such as Grand Funk Railroad. "I was making more money running concerts than I would as an engineer," he said. After college, he briefly worked for a billboard company and then went into the hotel business.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Lucas Cruikshank and his hyperactive Fred character had millions of YouTube fans and a line of merchandise when Hollywood came calling. Then a manager from the Collective pitched the Nebraska teenager a vision for his squeaky-voiced character that would result, three years later, in a holiday album, three made-for-TV movies, and a series on Nickelodeon. "So many people in the industry didn't know if you could take something on the Internet and cross it over to mainstream TV and movies," said Cruikshank, now 18. "It felt really good to prove them wrong.
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