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Livingston Biddle

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Livingston L. Biddle Jr., 83, who helped write legislation creating the National Endowment for the Arts and was named by President Jimmy Carter to head the agency from 1977 to 1981, died Friday at Sibley Hospital in Washington, D.C. He had been in ill health for some time, but no cause of death was given. Born in Bryn Mawr, Pa., Biddle came from a long line of wealthy and influential ancestors. His great-great-grandfather, Nicholas Biddle, founded the Second Bank of the United States.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Livingston L. Biddle Jr., 83, who helped write legislation creating the National Endowment for the Arts and was named by President Jimmy Carter to head the agency from 1977 to 1981, died Friday at Sibley Hospital in Washington, D.C. He had been in ill health for some time, but no cause of death was given. Born in Bryn Mawr, Pa., Biddle came from a long line of wealthy and influential ancestors. His great-great-grandfather, Nicholas Biddle, founded the Second Bank of the United States.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts has called for a special session of the endowment's advisory council to try to resolve the new political crisis threatening the government arts agency. Livingston Biddle, who served as the endowment's third chairman from 1977-81 and remains close to influential arts policy leaders in Congress, made the proposal over the weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts has called for a special session of the endowment's advisory council to try to resolve the new political crisis threatening the government arts agency. Livingston Biddle, who served as the endowment's third chairman from 1977-81 and remains close to influential arts policy leaders in Congress, made the proposal over the weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
When Barbara Bush walked into a reception here last Tuesday night for public television's new series "Learning in America," the first question she was asked concerned the vacancy for the top post at the National Endowment for the Arts. Livingston Biddle, a past chairman of the endowment, wondered how the selection process was coming along. "We're all waiting with bated breath," Mrs. Bush replied easily.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, saying he needed time to "reflect" on the controversy created by his cancellation of a grant for an AIDS art show here, implied Wednesday that the federal arts agency may reconsider its position. But John E. Frohnmayer declined to say whether the process of reflection might lead to restoration of part or all of a $10,000 grant approved last July for the show, which includes work by 23 artists.
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
One day in April, 1965, two dozen of the nation's best known arts experts gathered in the White House for the first meeting of the cultural cornerstone of President Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society. There were superstars in abundance: conductor Leonard Bernstein and violinist Isaac Stern, choreographer Agnes de Mille, actor Gregory Peck and actress Elizabeth Ashley.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Allan Parachini is a Times staff writer. and
Just after 9 a.m. Friday, Washington time, in a drab meeting room notorious for acoustics that are marginal and air conditioning that is worse, National Endowment for the Arts Chairman John E. Frohnmayer will gavel to order the 109th meeting of what he likes to call "the greatest deliberative body on arts policy in the world."
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