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Liz Carpenter

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2010 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Liz Carpenter, an author and former press secretary to First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, died Saturday at an Austin, Texas, hospital after contracting pneumonia earlier in the week, said her daughter, Christy Carpenter. She was 89. On Nov. 22, 1963, Carpenter scribbled the 58 words that Lyndon Johnson delivered to the nation when he returned to Washington from Dallas after the assassination of President Kennedy: "This is a sad time for all people. We have suffered a loss that cannot be weighed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2010 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Liz Carpenter, an author and former press secretary to First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, died Saturday at an Austin, Texas, hospital after contracting pneumonia earlier in the week, said her daughter, Christy Carpenter. She was 89. On Nov. 22, 1963, Carpenter scribbled the 58 words that Lyndon Johnson delivered to the nation when he returned to Washington from Dallas after the assassination of President Kennedy: "This is a sad time for all people. We have suffered a loss that cannot be weighed.
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BOOKS
July 12, 1987 | Annie Gilbar
The words to describe Liz Carpenter's tale of her days as a political activist, White House insider, friend, wife, mother and writer may be trite--homespun, delightful, warm, touching, friendly and insightful--yet the book is anything but. This is not just another gossipy account of the life of a Washington veteran. Carpenter has always been a woman motivated and involved--whether it was as a journalist, an aide to Lyndon B.
OPINION
December 25, 1994 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a producer for Fox News and a contributor to National Public Radio's "All Things Considered" and "Morning Edition." He spoke with Liz Carpenter from her home in Houston, Texas.
If charity truly begins at home, then set a place at the head of the table for Liz Carpenter. At age 70, when most folks are content to rock and contemplate years past, she took on the stand-up task of raising three teen-age kids. Her brother had produced the brood, the result of a late and failed second marriage. Upon his death, no one, it seemed, was willing to take in the kids. No one except Liz Carpenter. When Carpenter was 6, she was bitten by a mad dog. She survived, intact.
OPINION
December 25, 1994 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a producer for Fox News and a contributor to National Public Radio's "All Things Considered" and "Morning Edition." He spoke with Liz Carpenter from her home in Houston, Texas.
If charity truly begins at home, then set a place at the head of the table for Liz Carpenter. At age 70, when most folks are content to rock and contemplate years past, she took on the stand-up task of raising three teen-age kids. Her brother had produced the brood, the result of a late and failed second marriage. Upon his death, no one, it seemed, was willing to take in the kids. No one except Liz Carpenter. When Carpenter was 6, she was bitten by a mad dog. She survived, intact.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | BARBARA SLAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was the sort of plug a publisher could die for. There into the midst of Liz Carpenter's lunchtime talk about her new book, "Unplanned Parenthood: The Confessions of a Seventysomething Surrogate Mother" (Random House), strolled Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
August 17, 1987 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
When Liz Carpenter went home to Texas in 1976 after nearly 3 1/2 decades in Washington, her friends filled Ford's Theater for a farewell. She had come out of small-town Texas armed with little more than a journalism degree and a super-energy personality, and she was leaving after a high-profile stint as press secretary to Lady Bird Johnson and as a public relations executive. "When I first said I was going to leave," she recalled, "everybody acted as though the Washington Monument would crumble.
NEWS
November 12, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Lady Bird Johnson, wife of President Lyndon B. Johnson for nearly 39 years, was admitted to an Austin, Texas, hospital in fair condition after fainting at her home. Liz Carpenter, her former White House spokeswoman, said Mrs. Johnson, 86, "has periodic fainting spells" and was transported to Seton Medical Center. Mrs. Johnson was awake and alert and will stay overnight for observation, a hospital spokeswoman said. Mrs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1994
The American Assn. of Retired Persons will feature speakers on the economy, consumer rights, health and fitness, and love, sexuality and aging at its national convention May 3 to 5 at the Anaheim Convention Center. Among the scheduled speakers are political commentator William F. Buckley Jr., economist Louis Rukeyser, consumer advocate David Horowitz, television medical reporter Dr. Art Ulene, former Surgeon General C.
NEWS
January 29, 1996 | From Associated Press
Ralph W. Yarborough, the only Southern senator who voted for the 1964 Civil Rights Act, died Saturday. He was 92. He died at his Austin home, said an assistant in Yarborough's law office. Despite his age, Yarborough had continued to practice civil law, focusing primarily on the oil and gas business, she said.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | BARBARA SLAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was the sort of plug a publisher could die for. There into the midst of Liz Carpenter's lunchtime talk about her new book, "Unplanned Parenthood: The Confessions of a Seventysomething Surrogate Mother" (Random House), strolled Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
August 17, 1987 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
When Liz Carpenter went home to Texas in 1976 after nearly 3 1/2 decades in Washington, her friends filled Ford's Theater for a farewell. She had come out of small-town Texas armed with little more than a journalism degree and a super-energy personality, and she was leaving after a high-profile stint as press secretary to Lady Bird Johnson and as a public relations executive. "When I first said I was going to leave," she recalled, "everybody acted as though the Washington Monument would crumble.
BOOKS
July 12, 1987 | Annie Gilbar
The words to describe Liz Carpenter's tale of her days as a political activist, White House insider, friend, wife, mother and writer may be trite--homespun, delightful, warm, touching, friendly and insightful--yet the book is anything but. This is not just another gossipy account of the life of a Washington veteran. Carpenter has always been a woman motivated and involved--whether it was as a journalist, an aide to Lyndon B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1989 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
"Anything can happen," Joe Goode says softly, looming over a tiny ceramic hillside that's displayed on a table top at the Sushi Performance Gallery--and then flooding the landscape with the contents of a giant watering can. "Ennn-eee-thing can happen." San Francisco-based choreographer Goode likes to blur the boundaries between modern dance and theater, and in "The Disaster Series" he also erases any distinction between personal and natural calamity, with uproarious results. "The yard's blowing into the next state," Goode cries as a dust storm descends on another of sculptor James Morris' brightly painted miniatures.
NEWS
August 17, 1987 | LIZ CARPENTER
Why do the traumas of life--the wrenching moments--surface so often, years after they have passed? I still get chills thinking of that day in Dallas--Nov. 22, 1963. I was part of that motorcade. I agonized through the hours as we waited at Parkland Hospital. After President Kennedy's death was announced, we raced across Dallas in a police car, only vaguely aware that while we had come with the vice president, we were returning to Washington with the President. L.B.J.
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