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Lloyd Bentsen

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OPINION
December 20, 1992
Regarding Clinton's choice for secretary of the treasury: Lloyd Bentsen, you're no Alexander Hamilton. RICHARD LINDE, Camarillo
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Lloyd Bentsen, the former four-term U.S. senator from Texas who was the 1988 Democratic vice presidential nominee and served as President Clinton's first secretary of the Treasury, died Tuesday. He was 85. Bentsen, who had been in poor health since suffering two strokes in 1998, died at his home in Houston, a family spokesman said. In a statement Tuesday, President Bush called Bentsen "a man of great honor and distinction."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Lloyd Bentsen, the former four-term U.S. senator from Texas who was the 1988 Democratic vice presidential nominee and served as President Clinton's first secretary of the Treasury, died Tuesday. He was 85. Bentsen, who had been in poor health since suffering two strokes in 1998, died at his home in Houston, a family spokesman said. In a statement Tuesday, President Bush called Bentsen "a man of great honor and distinction."
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican members of the Senate Whitewater Committee charged Tuesday that former Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen had compromised an investigation last year into allegedly improper contacts between his department and the White House. Bentsen, while denying the charges, acknowledged that he sent confidential transcripts of testimony in the ethics probe to then-White House Counsel Lloyd N. Cutler at Cutler's request.
OPINION
July 15, 1990 | Ronald Brownstein, Ronald Brownstein is a national political correspondent for The Times. He interviewed the senator in his Capitol Hill office
Who says there are no second acts in American lives? Lloyd Bentsen may be about to embark on his fourth. As a young World War II veteran and son of a prosperous rancher, Bentsen was sent to Congress to represent the Rio Grande Valley in southern Texas in 1948, the year Harry S. Truman was elected President. Bentsen served three terms and looked to be headed for a long career in Washington, when he surprisingly pulled down the curtain on politics and opened act two of his life.
OPINION
December 13, 1992 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
"Fundamental change" is not the phrase that springs to mind on contemplation of Sen. Lloyd Bentsen's features. Like a gently eroded landscape, those folds and tucks and dewlaps speak to a spirit of sedate continuity, unsurprising in a conservative Texas businessman who has risen over the years to the chairmanship of the Senate Finance Committee.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | United Press International
Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.), with the state Capitol as a backdrop, announced Wednesday he will run for a fourth term in 1988.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1988
With reference to the new Democratic ticket of Michael Dukakis and Lloyd Bentsen: Why is it no pundit has apparently penned the obvious--"What is your D and B rating"? J.H. DUTHIE Dominguez Hills
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | Douglas Jehl \f7
The Democratic theme of the week may have been defense, but the word of the week for vice presidential candidate Lloyd Bentsen was "Southern." "I'm proud to be a Southern Democrat," Bentsen said again and again as he campaigned in Texas, Louisiana, Tennessee, North Carolina and Florida. And at every stop he repeated a tribute from Georgia Sen. Sam Nunn, who said: "Lloyd Bentsen speaks three languages. He speaks Spanish, he speaks English and he speaks Southern."
BUSINESS
November 15, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bentsen Urges Caution on Rates: Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen warned the Federal Reserve Board against overdoing its anti-inflation campaign. Speaking one day before the central bank was to meet to map monetary strategy, Bentsen said inflation remains low and the economy has yet to feel the full impact of the Fed's repeated rate increases this year. He said growth needs to slow moderately to prevent the economy from overheating, but "that's the problem: being sure you just slow it moderately."
NEWS
December 6, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen, the Clinton Administration's elder statesman and chief spokesman on economic policy, plans to resign after the first of the year, senior Administration sources said Monday. He is expected to be succeeded by Robert E. Rubin, chairman of the National Economic Council and a senior economic policy adviser in the White House.
NEWS
November 19, 1994 | From Associated Press
Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen, sending the strongest signal yet of White House plans to propose tax relief next year, said Friday a middle-class tax cut is desirable so long as it doesn't worsen the federal deficit. "We agree on the desirability of a tax cut for middle-income Americans, but something of that nature must be properly paid for," said Bentsen, the Clinton Administration's chief spokesman on economic matters.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bentsen Urges Caution on Rates: Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen warned the Federal Reserve Board against overdoing its anti-inflation campaign. Speaking one day before the central bank was to meet to map monetary strategy, Bentsen said inflation remains low and the economy has yet to feel the full impact of the Fed's repeated rate increases this year. He said growth needs to slow moderately to prevent the economy from overheating, but "that's the problem: being sure you just slow it moderately."
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | SARA FRITZ and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Under intense criticism from Democrats as well as Republicans over the Administration's handling of the Whitewater controversy, Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger Altman declared Wednesday that he does not intend to resign. At the same time, Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen acknowledged that his subordinates made "some errors in judgment" that demonstrate the need for changes at the Treasury Department, but he stopped short of saying that he would seek their resignations.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen, under fire from Republicans over his department's conduct in the Whitewater affair, said Sunday an internal government review found no evidence that either he or his senior aides violated ethics rules in their contacts with the White House about a criminal investigation affecting the President and Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | From Associated Press
Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen asked his agency's independent investigator last weekend for copies of interviews from an ongoing ethics review of the Clinton Administration's handling of Whitewater, officials said Saturday. Bentsen, who ordered the review and was among those interviewed, forwarded the Treasury inspector general's documents to the White House so it could prepare for congressional hearings, the Administration officials said.
NEWS
April 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ross Perot told a Washington radio call-in audience that he would not consider running for President if Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen were in the race. Perot, a billionaire businessman also from Texas, was asked about political contributions he has made over the years, including donations to Bentsen, who chairs the Senate Finance Committee and was a Democratic vice presidential candidate in 1988.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bentsen Stumps for NAFTA: Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen, launching the Clinton Administration's campaign for passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement, told a meeting of business leaders in downtown Los Angeles that the proposed pact would create 200,000 jobs across the country over the next two years by expanding demand for American goods in Mexico, Canada and the Pacific Rim. Bentsen predicted the measure will win congressional approval this fall and be in place by 1994.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen issued a strong defense of the dollar Tuesday and said the Clinton Administration has no interest in seeing its value fall, but his remarks were virtually ignored in early trading today in Tokyo. Even though it was the Clinton Adminstration's most forceful statement yet on the current turmoil in the currency markets, the dollar fell in Japan to touch a new global postwar low of 99.10 yen before closing the morning at 99.37 yen.
NEWS
May 2, 1994 | from Times Wire Services
Without the Clinton Administration-backed ban on assault weapons, ducks are better protected than people, Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen said Sunday. But the head of the National Rifle Assn. said President Clinton does not understand guns. The NRA's Wayne LaPierre took issue with Clinton's distinction between hunting rifles and the assault weapons that Clinton says are designed for battle and should be outlawed.
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