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Live Oak Canyon Road

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1990
If Live Oak Canyon Road didn't exist already as the major route in and out of Trabuco Canyon, some novelist would have to conjure it up. Its canopy of twisted branches creates a tunnel effect one might expect to come across in Lewis Carroll, or encounter on a dark night in an old mystery. Its twists and turns and stately trees have inspired uncommon devotion. How many other roads have residents adopting trees, and tying their names to them?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2002 | TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blake McGill loved to laugh, loved to cook and loved to drive--fast. The popular 17-year-old El Toro High School senior often took his car into Trabuco Canyon to drive the tight curves of Live Oak Canyon Road, and early Sunday morning, that's where his life ended. McGill was heading south on Live Oak near Monastery Road when he lost control of his car shortly before 12:30 a.m., California Highway Patrol Officer Denise Quesada said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Over the protest of some Trabuco Canyon residents, county crews on Wednesday cut down four large trees that were targeted as safety hazards on a winding country road known for its canopy of old oak trees. County officials said it was necessary to make Live Oak Canyon Road, one of the most dangerous rural stretches in Orange County, safer by removing three oak trees and one sycamore sitting at the roadway's edge. The oak trees were 50 to 100 years old.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A little-noted court victory has removed a major hurdle for construction of a controversial strip mall at the edge of the Cleveland National Forest--a decision that also has fueled critics' fears that developers are gaining ground in decades-old battles over building in local canyons. Two other pending proposals--one old, one new--could add nearly 500 homes to the sparsely populated hillsides around the bucolic Cook's Corner, at El Toro and Live Oak Canyon roads, near the forest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1989
Man Killed: A male driver was killed in the Trabuco Canyon area early Sunday morning when he lost control of his vehicle and crashed into a telephone pole, according to the California Highway Patrol. The driver, whose identity was not released pending notification of relatives, was traveling south on Live Oak Canyon Road, near Hamilton Trail, at an unknown speed when he lost control. His vehicle rolled into a telephone pole about 1:45 a.m., the CHP dispatcher said. The driver was ejected and crushed by the vehicle, the dispatcher said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1995
A 20-year-old man died Saturday after crashing his car into a tree on the side of Live Oak Canyon Road south of Canyon Creek Drive, authorities said. Douglas Monnig of Trabuco Canyon was driving south on Live Oak Canyon at a high rate of speed at 12:55 a.m. when he lost control of the car and was fatally injured, according to a spokeswoman for the California Highway Patrol. A 23-year-old passenger in Monnig's car suffered minor injuries, the spokeswoman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1987
An El Toro teen-ager remained in fair condition Wednesday in the intensive care unit of a Mission Viejo hospital, one day after his car swerved from the northbound lane of Live Oak Canyon Road and collided with opposing traffic, authorities said. Trevor Rawlings, 17, was taken to Mission Community Hospital with cuts and head injuries after the 6 p.m. accident Tuesday, county Fire Department Capt. Patrick McIntosh said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1990 | GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of debate and stacks of paper work, the thorny issue of how many new homes should be built on 6,500 remote acres that hug the Cleveland National Forest may boil down to a bucolic country road that twists and turns through this tree-covered canyon. The four-mile-long stretch of rural highway--known as Live Oak Canyon Road--is covered in places by a natural canopy formed by oak trees, creating a tunnel effect that has been called one of the most beautiful rural scenes in Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1985
A Trabuco Canyon man was killed Friday night when his car went out of control on Live Oak Canyon Road and collided head-on with another vehicle, the California Highway Patrol reported. David Lozano, 22, was killed instantly in the 6:05 p.m. accident when the 1967 Volkswagen he was driving collided with a 1982 Datsun sedan driven by Bruce Young, 48, also of Trabuco Canyon, the CHP spokesman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1989
I have attended a few Planning Commission meetings on the Foothill-Trabuco area, and I am impressed by two things: Live Oak Canyon Road is a place I like to drive through when I want some peace of mind. Those in favor of "developing" the area are doing me a personal disservice. The Planning Commission is a most undemocratic institution and needs to be changed so that the residents who are threatened by speculators have an avenue to direct their government. I don't drive out of the city to see more city--more man-made objects.
NEWS
January 28, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Total time: One to two hours, depending on duration of stops. Distance: About 40 miles. Level of difficulty: Easy. * Forget the roads to Bali, Rio and Mandalay. This is the time of the year--when the blustery winds clear the skies between bouts of cloudiness--to gas up the chariot, top off the Thermos and hit the road to Orange County's canyon country. And, yes, Virginia, Orange County does have same.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1995
A 20-year-old man died Saturday after crashing his car into a tree on the side of Live Oak Canyon Road south of Canyon Creek Drive, authorities said. Douglas Monnig of Trabuco Canyon was driving south on Live Oak Canyon at a high rate of speed at 12:55 a.m. when he lost control of the car and was fatally injured, according to a spokeswoman for the California Highway Patrol. A 23-year-old passenger in Monnig's car suffered minor injuries, the spokeswoman said.
NEWS
April 7, 1994 | ANNE MICHAUD, Anne Michaud is a staff writer for The Times Orange County Edition
When you're longing for a taste of the outdoors but don't want to drive very far, O'Neill Regional Park is a good place to visit. This hilly park, home to oak and sycamore woodlands, is on Orange County's eastern border. But it seems worlds away from the bustle of Anaheim or Santa Ana. 10 to 10:20: Park inside O'Neill's lot--you'll pay a $2 fee--and walk over to Live Oak Canyon Stables, just across the road. The stables offer guided, hourlong horseback tours of the park for $20 a person.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Over the protest of some Trabuco Canyon residents, county crews on Wednesday cut down four large trees that were targeted as safety hazards on a winding country road known for its canopy of old oak trees. County officials said it was necessary to make Live Oak Canyon Road, one of the most dangerous rural stretches in Orange County, safer by removing three oak trees and one sycamore sitting at the roadway's edge. The oak trees were 50 to 100 years old.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1991 | DANA PARSONS
Cook's Corner may be as good a place as any in Orange County from which to reflect. It's a little biker bar with a fry cook, two pool tables, country music on the jukebox and sawdust on the floor. Anchored at the intersection two of the county's most prominent roads--The Way Things Used to Be and The Way They Shall Be--Cook's Corner therefore offers easy access to both.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1990
If Live Oak Canyon Road didn't exist already as the major route in and out of Trabuco Canyon, some novelist would have to conjure it up. Its canopy of twisted branches creates a tunnel effect one might expect to come across in Lewis Carroll, or encounter on a dark night in an old mystery. Its twists and turns and stately trees have inspired uncommon devotion. How many other roads have residents adopting trees, and tying their names to them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1989
Development in the Foothill-Trabuco area will affect many more people than the families who live there. Live Oak Canyon Road, with its natural canopy of oak trees, O'Neill Regional Park, the pristine canyons and ridgelines have long served as places of respite from the stresses and strains of urban life for all Orange Countians. Now, more than ever, with open space everywhere rapidly diminishing, such sanctuary is sorely needed. An arterial highway on Rose Canyon Road to serve proposed residential development, massive church complexes, shopping centers and housing tracts will destroy that sanctuary irretrievably.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1990 | GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of debate and stacks of paper work, the thorny issue of how many new homes should be built on 6,500 remote acres that hug the Cleveland National Forest may boil down to a bucolic country road that twists and turns through this tree-covered canyon. The four-mile-long stretch of rural highway--known as Live Oak Canyon Road--is covered in places by a natural canopy formed by oak trees, creating a tunnel effect that has been called one of the most beautiful rural scenes in Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1989
Development in the Foothill-Trabuco area will affect many more people than the families who live there. Live Oak Canyon Road, with its natural canopy of oak trees, O'Neill Regional Park, the pristine canyons and ridgelines have long served as places of respite from the stresses and strains of urban life for all Orange Countians. Now, more than ever, with open space everywhere rapidly diminishing, such sanctuary is sorely needed. An arterial highway on Rose Canyon Road to serve proposed residential development, massive church complexes, shopping centers and housing tracts will destroy that sanctuary irretrievably.
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