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Lloyd Kaufman

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May 23, 1999 | AMY WALLACE, Amy Wallace is a Times staff writer
When Lloyd Kaufman, the gross-out indie movie mogul who first put Kevin Costner and Billy Bob Thornton up on the big screen, strolls the Croissette promenade here at the Cannes Film Festival, he turns a lot of heads.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Robert Abele
The gurgling caldron of Z-grade schlock that has always been outlier film company Troma's point of pride is on full display in the vigorously offensive comedy "Return to Nuke 'Em High Volume 1. " Part sequel, part update and, well, part part - Volume 2 is to come - this movie revisits the environmental satire of Troma's 1986 "Class of Nuke 'Em High," but replaces that era's nuclear hazard riffing with modern-day fears about contaminated food....
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Robert Abele
The gurgling caldron of Z-grade schlock that has always been outlier film company Troma's point of pride is on full display in the vigorously offensive comedy "Return to Nuke 'Em High Volume 1. " Part sequel, part update and, well, part part - Volume 2 is to come - this movie revisits the environmental satire of Troma's 1986 "Class of Nuke 'Em High," but replaces that era's nuclear hazard riffing with modern-day fears about contaminated food....
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2006 | David Ehrenstein, Special to The Times
The Toxic Avenger The Novel Lloyd Kaufman and Adam Jahnke Thunder's Mouth Press: 274 pp., $13.95 paper * "THIS is not a novelization," Lloyd Kaufman and Adam Jahnke blandly declare on the second page of this novelization. Yes, they're being facetious, for this denial echoes "This is not a pipe," which Rene Magritte famously printed underneath his painting of a pipe. No, Kaufman and Jahnke aren't surrealists. But it's clear they would appreciate the attribution.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Terror Firmer" marks the 25th anniversary of New York-based Troma Films, famed for its amusing and gory low-budget schlock. For the occasion, Troma has pulled out all the stops, which means there's more entrails, more bare bosoms, more R-rated sex, more flatulence, more mayhem, more brutality and more violence. But it adds up to less and less. After a quarter of a century, the tried and true Troma formula is beginning to wear thin.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1994 | KENNETH TURAN, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic. and
Sitting on the terrace of the Carlton Hotel, his lime green pants and lavender socks resplendent in the morning sun, Lloyd Kaufman president of Troma Films, casts a benevolent eye on Margot Hope, the fetching writer-producer-director and star of Troma's latest extravaganza, "Femme Fontaine: Killer Babe for the CIA." "Margot," he says, searching for just the right way to be nice, "your film is much too good for the American Cinematheque retrospective."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2006 | David Ehrenstein, Special to The Times
The Toxic Avenger The Novel Lloyd Kaufman and Adam Jahnke Thunder's Mouth Press: 274 pp., $13.95 paper * "THIS is not a novelization," Lloyd Kaufman and Adam Jahnke blandly declare on the second page of this novelization. Yes, they're being facetious, for this denial echoes "This is not a pipe," which Rene Magritte famously printed underneath his painting of a pipe. No, Kaufman and Jahnke aren't surrealists. But it's clear they would appreciate the attribution.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Class of Nuke 'Em High Part 2: Subhumanoid Meltdown" (at the Vista, Hollywood, and Peppertree, Northridge) finds the Troma Team, those zany low-budget producers Lloyd Kaufman, Michael Herz and their cohorts, in top form. Lots of filmmakers try to get laughs out of genre spoofs featuring bosomy babes and cheap special effects, but the Troma people have more smarts than their competitors and understand (most of the time) that mayhem must proceed with some form of crazed logic.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1993
Pamela A. Pickering was elected as the first female chairman and chief executive of the 14-year-old American Film Marketing Assn. Pickering, vice president of international distribution at Republic Pictures International, defeated Lloyd Kaufman with 68% of the vote. She replaces Michael Goldman, who completed his two-year term. The association is made up of 105 independent film companies that produce, finance and license films internationally.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Terror Firmer" marks the 25th anniversary of New York-based Troma Films, famed for its amusing and gory low-budget schlock. For the occasion, Troma has pulled out all the stops, which means there's more entrails, more bare bosoms, more R-rated sex, more flatulence, more mayhem, more brutality and more violence. But it adds up to less and less. After a quarter of a century, the tried and true Troma formula is beginning to wear thin.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1999 | AMY WALLACE, Amy Wallace is a Times staff writer
When Lloyd Kaufman, the gross-out indie movie mogul who first put Kevin Costner and Billy Bob Thornton up on the big screen, strolls the Croissette promenade here at the Cannes Film Festival, he turns a lot of heads.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1994 | KENNETH TURAN, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic. and
Sitting on the terrace of the Carlton Hotel, his lime green pants and lavender socks resplendent in the morning sun, Lloyd Kaufman president of Troma Films, casts a benevolent eye on Margot Hope, the fetching writer-producer-director and star of Troma's latest extravaganza, "Femme Fontaine: Killer Babe for the CIA." "Margot," he says, searching for just the right way to be nice, "your film is much too good for the American Cinematheque retrospective."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999
Yet another L.A. Times article on Lloyd Kaufman's Troma Films ("Still Making Schlock-Waves in France," May 23). I've lost track of all the Troma articles and references the L.A. Times has bestowed upon this tiny and largely inconsequential film company. And for what reason? Mainly, I assume, because they are "colorful" and give good quotes and provide "photo ops." Never mind that, with the possible exception of "Def by Temptation" and "Chopper Chicks in Zombietown" (both released, but not produced, by Troma)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987 | John M. Wilson
Troma, the NYC-based ultra-low-budget movie company that gave us "Surf Nazis Must Die!" and other spoofs, isn't known for taste. But it may be grasping for a new low: It's shooting (in Upstate NY) what may be the first movie to feature AIDS in blatantly exploitive fashion. The film is "War!," about a group of Americans captured by terrorists when their plane crash-lands on an island "under Cuban rule."
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