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Liver Disease

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1991
A homeless man was found lying dead on the sidewalk in downtown San Diego on Tuesday morning. Authorities determined he died of liver disease. The man, who has not yet been identified, apparently made the area of 7th Avenue and Broadway his home. He was found dead at 7:30 a.m., after being recognized by the officers who regularly patrol the region, police spokesman Bill Robinson said. The man's death was not associated with the sudden drop in temperatures the night that he died, Robinson said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
April 12, 2014 | Melissa Healy
Twenty-five years after scientists first identified the hepatitis C virus, doctors are declaring victory over an infection that afflicts more than 3 million Americans and kills more of them than HIV. In a series of clinical trial results, a new generation of antiviral medications was able to clear the liver-ravaging virus from virtually all patients' bloodstreams in as little as eight weeks. Even in patients with the most stubborn infections, the new drugs were capable of suppressing the virus completely at rates well over 90%. The treatments, however, come with a steep price tag. The "sustained virologic responses" reported in the trials typically mean an infection has been permanently cleared.
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HEALTH
December 19, 2005 | Elena Conis
The spindly, yellow-flowered Bupleurum chinense and some closely related species are key herbs in traditional Chinese medicine prescribed for mood swings and gastrointestinal conditions. The root of the plant is one of the main ingredients in an herbal formula widely known by its Japanese name, Sho-saiko-to -- in Chinese it's known as xiao chai hu tang -- that contains ginseng, licorice, ginger and a handful of other herbs in addition to Bupleurum.
SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
The number of Americans who are infected with hepatitis C is falling, but that's probably because more people who have been sickened by the virus are dying as a result, government researchers reported Monday. After analyzing data from thousands of people who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that about 1% of the population over age 5 have hepatitis C. If so, that would translate to 2.68 million people with the virus, known as HCV. In addition, the researchers estimated that 900,000 additional people once had the liver disease but no longer have an active infection.
NEWS
August 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
The maker of Liverite dietary supplements is settling federal charges that it falsely claimed its products could work wonders, from preventing such serious liver diseases as cirrhosis and hepatitis to curing hangovers. Liverite Products Inc., based in Tustin, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2002
Dame Sheila Sherlock, 83, a leading authority on liver disease who established study of the liver as a distinct discipline, died of undisclosed causes Dec. 30 at her home in London. Sherlock studied medicine at Edinburgh University and graduated at the top of her class in 1941. In 1951, at age 33, she became the youngest woman elected a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians.
NEWS
January 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
James Earl Ray, the jailed assassin of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., was hospitalized again over the weekend with chronic liver disease. Ray was taken to Nashville Memorial Hospital late Saturday in critical condition. His condition was upgraded to serious Sunday evening, hospital spokeswoman Freda Herndon said. Ray's lawyer, William Pepper, said earlier this month that Ray would die within months unless he gets a liver transplant.
NEWS
September 21, 2003 | Michael Virtanen, Associated Press Writer
In the brightly lit room at New England Medical Center, John already wore faded teal scrubs when I returned from dinner. He had his Docksiders on too. "I remembered what Dad told me," he said wryly. "Keep your shoes." Our father hadn't cared much for hospitals and had tried to slip out once or twice. He died in 1994 from Alzheimer's disease, only months after my brother's diagnosis with primary sclerosing cholangitis, the illness now destroying John's liver. At 6 a.m.
HEALTH
September 3, 2001 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Two years after the supplement SAMe was introduced in the United States as a potential, but never proved, remedy for depression and arthritis, researchers may have found a condition it actually helps--chronic liver disease. Such disease, especially liver disease caused by alcoholism, currently has few effective treatments, so the possibility is generating enthusiasm among researchers and physicians alike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1992 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The autopsy of a man who collapsed and died after fighting with Los Angeles officers at a Reseda police station revealed that injuries he suffered during the struggle contributed to his death but were not the main cause, the Los Angeles County coroner's office said. Luis Zeledon, 36, of Reseda struggled with police after he tried to choke one officer at the West Valley Division Jail on May 15. Zeledon had been arrested after drinking and fighting with a roommate in a Reseda apartment.
WORLD
December 12, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - Jang Sung Taek, the uncle by marriage of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, was executed Friday for attempting to seize power for himself, the country's official news service reported early Friday. In a rambling report, the Korea Central News Agency denounced the “despicable human scum Jang, who was worse than a dog" and said that he had attempted to “overthrow the state by all sorts of intrigues and despicable methods with a wild ambition to grab the supreme power.” The execution is the first by North Korea in decades of a top echelon official and raises questions about the stability of the increasingly erratic government.
SCIENCE
June 12, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
More than a quarter of L.A.'s homeless adults are infected with the hepatitis C virus, and nearly half of them don't know it, UCLA researchers reported this week. Almost none of them have been treated for the infection, suggesting that the public health system could face a major financial burden as their infections progress to cirrhosis of the liver and end-stage liver disease. The hepatitis C virus, known as HCV, represents a potentially lethal infection. It is transmitted through the blood, primarily by needles used for injecting drugs.
SCIENCE
May 18, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In an age of long commutes, late sports practices, endless workdays and 24/7 television programming, the image of Mom hanging up her dish towel at 7 p.m. and declaring "the kitchen is closed" seems a quaint relic of an earlier era. It also harks back to a thinner America. And that may be no coincidence. A new study, conducted on mice, hints at an unexpected contributor to the nation's epidemic of obesity - and, if later human studies bear it out, a possible way to have our cake and eat it too, with less risk of weight gain and the diseases that come with it. Just eat your cake - or better yet, an apple - earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The W. M. Keck Foundation on Monday will announce a gift of $150 million to boost scientific research at USC's medical school and at two affiliated hospitals, adding to the university's recent success in attracting supersized donations. The gift is the single largest in the 57-year history of the Keck Foundation, which has backed many scientific projects, including the famous Keck Observatory and telescopes in Hawaii. For USC, the money marks the third mega-gift since March, for a total of $460 million, as new President C. L. Max Nikias seeks to build the Los Angeles university's endowment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2011 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Baruch Blumberg, who received the 1976 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for discovering the hepatitis B virus, which causes severe liver disease and cancer, and who later developed the vaccine that protects against it, has died. He was 85. Blumberg died Tuesday after apparently suffering a heart attack after delivering the keynote address at a NASA conference at the agency's Ames Research Center at Moffett Field in Mountain View, near San Jose. The isolation of the hepatitis B virus and development of a test for it were the first steps in the elimination of the virus from the U.S. blood supply, and the development of the vaccine led to a sharp decline in the incidence of both infections and liver cancer worldwide.
HEALTH
March 3, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A 50-year-old with Type 2 diabetes will lose an average of six years of life as a result of the disease, only one less than would be lost by a long-term smoker of the same age, researchers reported Wednesday. He or she is more than twice as likely to die of cardiovascular disease as someone without diabetes and 25% more likely to die of cancer, according to the report, an international study of more than 820,000 people published in the New England Journal of Medicine. People with Type 2 diabetes are also more likely to die from kidney disease, liver disease, pneumonia, infectious diseases and even intentional self-harm, according to the study, which was conducted by the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration, based at the University of Cambridge in England.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The widow of a 50-year-old Glendora man who died last year of complications from alcoholic liver disease has filed a lawsuit against his employer of 17 years, Miller Brewing Co. in Irwindale, which used to allow employees to drink on the premises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2011 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Baruch Blumberg, who received the 1976 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for discovering the hepatitis B virus, which causes severe liver disease and cancer, and who later developed the vaccine that protects against it, has died. He was 85. Blumberg died Tuesday after apparently suffering a heart attack after delivering the keynote address at a NASA conference at the agency's Ames Research Center at Moffett Field in Mountain View, near San Jose. The isolation of the hepatitis B virus and development of a test for it were the first steps in the elimination of the virus from the U.S. blood supply, and the development of the vaccine led to a sharp decline in the incidence of both infections and liver cancer worldwide.
NEWS
March 2, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A 50-year-old with Type 2 diabetes will lose an average of six years of life as a result of the disease, only one less than would be lost by a long-term smoker of the same age, researchers reported Wednesday. He or she is more than twice as likely to die of cardiovascular disease as someone without diabetes and 25% more likely to die of cancer, according to the report, an international study of more than 820,000 people published in the New England Journal of Medicine. People with Type 2 diabetes are also more likely to die from kidney disease, liver disease, pneumonia, infectious diseases and even intentional self-harm, according to the study, which was conducted by the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration, based at the University of Cambridge in England.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Grammy-winning singer Natalie Cole has been diagnosed with hepatitis C, her publicist said in a statement Wednesday. Hepatitis C is a liver disease spread through contact with infected blood. The statement said the disease was revealed during a routine examination and was likely caused by her drug use years ago. Her physician at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, Dr. Graham Woolf, said Cole, 58, has had a "terrific response to her medication and is now virus negative." He added that this "gives her an increased chance of cure."
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