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March 22, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A Japanese court convicted four former executives of disgraced dot-com company Livedoor of inflating earnings reports in a scandal that destroyed one of the country's highest-flying Internet start-ups. The rulings followed Livedoor founder Takafumi Horie's conviction on similar charges last week and his prison sentence of 2 1/2 years. Horie lieutenant Ryoji Miyauchi, Livedoor's former chief financial officer, was sentenced to 20 months in prison. Three others were given suspended prison terms.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A Japanese court convicted four former executives of disgraced dot-com company Livedoor of inflating earnings reports in a scandal that destroyed one of the country's highest-flying Internet start-ups. The rulings followed Livedoor founder Takafumi Horie's conviction on similar charges last week and his prison sentence of 2 1/2 years. Horie lieutenant Ryoji Miyauchi, Livedoor's former chief financial officer, was sentenced to 20 months in prison. Three others were given suspended prison terms.
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BUSINESS
September 5, 2006 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Once an icon for a new generation of Japanese go-go capitalists, fallen Internet mogul Takafumi Horie on Monday declared himself not guilty of accusations that he masterminded a scheme to falsify corporate earnings and inflate stock prices. Speaking on the opening day of his trial, the brash entrepreneur called the case against him "full of malicious intent from the beginning" and said, "I have not carried out or instructed such crimes as were mentioned.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2007 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
The self-styled rebel of Japanese business was convicted today of breaking securities laws after a prosecution that many here saw as an attempt by the corporate establishment to snuff out a financial upstart whose only crime was his refusal to play by traditional rules. The Tokyo District Court found fallen Internet mogul Takafumi Horie guilty of misleading markets about the financial health of his Livedoor business empire to drive up its stock price. He was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in jail.
WORLD
September 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Takafumi Horie, the former CEO of the Internet firm Livedoor Co. who came to symbolize a freewheeling capitalism that challenged Japan's corporate norms, pleaded not guilty today to charges of breaking securities laws. A January raid on Livedoor sent Tokyo share prices tumbling, halting trade and rattling confidence in the world's second-largest exchange. The case embarrassed Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, who had supported Horie's unsuccessful run for parliament.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2007 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
The self-styled rebel of Japanese business was convicted today of breaking securities laws after a prosecution that many here saw as an attempt by the corporate establishment to snuff out a financial upstart whose only crime was his refusal to play by traditional rules. The Tokyo District Court found fallen Internet mogul Takafumi Horie guilty of misleading markets about the financial health of his Livedoor business empire to drive up its stock price. He was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in jail.
WORLD
March 31, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The entire leadership of Japan's biggest opposition party will step down after a party member falsely accused the son of a ruling party leader of financial links with disgraced Internet company Livedoor, news reports said today. Seiji Maehara, head of the Democratic Party of Japan, and his secretary general, Yukio Hatoyama, told colleagues that they would resign, Kyodo News agency and national broadcaster NHK reported.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2006 | From Reuters
Japan's best-known shareholder activist, fund manager Yoshiaki Murakami, said today that he expected to be charged with insider trading and would resign immediately from his fund. Murakami said that after discussions with prosecutors he had decided that his actions in connection with a high-profile takeover battle last year initiated by Livedoor Co., a scandal-hit Internet firm, could be interpreted as having violated securities trading laws.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2006 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Once an icon for a new generation of Japanese go-go capitalists, fallen Internet mogul Takafumi Horie on Monday declared himself not guilty of accusations that he masterminded a scheme to falsify corporate earnings and inflate stock prices. Speaking on the opening day of his trial, the brash entrepreneur called the case against him "full of malicious intent from the beginning" and said, "I have not carried out or instructed such crimes as were mentioned.
WORLD
September 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Takafumi Horie, the former CEO of the Internet firm Livedoor Co. who came to symbolize a freewheeling capitalism that challenged Japan's corporate norms, pleaded not guilty today to charges of breaking securities laws. A January raid on Livedoor sent Tokyo share prices tumbling, halting trade and rattling confidence in the world's second-largest exchange. The case embarrassed Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, who had supported Horie's unsuccessful run for parliament.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2006 | From Reuters
Japan's best-known shareholder activist, fund manager Yoshiaki Murakami, said today that he expected to be charged with insider trading and would resign immediately from his fund. Murakami said that after discussions with prosecutors he had decided that his actions in connection with a high-profile takeover battle last year initiated by Livedoor Co., a scandal-hit Internet firm, could be interpreted as having violated securities trading laws.
WORLD
March 31, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The entire leadership of Japan's biggest opposition party will step down after a party member falsely accused the son of a ruling party leader of financial links with disgraced Internet company Livedoor, news reports said today. Seiji Maehara, head of the Democratic Party of Japan, and his secretary general, Yukio Hatoyama, told colleagues that they would resign, Kyodo News agency and national broadcaster NHK reported.
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