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Lloyd M Pete Bucher

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May 28, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY
In 28 years of service to the military, retired Navy Cmdr. Lloyd (Pete) Bucher knew scores of men, many of whom died in the line of duty, many of whom would spend the rest of their lives coping with a wound or injury. Bucher fought in World War II, in Korea and in Vietnam, and he knew many men for whom the lasting scar of battle was the terror that war leaves in the mind.
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NEWS
February 16, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Crew members of the U.S. spy ship Pueblo, imprisoned and tortured by the North Koreans 23 years ago, have been awarded lifetime passes to major league baseball games, ending what their captain, Lloyd (Pete) Bucher, had long considered a slight. "It always stuck in my craw that returning Vietnam POWs were issued lifetime passes and we were not," Bucher, a retired Navy commander, said Friday at his home in Poway, Calif.
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NEWS
February 16, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Crew members of the U.S. spy ship Pueblo, imprisoned and tortured by the North Koreans 23 years ago, have been awarded lifetime passes to major league baseball games, ending what their captain, Lloyd (Pete) Bucher, had long considered a slight. "It always stuck in my craw that returning Vietnam POWs were issued lifetime passes and we were not," Bucher, a retired Navy commander, said Friday at his home in Poway, Calif.
NEWS
May 28, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY
In 28 years of service to the military, retired Navy Cmdr. Lloyd (Pete) Bucher knew scores of men, many of whom died in the line of duty, many of whom would spend the rest of their lives coping with a wound or injury. Bucher fought in World War II, in Korea and in Vietnam, and he knew many men for whom the lasting scar of battle was the terror that war leaves in the mind.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 22 years after the fact and required a special act of Congress, but the U.S. Navy on Saturday awarded Prisoner of War medals to 63 officers and crew members of the spy ship Pueblo who were held by North Korea for 11 months in 1968. "The fact that this has finally been done fills me with great joy," said Lloyd (Pete) Bucher, the retired commander of the Pueblo, which was attacked and seized in international waters by a North Korean force on Jan. 23, 1968.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They beat Pete Bucher with gun butts. They kicked him with their boots. They threw him into walls. "Sonabitchi criminal!" they yelled. "Goddamned liar! Spydog!" They forced him to his knees. One put a pistol to his ear and cocked it. "Two minutes to sign, sonabitchi!" Quietly, he said: "I love you, Rose." He said it again. "I love you, Rose . . . " The pistol clicked. A ploy, Pete Bucher realized, and he regained some composure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1990 | YOLANDA RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crew of the Pueblo will receive medals recognizing them as prisoners of war 22 years after their Navy intelligence-gathering ship was captured by North Korea, it was announced Tuesday. Pat Shelley, a San Diego spokesman for the Department of Veterans Affairs, said the ceremony will correct a Pentagon administrator's ruling in 1988 that said the 82 crewmen of the spy ship failed to qualify as POWs even though they were held by North Korea for 11 months.
NEWS
March 30, 2003 | Colleen Long, Associated Press Writer
The growing crisis in North Korea opens old wounds for Al Plucker. Thirty-five years ago, Plucker was a young navigator aboard the USS Pueblo when it was captured off the coast of North Korea. Plucker and his crewmates were tortured and humiliated during 11 months in captivity before they were released.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 22 years after the fact and required a special act of Congress, but the U.S. Navy on Saturday awarded Prisoner of War medals to 63 officers and crew members of the spy ship Pueblo who were held by North Korea for 11 months in 1968. "The fact that this has finally been done fills me with great joy," said Lloyd (Pete) Bucher, the retired commander of the Pueblo, which was attacked and seized in international waters by a North Korean force on Jan. 23, 1968.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They beat Pete Bucher with gun butts. They kicked him with their boots. They threw him into walls. "Sonabitchi criminal!" they yelled. "Goddamned liar! Spydog!" They forced him to his knees. One put a pistol to his ear and cocked it. "Two minutes to sign, sonabitchi!" Quietly, he said: "I love you, Rose." He said it again. "I love you, Rose . . . " The pistol clicked. A ploy, Pete Bucher realized, and he regained some composure.
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