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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1989 | KEVIN BRASS
In the San Diego Tribune newsroom, staffers are questioning their editors' definition of plagiarism when it involves press releases, after a recent incident involving a real-estate reporter. A few weeks ago, a story on Los Angeles redevelopment with Trib real estate reporter Herb Lawrence's byline was killed by editors when it was discovered to be extremely similar to an article that ran in a small Los Angeles business magazine.
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SPORTS
March 5, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canadian Peter Fonseca, running in his first marathon, found himself in a pack of three runners leading the race with only one mile to go in Sunday's Los Angeles Marathon. Alongside Fonseca, 23, were two men who were a decade older and had run scores of world-class marathons. Suddenly, the men began to run with almost wild abandon, sprinting hard after running 25 miles. It was a pivotal moment for Fonseca, and a telling moment, too. For in marathons, as in life, experience is the best teacher.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | JANICE ROSS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A holiday show about the dignity of aging, the lack of commitment in today's society and the shallowness of material gifts, is not exactly the stuff of traditional light Christmas fare, but then ODC/San Francisco is far from a traditional dance company.
HOME & GARDEN
August 10, 2006 | Lisa Boone, Times Staff Writer
YOU notice the chandelier first, hanging on the porch of a weathered 1910 Craftsman, in sharp contrast to the chop saw lying nearby. Meredith Clark pulls leaded Austrian crystals from Tupperware containers and attaches strands of the delicate beads to a 5-foot-tall steel frame suspended from her roof. It's not the setting where one might expect to find a designer of fine, custom chandeliers: A friend's son is napping nearby on the sleeping porch; Clark's own son asks if he can check his e-mail.
NEWS
April 2, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jane Smiley, whose Iowa-set novel "A Thousand Acres" won a Pulitzer Prize for fiction, will launch the spring edition of Manuscripts, the Newport Beach Public Library Foundation's literary lecture series. Smiley will discuss her most recent novel, "Moo," which was nominated last year for the National Book Critics Circle Award. She is, says the New York Times Book Review, "fast becoming the Balzac of the late 20th-Century American Midwest."
NEWS
October 25, 1985 | Jody Jacobs
Four of the bridesmaids at Princess Grace's marriage to Prince Rainier back on April 19, 1956, will be holding a reunion when they attend the Princess Grace Foundation Gala on Nov. 4 at the Beverly Wilshire.
SPORTS
April 22, 1986 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Just before Australian Rob de Castella runs a marathon, he carefully writes his predicted splits in indelible ink on the top of his left hand. When he entered the Boston Marathon Monday, his left hand reflected two paces: 2 hours 8 minutes, and 2 hours 10 minutes--the fastest and slowest times he had hoped to run. Even the fastest turned out to be too slow.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1990 | DAVID GERE, Gere is a San Francisco-based free-lance writer. and
It is the final night of the Margaret Jenkins Dance Company's three-city tour to the Soviet Union, and dancer Anne Krauss is evoking the still grandeur of America's Southwest in the concluding section of "Rollback." As Terry Allen's throbbing country score fades to silence, Krauss walks in a leisurely circle around the perimeter of the stage, conjuring images of light and of water with her gently rolling hands.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | Special to The Times
With reports of misconduct on the rise at many California colleges and universities, campus judicial systems are quietly handling thousands of cases each year ranging from plagiarism and petty larceny to physical assault and rape. Drunken Pomona College students went joy riding in the dean's golf cart. Chico State dorm residents were nabbed in a drug sting. A pair of UC Santa Cruz students, dubbed Bonnie and Clyde, were arrested for two armed robberies.
NEWS
May 9, 1985 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Theirs was a courtship of stolen kisses, secret messages, clandestine dates in faraway suburbs and, finally, elopement to a community where they were not known. "Had we been caught, I would have gone to jail for sure--that is, if I wasn't beaten to death first," Charles Lottering said recently. "What we were doing was, in the eyes of the law, one of the worst possible crimes, something like treason."
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