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Lizzie Luna

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1985 | MICHELE L. NORRIS, Times Staff Writer
Lizzie Luna might not make it into a football hall of fame, but the 14-year-old Westchester High School freshman will go on record as the first girl ever to try out for a Los Angeles Unified School District football team. District officials agreed Monday to allow Lizzie to try out for the school's B football squad, revoking an unofficial school board policy barring girls from competing with boys in football, wrestling and water polo--contact sports thought to be too dangerous.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1985 | MICHELE L. NORRIS, Times Staff Writer
Like any good fullback, Lizzie Luna has been breaking new ground and hurtling past the opposition. Last month, the 14-year-old Westchester High School freshman persuaded the Los Angeles Unified School District to revoke a policy that prevented girls from playing contact sports like football. This month she tried out for the Westchester team and, overcoming the skepticism of Coach Bill Gino, won a second-string fullback spot on the B squad.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1985 | MICHELE L. NORRIS, Times Staff Writer
Like any good fullback, Lizzie Luna has been breaking new ground and hurtling past the opposition. Last month, the 14-year-old Westchester High School freshman persuaded the Los Angeles Unified School District to revoke a policy that prevented girls from playing contact sports like football. This month she tried out for the Westchester team and, overcoming the skepticism of Coach Bill Gino, won a second-string fullback spot on the B squad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1985 | MICHELE L. NORRIS, Times Staff Writer
Lizzie Luna might not make it into a football hall of fame, but the 14-year-old Westchester High School freshman will go on record as the first girl ever to try out for a Los Angeles Unified School District football team. District officials agreed Monday to allow Lizzie to try out for the school's B football squad, revoking an unofficial school board policy barring girls from competing with boys in football, wrestling and water polo--contact sports thought to be too dangerous.
NEWS
October 12, 1986 | MICHELE L. NORRIS
As the first girl ever to play on a Los Angeles Unified School District football team, Lizzie Luna drew the kind of media attention normally reserved for superstar athletes. This year, however, the bright lights have faded and Lizzie is "just concentrating on getting on the playing field," she said. "All the media hype was nice and all but it was really distracting, ya know?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1985 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
High-school girls will be allowed to wrestle and play football with boys under a proposed policy change being drafted by the San Diego Unified School District, Supt. Thomas W. Payzant said Tuesday. The change, which does not require the approval of the Board of Education, was prompted by a request from Mira Mesa High School sophomore Kerry Hanley to try out for the boys' wrestling team, according to school officials and Mira Mesa wrestling coach Jon Talbott.
NEWS
October 31, 1985 | Alan Drooz and Michele L. Norris
Mira Costa High senior Chris Fischetti is still most of the school year away from graduation, but unlike most of his companions he has a pretty good idea what he'll be doing for a living. The 17-year-old won the expert division of the World Jet Ski Championships last weekend at Lake Havasu. He'll probably become a professional jet skier next spring. Fischetti has made a rapid rise in the sport--considered a boating competition--since taking it up three years ago.
NEWS
October 18, 1985 | GARY LIBMAN
When Dinuba High School arrived at McLane Stadium for its game with Fresno Hoover, it found banners proclaiming "57 Is Great and She's a Girl" and "We Love You, Bridget." Strange messages for a football stadium, but their meaning became clear late in the third quarter when Hoover scored the game's first touchdown and 5-foot-1 1/2, 100-pound Bridget Farris ran onto the field to kick the point-after-touchdown. Hoover fans chanted "Brid-get! Brid-get!"
SPORTS
January 8, 1986 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, Times Staff Writer
Alton Doyle, executive director of the New York State Public High School Athletic Assn., can't understand why high school girls would want to play football. He thinks they do it for the publicity. He says he's afraid that a girl might suffer internal damage that could hamper reproductive functions years later. He says he worries that if more girls play on boys' teams, existing girls' programs will suffer.
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