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Lloyd E Cotsen

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BUSINESS
August 23, 1994 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lloyd E. Cotsen sometimes refers to himself simply as a "soap salesman," a description modest by many degrees. He has lived a life of privilege and culture, residing in the toniest Westside neighborhoods and supporting the arts with a modesty often lacking in the area's entertainment-driven philanthropic community. He's a successful executive who has been known to leave the cares of business behind for an archeological field trip to Greece or the Mideast. He's rich.
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BUSINESS
August 23, 1994 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lloyd E. Cotsen sometimes refers to himself simply as a "soap salesman," a description modest by many degrees. He has lived a life of privilege and culture, residing in the toniest Westside neighborhoods and supporting the arts with a modesty often lacking in the area's entertainment-driven philanthropic community. He's a successful executive who has been known to leave the cares of business behind for an archeological field trip to Greece or the Mideast. He's rich.
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BUSINESS
July 19, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA
William S. Ripley III has been named to the newly created position of president and chief operating officer of the U.S. division of Neutrogena. Lloyd E. Cotsen, 59, continues as president and chief executive officer of the parent company, a Los Angeles maker of specialty skin-care products. Christian Bardin, 49, remains as president of Neutrogena's international division.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2004 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
The J. Paul Getty Trust is a cultural and philanthropic institution devoted to the arts. The 13-member Getty board of trustees meets quarterly; trustees are unpaid. Among their duties: approving acquisitions of artworks costing more than $5 million. New trustees are nominated by a governance committee that includes board members Lloyd E. Cotsen, Ronald W. Burkle, Ramon C. Cortines, Agnes Gund and Blenda J. Wilson. The full board elects trustees.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1994 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aiming to broaden its offerings in the skin care business, Johnson & Johnson said Monday that it will pay a premium price of $924.1 million to acquire Neutrogena, the maker of premium-priced soaps, shampoos and other beauty products. A deal had been widely expected after Los Angeles-based Neutrogena said earlier this month it was holding buyout talks with a "substantially larger" company. Johnson & Johnson will pay $35.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1988
Like many of my friends, I am more than disturbed by the "Who-is-a-Jew" issue that is wracking Israel and the politicizing of a religious point of few--to the extent of imposing the will of a few on the Jewish community at large. In the past two years, the position of Israel in the world and with its strongest ally has eroded. This issue is only contributing to that erosion, but in a more critical way by alienating American Jewish support, which Israel can ill afford. Israel should not take American political support for granted.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Companies that reward chief executives with big stock grants consistently create greater share value for investors than firms that do not, says the annual executive compensation study released Wednesday by the United Shareholders Assn. The study was conducted for the Washington-based shareholders' rights group by Harvard Business School professor Kevin J. Murphy, an executive-pay specialist, who analyzed data gathered from 1,000 of the nation's largest corporations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1991 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Business executives who earned top dollar in the South Bay last year generally were purveyors of distinctively late-20th-Century products. A Times survey shows that the executives with publicly owned firms who received the region's highest pay usually earned the big bucks by inventing, manufacturing, distributing or disposing of such items as computers and food supplements, vitamins and space ships, semiconductors and hazardous waste.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1994 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Neutrogena Corp., which turned a line of transparent soap bars into a multimillion-dollar skin and hair care products business, said Wednesday that it is negotiating a possible sale of the firm. Los Angeles-based Neutrogena revealed the talks with what it described as a "substantially larger company" after its once-languishing stock rose as high as $23 in heavy Nasdaq trading Wednesday. The stock, which traded as low as $16 earlier this year, closed up 87.5 cents at $21.625.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
If Lloyd E. Cotsen had gotten there a couple of years earlier, Neutrogena's phenomenal corporate success story might never have taken place. "I was right out of Harvard Business School and I knew you didn't go into the soap business," said Cotsen, who started at the company in 1957 after marrying the founder's daughter. Then called Natone Products, the firm made lip brushes and other consumer products out of a small Los Angeles plant.
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