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Livermore National Laboratory

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NEWS
December 8, 1988
A hacker gained access to scientific data from computer systems at Livermore National Laboratory, but no classified information was involved, officials at the research center said. "At this point, we aren't considering it a major attack," said Chuck Cole, computer security manager at the lab. "But let me qualify that by saying we don't know exactly what the guy was after and what he got."
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NATIONAL
November 10, 2010 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
The Energy Department said Tuesday it had fined Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, one of the nation's two nuclear weapons design centers, $200,000 for deficiencies in its program to protect workers from exposure to toxic beryllium dust. A consent order issued by the Energy Department's Office of Health, Safety and Security outlined a series of breakdowns at the lab, including failure to adequately control worker exposure, perform hazard assessments in buildings, measure the amount of beryllium in work areas and effectively train employees who work with the metal.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1993 | MICHELLE LOCKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For a scientist at a nuclear weapons research lab, Ken Turteltaub seems remarkably unmoved by the fact that his lab is teeming with mice. But these are no regular rodents. These are specially engineered creatures Turteltaub is using to hunt cancer-causing agents. One day, Turteltaub and his colleagues hope, the mice will track down something else: research revenues. After 40 years of honing the nation's military edge, scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are on a new mission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1993 | MICHELLE LOCKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For a scientist at a nuclear weapons research lab, Ken Turteltaub seems remarkably unmoved by the fact that his lab is teeming with mice. But these are no regular rodents. These are specially engineered creatures Turteltaub is using to hunt cancer-causing agents. One day, Turteltaub and his colleagues hope, the mice will track down something else: research revenues. After 40 years of honing the nation's military edge, scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are on a new mission.
NATIONAL
November 10, 2010 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
The Energy Department said Tuesday it had fined Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, one of the nation's two nuclear weapons design centers, $200,000 for deficiencies in its program to protect workers from exposure to toxic beryllium dust. A consent order issued by the Energy Department's Office of Health, Safety and Security outlined a series of breakdowns at the lab, including failure to adequately control worker exposure, perform hazard assessments in buildings, measure the amount of beryllium in work areas and effectively train employees who work with the metal.
NEWS
April 30, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concluding the most sensational medical investigation in local history, the Riverside County coroner's office announced Friday that Gloria Ramirez died of kidney failure as a result of cervical cancer--and the fumes that sickened the emergency room staff tending her probably were simply the smell of death.
NEWS
October 11, 2007
Biodefense research: An article Friday in Section A about the government's troubles in monitoring biodefense research said the University of California manages the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A consortium called Lawrence Livermore National Security, of which the University of California is one of five members, took over management of the lab from the university on Oct. 1.
NEWS
April 3, 1988
Authorities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory confirmed that more than 170 security badges for restricted areas are missing but claimed security at the lab was not threatened. The missing badges represent fewer than 1% of the 19,300 badges issued at the sprawling Alameda County facility since 1985, "an excellent record," lab official Sue Stephenson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1985 | Associated Press
During a Good Friday anti-nuclear protest that drew about 500 demonstrators, 40 people were arrested, most of them on misdemeanor counts of obstructing traffic on a road bordering the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. One man was arrested at the nuclear weapon lab's Site 300, about 20 miles east of the mile-square installation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
An independent analysis has found that key business practices at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are subject to adequate internal controls, the University of California announced Thursday. The announcement came just a day after the revelation that three midlevel security managers at the laboratory had been suspended because a lost key card went unreported for six weeks.
NEWS
December 8, 1988
A hacker gained access to scientific data from computer systems at Livermore National Laboratory, but no classified information was involved, officials at the research center said. "At this point, we aren't considering it a major attack," said Chuck Cole, computer security manager at the lab. "But let me qualify that by saying we don't know exactly what the guy was after and what he got."
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