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Lloy Ball

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SPORTS
March 17, 1995 | Mike Downey
For the life of me, I cannot picture him playing basketball for Bobby Knight in the NCAA tournament. Not with that goatee of his. Not with that tattoo on his leg of a skeleton spiking a volleyball. Not with that other tattoo wrapped around his arm--the snake. Oh, yeah. Sure thing. I bet Knight wishes all of his players could look like this. It doesn't matter. The game became volleyball, not basketball, for Lloy Ball. He stands 6 feet 9.
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NEWS
July 21, 1996 | ROBYN NORWOOD
The oddball on a volleyball team of California beach boys is Lloy Ball, an Indiana-bred setter with a goatee, tattoos and silver toenail polish who once turned down a basketball scholarship offer from Hoosier Coach Bob Knight. "He told me I should have no preconceived notions about what I'd do, that he'd decided what I'd do," said Ball, 24. "That didn't seem that ideal to me. All my friends told me I had to go to Indiana. In my heart, I felt volleyball was what I wanted to do.
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NEWS
July 21, 1996 | ROBYN NORWOOD
The oddball on a volleyball team of California beach boys is Lloy Ball, an Indiana-bred setter with a goatee, tattoos and silver toenail polish who once turned down a basketball scholarship offer from Hoosier Coach Bob Knight. "He told me I should have no preconceived notions about what I'd do, that he'd decided what I'd do," said Ball, 24. "That didn't seem that ideal to me. All my friends told me I had to go to Indiana. In my heart, I felt volleyball was what I wanted to do.
SPORTS
March 17, 1995 | Mike Downey
For the life of me, I cannot picture him playing basketball for Bobby Knight in the NCAA tournament. Not with that goatee of his. Not with that tattoo on his leg of a skeleton spiking a volleyball. Not with that other tattoo wrapped around his arm--the snake. Oh, yeah. Sure thing. I bet Knight wishes all of his players could look like this. It doesn't matter. The game became volleyball, not basketball, for Lloy Ball. He stands 6 feet 9.
SPORTS
May 4, 1993
Cal State Long Beach's Brent Hilliard, a Dana Hills High graduate, was named Monday to the American Volleyball Coaches Assn. All-American second team. Hilliard, the AVCA player of the year last season, broke the NCAA record for career kills with 3,034. He's a three-time All-American. The teams: First team--Player of the year: Canyon Ceman (Stanford), Dave Goss (Stanford), Coley Kyman (Cal State Northridge), Jeff Nygaard (UCLA), Mike Sealy (UCLA), Tom Sorensen (Pepperdine).
SPORTS
May 7, 1994 | SCOTT HORNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Al Scates had the matchup he wanted and UCLA created a mismatch in a hurry. The top-ranked Bruins jumped on an undermanned and ailing Indiana-Purdue at Ft. Wayne squad Friday night and advanced to the NCAA men's volleyball championship game with a 15-3, 15-8, 15-4 victory at the Allen County War Memorial Coliseum. UCLA will play Penn State in the final tonight. UCLA defeated Ft. Wayne twice earlier this season, but needed four games to beat the Volleydons (20-7) here in January.
SPORTS
August 11, 2008 | K.C. Johnson, Chicago Tribune
BEIJING -- With the crowd screaming and emotions swirling, the U.S. men's Olympic volleyball team formed a circle on the Capital Gymnasium floor and did something unprecedented. They didn't speak. The solemn moment of silence contrasted sharply with the hugs and smiles that came late Sunday afternoon when Clay Stanley's blocked spike fell out of bounds, finally securing the U.S. team's five-set, opening-match victory over Venezuela.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1996
Olympic athletes in Atlanta are decorated not just in bronze, silver and gold medals, but an assortment of piercings, tattoos and accessories reflecting the personal body style that has become popular among the Olympians' age group in general. Several Olympics ago, track star Carl Lewis' box haircut inspired a fad among African American men.
SPORTS
September 24, 2000 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A knee injury sustained in the high jump left Shelia Burrell, a former resident of Reseda, in 30th place in the heptathlon after the first day of competition Saturday at Sydney. Burrell, an assistant track coach at Cal State Northridge last year, was in third place with 1,080 points after running the 100-meter high hurdles in 13.30 to open the competition. But she injured her knee on her first--and only attempt--in the high jump when she caught a spike on the high jump apron.
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | MIKE KUPPER, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
The unexpected loss to Argentina in the opener of the Olympic men's volleyball tournament Sunday came back to haunt the U.S. team today when second-ranked Russia beat the Americans and dropped them into fifth place in their six-team pool. The Russians withstood a strong battle from a determined U.S team, 25-18, 25-23, 21-25, 25-17, dominating the fourth game as the U.S., feeling the desperation, fell into a series of net serves and unforced errors. "We made a lot of mistakes and that hurt us."
SPORTS
August 30, 2004 | Bill Dwyre, Times Staff Writer
As it turns out, the big finish by the U.S. men's volleyball team Wednesday night against Greece was exactly that -- the finish. The U.S. men lost their next two matches in straight sets, including Sunday's Olympic bronze-medal game against Russia. "We got to such a crescendo in that game against Greece that we may have left it all out there that night," American captain Lloy Ball said. "We never seemed to have recovered."
SPORTS
August 21, 2008 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
BEIJING -- U.S. men's volleyball Coach Hugh McCutcheon won't talk about the family tragedy that has forever marked his Olympic experience with sadness. It would be too hard for McCutcheon to speak over and over about the violent death of his father-in-law and injuries to his mother-in-law on Aug. 9, the day after the opening ceremony. So when the U.S. advanced to the semifinals with a five-set, come-from-behind win over Serbia on Wednesday night and McCutcheon was asked about his emotions, he had a simple answer.
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