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October 6, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni, in her first policy address since being nominated to form Israel's next government, voiced her commitment to press ahead with peace negotiations with the Palestinians. "Let us not allow dates or political changes to stand in our way," she said in an address at a policy conference at the Foreign Ministry also attended by Palestinian Authority Foreign Minister Riyad Maliki. "We are waiting to see who will be the next president, Obama versus McCain, and believe me there is a big difference between the two vis-a-vis . . . the Middle East peace process," Maliki said.
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WORLD
February 19, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced an agreement Tuesday night to bring his onetime political foe Tzipi Livni, head of the centrist Movement Party, into his pending coalition government. Livni, a former foreign minister who ran against Netanyahu in 2009 and served as opposition leader for much of the last four years, will become justice minister under the plan, both leaders announced during a joint appearance. Her party will also lead the Environmental Protection Ministry.
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WORLD
February 16, 2009 | Richard Boudreaux
The three big players in Israel's leadership struggle first crossed paths in 1996 when a rising politician named Avigdor Lieberman helped a former intelligence agent land her first high-level government job. Lieberman, who was Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's right-hand man at the time, resigned the following year and became his bitter rival. But Lieberman and the ex-spy, Tzipi Livni, then both 39, remained friends.
WORLD
January 25, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders and Batsheva Sobelman
Many people expected Tzipi Livni to become Israel's first female prime minister since Golda Meir. After her high-profile stint as foreign minister, the centrist Kadima party she heads won more votes than any other in elections last year. International leaders praised her as a new-style Israeli politician who could finally make peace with the Palestinians. Yet things aren't working out that way for Livni. Rather than making history, the 51-year-old is fighting for her political life.
WORLD
February 13, 2009 | Richard Boudreaux
Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni's long-shot effort to form a majority bloc in parliament and become Israel's next prime minister appeared to be fading Thursday, despite final returns upholding her centrist party's narrow first-place finish in national elections. After a second day of postelection lobbying, Livni had failed to win the support of any other party to thwart a rival leadership bid by conservative opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu.
WORLD
February 8, 2009 | Ashraf Khalil
First there was the "healing through laughter" seminar. Then "Orit the Carpenter," sort of a lesbian Martha Stewart, took the microphone and yelled, "We have seen our share of candidates over the years . . . all oozing testosterone and ego. But I have news for them: We, the woman, can do this!" Later, transsexual pop star Dana International performed a bouncy disco song and announced, "I now formally invite you to the diva sisterhood."
WORLD
May 2, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Tzipi Livni was named foreign minister and vice premier in the incoming Israeli government, the second-most powerful player on the nation's political scene. Livni, a 47-year-old member of the ruling Kadima party, is the daughter of a Zionist underground fighter and now champions Israel's withdrawal from much of the West Bank.
WORLD
February 19, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced an agreement Tuesday night to bring his onetime political foe Tzipi Livni, head of the centrist Movement Party, into his pending coalition government. Livni, a former foreign minister who ran against Netanyahu in 2009 and served as opposition leader for much of the last four years, will become justice minister under the plan, both leaders announced during a joint appearance. Her party will also lead the Environmental Protection Ministry.
WORLD
February 4, 2009 | Richard Boudreaux
Less than a week before Israeli voters pick a new leader, the candidate most involved in negotiations with the Palestinians is on the defensive over newly reported details of an interim peace accord offered months ago by outgoing Prime Minister Ehud Olmert.
WORLD
October 27, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
The leader of Israel's ruling party, Tzipi Livni, gave up her attempts to form a coalition government, setting the stage for early elections. That puts opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu, a critic of the Palestinian peace process, in a strong position to become the country's next prime minister. Livni has been trying to put together a government since she replaced Prime Minister Ehud Olmert as head of the ruling Kadima party last month.
WORLD
March 17, 2009 | Richard Boudreaux
Avigdor Lieberman, whose ultranationalist rhetoric has raised alarm among Arabs and international concern, took a major step Monday toward becoming foreign minister in Israel's next government. His appointment, part of a pact between his right-wing party and that of Prime Minister-designate Benjamin Netanyahu, is not final. The deal leaves an opening for the current foreign minister, Tzipi Livni, to stay in that post if her centrist Kadima party agrees to join the coalition.
WORLD
February 23, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Israel's political rivals Benjamin Netanyahu and Tzipi Livni met for the first time since an indecisive Feb. 10 election to talk about a future government. Netanyahu, hawkish leader of the right-wing Likud party, is trying to persuade Livni, the foreign minister, to be part of a joint government. Meanwhile, Amnesty International called today for a global arms embargo against Israel, accusing it of using white phosphorous and other weapons supplied by the United States to commit war crimes in the Gaza Strip.
WORLD
February 21, 2009 | Ashraf Khalil
Benjamin Netanyahu, leader of the right-wing Likud party, Friday accepted the task of forming Israel's new government and becoming the country's next prime minister. He appealed to his top rival, Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni, to join him in a coalition government. President Shimon Peres officially assigned Netanyahu the role of building a government despite the fact that Livni's Kadima party captured more of the popular vote in parliamentary elections this month.
WORLD
February 16, 2009 | Richard Boudreaux
The three big players in Israel's leadership struggle first crossed paths in 1996 when a rising politician named Avigdor Lieberman helped a former intelligence agent land her first high-level government job. Lieberman, who was Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's right-hand man at the time, resigned the following year and became his bitter rival. But Lieberman and the ex-spy, Tzipi Livni, then both 39, remained friends.
WORLD
February 13, 2009 | Richard Boudreaux
Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni's long-shot effort to form a majority bloc in parliament and become Israel's next prime minister appeared to be fading Thursday, despite final returns upholding her centrist party's narrow first-place finish in national elections. After a second day of postelection lobbying, Livni had failed to win the support of any other party to thwart a rival leadership bid by conservative opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu.
WORLD
February 11, 2009 | Richard Boudreaux
Israel's voters threw the country into political uncertainty Tuesday, apparently giving Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni's centrist party the largest share of seats in parliament but shifting the majority to a collection of right-wing parties hostile to her goal of a peace accord with the Palestinians. Near-complete returns left it unclear whether Livni or her closest rival, conservative Benjamin Netanyahu, would become Israel's next prime minister.
WORLD
February 23, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Israel's political rivals Benjamin Netanyahu and Tzipi Livni met for the first time since an indecisive Feb. 10 election to talk about a future government. Netanyahu, hawkish leader of the right-wing Likud party, is trying to persuade Livni, the foreign minister, to be part of a joint government. Meanwhile, Amnesty International called today for a global arms embargo against Israel, accusing it of using white phosphorous and other weapons supplied by the United States to commit war crimes in the Gaza Strip.
WORLD
February 8, 2009 | Ashraf Khalil
First there was the "healing through laughter" seminar. Then "Orit the Carpenter," sort of a lesbian Martha Stewart, took the microphone and yelled, "We have seen our share of candidates over the years . . . all oozing testosterone and ego. But I have news for them: We, the woman, can do this!" Later, transsexual pop star Dana International performed a bouncy disco song and announced, "I now formally invite you to the diva sisterhood."
WORLD
February 4, 2009 | Richard Boudreaux
Less than a week before Israeli voters pick a new leader, the candidate most involved in negotiations with the Palestinians is on the defensive over newly reported details of an interim peace accord offered months ago by outgoing Prime Minister Ehud Olmert.
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