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June 27, 1989 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Jimi Hazel got hooked on the guitar when he was 6 and his brother took him to see Jimi Hendrix at the 1970 New York Pop Festival. Years later, he teamed with some musicians who were into jazz and fusion, reggae and heavy metal, their accelerated hard rock drew an audience of slam dancing punk rockers, and they got an album deal. Happens every day in the U.S.A., right? The big difference in the case of the Bronx-based 24-7 Spyz is that Hazel, singer Peter Fluid, bassist Rick Skatore and drummer Anthony Johnson are black, still an anomaly in the racially categorized music business where black groups are expected to play rap or R&B. The group Living Colour has loosened the shackles, reaching a mainstream audience with its music and spearheading the Black Rock Coalition, an organization out to combat musical apartheid.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' Pop Music Critic.
Rock Losing Its Grip as Other Genres Gain. That recent headline on a Billboard magazine article documenting rock's dwindling share of the pop album market was sobering, but it wasn't unexpected. It has been clear for some time now that rock is no longer the creative heart of pop music. Rather than reflect the imagination and daring that it did in past decades, most rock deals shamelessly in hollow or recycled gestures--and all too often represents nothing more than casual entertainment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' Pop Music Critic.
Rock Losing Its Grip as Other Genres Gain. That recent headline on a Billboard magazine article documenting rock's dwindling share of the pop album market was sobering, but it wasn't unexpected. It has been clear for some time now that rock is no longer the creative heart of pop music. Rather than reflect the imagination and daring that it did in past decades, most rock deals shamelessly in hollow or recycled gestures--and all too often represents nothing more than casual entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
The four members of Living Colour responded to the first question in unison and so emphatically it sounded rehearsed. The question was, "Should anyone still care that you're a black hard-rock band?" The answer: "No!" For all intents, the response was rehearsed. The issue of race has been with Living Colour since it began in the mid-'80s, and the band would like nothing more than to lose it. After all, Living Colour established itself on grounds that have nothing to do with race.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1989 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Axl made the gig. Clapton joined the Stones. "Angie" entered the repertoire. Living Colour jumped into the Great Guns N' Roses bigotry debate. Those were the main twists on Thursday, the second night of the Rolling Stones-Guns N' Roses-Living Colour four-show stand at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1989 | J.D. CONSIDINE, The Baltimore Sun
One thing the members of Living Colour like is having the last laugh, and they have been having it a lot lately. Right now, everybody in radio loves the band. And why not? After all, not only is "Vivid," Living Colour's debut, entering its second year on the Billboard album chart, but the band is also in the midst of a national tour with the Rolling Stones.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
The four members of Living Colour responded to the first question in unison and so emphatically it sounded rehearsed. The question was, "Should anyone still care that you're a black hard-rock band?" The answer: "No!" For all intents, the response was rehearsed. The issue of race has been with Living Colour since it began in the mid-'80s, and the band would like nothing more than to lose it. After all, Living Colour established itself on grounds that have nothing to do with race.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1989 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Axl made the gig. Clapton joined the Stones. "Angie" entered the repertoire. Living Colour jumped into the Great Guns N' Roses bigotry debate. Those were the main twists on Thursday, the second night of the Rolling Stones-Guns N' Roses-Living Colour four-show stand at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1989 | J.D. CONSIDINE, The Baltimore Sun
One thing the members of Living Colour like is having the last laugh, and they have been having it a lot lately. Right now, everybody in radio loves the band. And why not? After all, not only is "Vivid," Living Colour's debut, entering its second year on the Billboard album chart, but the band is also in the midst of a national tour with the Rolling Stones.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1989 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Jimi Hazel got hooked on the guitar when he was 6 and his brother took him to see Jimi Hendrix at the 1970 New York Pop Festival. Years later, he teamed with some musicians who were into jazz and fusion, reggae and heavy metal, their accelerated hard rock drew an audience of slam dancing punk rockers, and they got an album deal. Happens every day in the U.S.A., right? The big difference in the case of the Bronx-based 24-7 Spyz is that Hazel, singer Peter Fluid, bassist Rick Skatore and drummer Anthony Johnson are black, still an anomaly in the racially categorized music business where black groups are expected to play rap or R&B. The group Living Colour has loosened the shackles, reaching a mainstream audience with its music and spearheading the Black Rock Coalition, an organization out to combat musical apartheid.
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