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Lloyd E Reuss

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BUSINESS
March 19, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp. is recommending that all its cars--new vehicles and those already on the road--use cleaner-burning "reformulated" gasolines to help the environment, GM President Lloyd E. Reuss told oil refiners Monday. GM's endorsement of the new gasolines--now offered by most major oil companies in one form or another--is apparently intended to help create a bigger market for the fuel.
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BUSINESS
April 7, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The board of General Motors Corp. abruptly ousted the company's president as well as its chief financial officer in an unprecedented shake-up that reflects the deep woes confronting the world's largest industrial corporation. Meeting in Dallas, GM's board also moved to take a more prominent role in overseeing the corporation by installing an outside director as head of the board's executive committee in place of Chairman Robert C. Stempel. After less than two years on the job, Lloyd E.
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BUSINESS
May 23, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Robert C. Stempel, an engineer with a strong background in manufacturing and product development, was named president of General Motors on Friday, ending a lengthy, neck-and-neck competition among a handful of top GM executives. GM Chairman Roger B. Smith announced at a press conference following GM's annual meeting that the 53-year-old Stempel had been elected to the No. 2 spot in the world's largest corporation by the board of directors Friday afternoon. He succeeds President F.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp. is recommending that all its cars--new vehicles and those already on the road--use cleaner-burning "reformulated" gasolines to help the environment, GM President Lloyd E. Reuss told oil refiners Monday. GM's endorsement of the new gasolines--now offered by most major oil companies in one form or another--is apparently intended to help create a bigger market for the fuel.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The board of General Motors Corp. abruptly ousted the company's president as well as its chief financial officer in an unprecedented shake-up that reflects the deep woes confronting the world's largest industrial corporation. Meeting in Dallas, GM's board also moved to take a more prominent role in overseeing the corporation by installing an outside director as head of the board's executive committee in place of Chairman Robert C. Stempel. After less than two years on the job, Lloyd E.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1990 | FROM TIMES WIRE SERVICES
General Motors Corp. said today that it is maintaining its 1990 U.S. auto industry sales projection of 14.7 million vehicles despite the potentially ominous consequences of the current Middle East crisis. GM President Lloyd E. Reuss told reporters the company was still projecting that U.S. auto makers will produce between 14.7 million and 14.8 million cars and trucks this year. But he conceded that the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and the subsequent rise in oil prices could affect GM's product mix.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The ceremonial first Saturn automobile was driven off the Spring Hill assembly line today by Roger Smith, the retiring chairman of General Motors Corp., the auto maker announced. In a ceremony that was closed to the news media, Smith drove the car off the line at 10:57 a.m., accompanied in the metallic red, four-door "Job One" sedan by Owen Bieber, president of the United Auto Workers. Smith, whose retires Tuesday, was followed in "Job Two" by incoming GM Chairman Robert Stempel.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1990
General Motors Corp. on Thursday announced an "aggressive pricing strategy and warranty package" for its long-awaited Saturn compact cars, with base prices for the new line starting at $7,995 and ranging up to $11,775 for a sporty, two-door coupe. The least expensive model, a four-door sedan, will get 37 miles per gallon of gasoline in highway driving and 27 miles per gallon in the city, GM said.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1991 | From Associated Press
Toyota Motor Corp., Japan's largest auto maker, is ready to consider selling U.S. cars in Japan if such a request is made, a company official said Wednesday. Kimiaki Kuroki said the company already is negotiating with Volkswagen AG of Germany about selling its cars in Japan. "We are basically ready to consider the selling of U.S. cars in Japan as well if this is proposed by any U.S. auto maker," Kuroki said. He said, however, that no U.S. auto maker has made such a request.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1986 | JAMES RISEN
General Motors reshuffled virtually its entire top management structure below the level of chairman and president in a series of rapid-fire promotions made public Monday. After announcing that Alexander A. Cunningham, 60, executive vice president for North American automotive operations, would be leaving for health reasons, GM said Lloyd E. Reuss and Robert C. Stempel would become executive vice presidents and members of the board of directors.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Robert C. Stempel, an engineer with a strong background in manufacturing and product development, was named president of General Motors on Friday, ending a lengthy, neck-and-neck competition among a handful of top GM executives. GM Chairman Roger B. Smith announced at a press conference following GM's annual meeting that the 53-year-old Stempel had been elected to the No. 2 spot in the world's largest corporation by the board of directors Friday afternoon. He succeeds President F.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
General Motors Corp. President and Chief Operating Officer Robert C. Stempel, who rose through the production ranks of the world's largest auto maker, was named today to succeed the retiring Roger B. Smith as chairman. Smith, who steps down July 31 at age 65, announced Stempel's selection at a news conference at GM headquarters. Lloyd E. Reuss, a GM executive vice president, will succeed Stempel as president. The position of chief operating officer, also held by Stempel, is being eliminated.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1990 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reaching out to the ethnic communities that make up a growing share of its market, General Motors Corp. said Tuesday that it plans to increase the ranks of its minority dealers by 40% over the next three years. "Increased minority participation in our dealerships is vital to achieving GM's prime objective of the 1990s--satisfying car and truck owners better than any other manufacturer," GM President Lloyd E.
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