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Ljungan Virus

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April 28, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
One of the most widely used animal models for Type 1 diabetes has been found to carry a virus that was previously shown to produce diabetes in other rodents, a finding that offers the possibility of new treatments for the widespread disorder. The BioBreeding, or BB, rat naturally develops diabetes at about 2 months of age, and researchers have attributed the disease to genetics.
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SCIENCE
April 28, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
One of the most widely used animal models for Type 1 diabetes has been found to carry a virus that was previously shown to produce diabetes in other rodents, a finding that offers the possibility of new treatments for the widespread disorder. The BioBreeding, or BB, rat naturally develops diabetes at about 2 months of age, and researchers have attributed the disease to genetics.
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SCIENCE
April 21, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Infections by a recently discovered virus may be responsible for a significant fraction of stillbirths, Swedish and American researchers reported Thursday in the journal Birth Defects Research. The Ljungan virus is named after the Swedish river valley where virologist Bo Niklasson of Uppsala University discovered it in voles in 1999. The virus is apparently also common in American rodents, said his coauthor, geneticist William Klitz of the Public Health Institute in Oakland.
SCIENCE
April 21, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Infections by a recently discovered virus may be responsible for a significant fraction of stillbirths, Swedish and American researchers reported Thursday in the journal Birth Defects Research. The Ljungan virus is named after the Swedish river valley where virologist Bo Niklasson of Uppsala University discovered it in voles in 1999. The virus is apparently also common in American rodents, said his coauthor, geneticist William Klitz of the Public Health Institute in Oakland.
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