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Liz Larner

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January 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
If a sculptor is going to make paintings, then ceramics seem to be the way to go. That, at least, is the loopy lesson from Liz Larner's eccentrically engaging exhibition of recent work at Regen Projects. The show also includes more traditional freestanding sculptures, including a large, highly polished “X” of cast stainless steel that seems poised to leap into the air like a giant, agitated water bug. Nearby, a billowy black form looks like the tail of a leaping whale paired with its mirror reflection in water.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
If a sculptor is going to make paintings, then ceramics seem to be the way to go. That, at least, is the loopy lesson from Liz Larner's eccentrically engaging exhibition of recent work at Regen Projects. The show also includes more traditional freestanding sculptures, including a large, highly polished “X” of cast stainless steel that seems poised to leap into the air like a giant, agitated water bug. Nearby, a billowy black form looks like the tail of a leaping whale paired with its mirror reflection in water.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1998 | Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Anyone who visited the permanent collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art at the Geffen Contemporary last winter or spring saw a 1991 sculpture titled "Corridors" by Liz Larner, consisting of bright red pennants made of fabric and steel. "Whatever happened to her?" might well be a question that would come to mind. Larner made a splash as part of MOCA's renowned "Helter Skelter" exhibition of L.A.
MAGAZINE
March 17, 2002 | LESLEE KOMAIKO
My boyfriend took me to Kauai over New Year's. We stayed on the south shore, in Poipu, in some condos. It was so nice not to have a plan. Kauai is incredible. There are these great mountains. We'd drive to one end of the island and hang out there. The next day we'd drive to the other end of the island. The north shore is really tropical, with tons of plants, really green. The west shore is all dunes, really dry. We had only one rule: We had to get in the ocean every day.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In a 1988 work on paper, sculptor Liz Larner incorporated a portion of scientific text that makes reference to Leonardo da Vinci. Pondering the mysterious forces that generate life, the great Renaissance artist and scientist once proposed the analogy of a flame burning on a candle. The flame, he suggested, "is continuously maintained in its 'resting state' by a flux of material being dissolved from the mass of the candle and being burned at the wick."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Los Angeles artist Liz Larner says that "sculpture is about expanding where a surface begins or stops or changes." An exhibition of her work on view at the Stuart Regen Gallery in West Hollywood suggests that she's interested in closing the gap existing between viewer and art object because she positions her work in that very space. With roots in conceptual and minimal art, her work is about penetrating surfaces, getting into and under them, and she can be wickedly clever in pursuit of that aim.
MAGAZINE
March 17, 2002 | LESLEE KOMAIKO
My boyfriend took me to Kauai over New Year's. We stayed on the south shore, in Poipu, in some condos. It was so nice not to have a plan. Kauai is incredible. There are these great mountains. We'd drive to one end of the island and hang out there. The next day we'd drive to the other end of the island. The north shore is really tropical, with tons of plants, really green. The west shore is all dunes, really dry. We had only one rule: We had to get in the ocean every day.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2001 | DAVID PAGEL
A short list of the materials Liz Larner has used to make her sculptures during the past 15 years is a pretty kinky inventory. It runs from false eyelashes to stainless steel chains, and includes surgical gauze, saltpeter, guitar strings, buttermilk, collagen, gold, copper carbonate, cast polyurethane, leather, mulberry paper, volcanic ash and an entire uprooted Agave americana, as well as such traditional standbys as wood, wax, plaster and bronze.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1998
"Kenny Scharf"--"Allzention," left, is among new works on canvas and paper being exhibited at Kantor Gallery, 8642 Melrose Ave., through Sept. 10 by the Pop artist. * "Liz Larner"--Recent sculpture by the artist will go on display Saturday at Regen Projects, 629 N. Almont Drive. They will remain through Aug. 1. * "Playing With Matches"--Works by rock musician Beck and his grandfather Al Hansen remain on exhibit through July 5 at Santa Monica Museum of Art, 2525 Michigan Ave. in Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2008 | Christopher Knight
The Museum of Contemporary Art's permanent collection gallery space is so small that its exceptional holdings must be rotated in "Highlights" shows. Today is the final day to see selections from 1980 to 2005, including fine individual works by Barbara Kruger, left, Rineke Dijkstra, Mike Kelley, Liz Larner, Dave Muller and Kara Walker. Today, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 250 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. $10, $5 students and seniors, free to children under 12. (213) 626-6222, www.moca.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2001 | DAVID PAGEL
A short list of the materials Liz Larner has used to make her sculptures during the past 15 years is a pretty kinky inventory. It runs from false eyelashes to stainless steel chains, and includes surgical gauze, saltpeter, guitar strings, buttermilk, collagen, gold, copper carbonate, cast polyurethane, leather, mulberry paper, volcanic ash and an entire uprooted Agave americana, as well as such traditional standbys as wood, wax, plaster and bronze.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In a 1988 work on paper, sculptor Liz Larner incorporated a portion of scientific text that makes reference to Leonardo da Vinci. Pondering the mysterious forces that generate life, the great Renaissance artist and scientist once proposed the analogy of a flame burning on a candle. The flame, he suggested, "is continuously maintained in its 'resting state' by a flux of material being dissolved from the mass of the candle and being burned at the wick."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1998 | Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Anyone who visited the permanent collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art at the Geffen Contemporary last winter or spring saw a 1991 sculpture titled "Corridors" by Liz Larner, consisting of bright red pennants made of fabric and steel. "Whatever happened to her?" might well be a question that would come to mind. Larner made a splash as part of MOCA's renowned "Helter Skelter" exhibition of L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Los Angeles artist Liz Larner says that "sculpture is about expanding where a surface begins or stops or changes." An exhibition of her work on view at the Stuart Regen Gallery in West Hollywood suggests that she's interested in closing the gap existing between viewer and art object because she positions her work in that very space. With roots in conceptual and minimal art, her work is about penetrating surfaces, getting into and under them, and she can be wickedly clever in pursuit of that aim.
NEWS
November 29, 2001
all day Art In a body of work that defies conventional notions of how to make sculpture, Los Angeles artist Liz Larner fills rooms with wiry structures, constructs floor mats of leather and false eyelashes and assembles chunky masses of tiny aluminum and steel modules. Her mid-career survey, "Liz Larner," will explore 15 years of her creative output at the Museum of Contemporary Art. "Liz Larner," Museum of Contemporary Art, 250 S. Grand Ave., L.A. Sunday to March 10.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic
The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles has announced its 2002 art acquisitions -- a bonanza of more than 90 gifts and purchases. "A Quadrilateral Oriented Vision, Per I-Per VI," a monumental abstract painting by Alfred Jensen, donated by the estate of artist Sam Francis, is among the most highly prized items.
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