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Lloyd Richards

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2006 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Lloyd Richards, the stage director who helped launch Lorraine Hansberry and August Wilson into the playwriting pantheon, revolutionizing not only black theater but the entire way in which new American drama is shepherded from first draft to polished premiere, has died.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Two men living decades apart have two key things in common: They lived in Los Angeles, and they were two of the funniest men ever. Harold Lloyd was one of the great silent clowns, and 1923's “Safety Last” was one of his classic roles, the source of one of the best-known images from the entire silent-film era: Lloyd dangling above the Los Angeles skyline, hanging from the hands of an enormous clock. The Criterion Collection provides a newly restored version of “Safety Last!” as well as numerous extras, including a documentary (“The Third Genius”)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1989 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Soon after Lloyd Richards settled into his new jobs as Dean of the Yale School of Drama and artistic director of the Yale Repertory Theatre in 1979, he got a call from his old acting buddy, James Earl Jones. "He congratulated me on my appointment," recalls Richards, "but I said, 'It doesn't end there. If I go to Yale, you go, too. As do a few other people.' " Richards wasn't joking. Jones played in Shakespeare's "Timon of Athens," put Richards in touch with Athol Fugard, then appeared in Yale's American premiere of Fugard's "A Lesson From Aloes."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Among the pleasures of seeing an August Wilson play, it's often said, is just listening to the people talk. As Los Angeles Times theater critic Charles McNulty has noted, Wilson stocks his scripts with "natural raconteurs" and lets them soar in "verbal arias" full of earthy poetry. In that sense, a recent dinner break interview with Keith David, John Douglas Thompson and Glynn Turman was more or less an extension of what they'd been doing in rehearsals for the Mark Taper Forum's revival of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1991 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lloyd Richards is at a crossroads. The esteemed director is in San Diego this week, directing "Two Trains Running," the latest play by two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner August Wilson, that opened last night at the Old Globe Theatre. The future is a bit uncertain for Richards.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN
They are separated by a generation and a generous helping of social and educational differences. But these differences make the respect and admiration between the gentle academician in his 60s and the intense, chain-smoking high school dropout now in his 40s all the more striking. The match between director Lloyd Richards and playwright August Wilson is a winning one, as evidenced by the Tony Awards that the two received last year for "Fences," a Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway hit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN
Theater awards in this country don't make a lot of sense. One is aware that people have been saying this ever since "Oedipus the King" didn't get the prize at the Theatre of Dionysus. For the American theater, it happens to be the truth. Two news items brought the problem to mind. The first was the announcement that this year's Pulitzer Prize for drama had gone to August Wilson's "Fences." The second was an article about the Tony Awards broadcast, coming up June 10 on CBS.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
It's no surprise that James Earl Jones is a big man. Booming voice, imposing presence. But there's a gentleness too: in the eyes, in the handshake, in the offer of a cup of tea. James Earl Jones is almost . . . meek. It's not for lack of success.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Two men living decades apart have two key things in common: They lived in Los Angeles, and they were two of the funniest men ever. Harold Lloyd was one of the great silent clowns, and 1923's “Safety Last” was one of his classic roles, the source of one of the best-known images from the entire silent-film era: Lloyd dangling above the Los Angeles skyline, hanging from the hands of an enormous clock. The Criterion Collection provides a newly restored version of “Safety Last!” as well as numerous extras, including a documentary (“The Third Genius”)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Among the pleasures of seeing an August Wilson play, it's often said, is just listening to the people talk. As Los Angeles Times theater critic Charles McNulty has noted, Wilson stocks his scripts with "natural raconteurs" and lets them soar in "verbal arias" full of earthy poetry. In that sense, a recent dinner break interview with Keith David, John Douglas Thompson and Glynn Turman was more or less an extension of what they'd been doing in rehearsals for the Mark Taper Forum's revival of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2006 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Lloyd Richards, the stage director who helped launch Lorraine Hansberry and August Wilson into the playwriting pantheon, revolutionizing not only black theater but the entire way in which new American drama is shepherded from first draft to polished premiere, has died.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1991 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lloyd Richards is at a crossroads. The esteemed director is in San Diego this week, directing "Two Trains Running," the latest play by two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner August Wilson, that opened last night at the Old Globe Theatre. The future is a bit uncertain for Richards.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1989 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Soon after Lloyd Richards settled into his new jobs as Dean of the Yale School of Drama and artistic director of the Yale Repertory Theatre in 1979, he got a call from his old acting buddy, James Earl Jones. "He congratulated me on my appointment," recalls Richards, "but I said, 'It doesn't end there. If I go to Yale, you go, too. As do a few other people.' " Richards wasn't joking. Jones played in Shakespeare's "Timon of Athens," put Richards in touch with Athol Fugard, then appeared in Yale's American premiere of Fugard's "A Lesson From Aloes."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
It's no surprise that James Earl Jones is a big man. Booming voice, imposing presence. But there's a gentleness too: in the eyes, in the handshake, in the offer of a cup of tea. James Earl Jones is almost . . . meek. It's not for lack of success.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN
They are separated by a generation and a generous helping of social and educational differences. But these differences make the respect and admiration between the gentle academician in his 60s and the intense, chain-smoking high school dropout now in his 40s all the more striking. The match between director Lloyd Richards and playwright August Wilson is a winning one, as evidenced by the Tony Awards that the two received last year for "Fences," a Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway hit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN
Theater awards in this country don't make a lot of sense. One is aware that people have been saying this ever since "Oedipus the King" didn't get the prize at the Theatre of Dionysus. For the American theater, it happens to be the truth. Two news items brought the problem to mind. The first was the announcement that this year's Pulitzer Prize for drama had gone to August Wilson's "Fences." The second was an article about the Tony Awards broadcast, coming up June 10 on CBS.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Going, Going: Lloyd Richards, dean of the Yale School of Drama and artistic director of the Yale Repertory Theatre since 1979, will leave both posts in June, 1991. The announcement was made Sunday by Benno C. Schmidt Jr., president of Yale University, who added that a faculty committee has been appointed to search for a successor. Richards, whose staging of August Wilson's "The Piano Lesson" is at the Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood, brought Wilson's work to national prominence while at Yale.
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