Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLloyd Rigler
IN THE NEWS

Lloyd Rigler

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1995 | Barbara Isenberg, Barbara Isenberg is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Back in 1949, when a food critic showed no interest in Adolph's seasonings, executive Lloyd Rigler turned up at her office with a chunk of meat, plopped it on her desk, tenderized it and told her to take it home and cook it. She did, and her resulting story led to nearly 4,000 requests for the new product. Rigler, who turned stunts like that into a major fortune, is now applying his on-site hustle to Culture with a capital C.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 14, 2003
Re "Lloyd E. Rigler, 88; He Made Fortune on Meat Tenderizer," obituary, Dec. 12: I was saddened to read of Lloyd Rigler's passing. Lloyd was very outspoken on things he was passionate about, and he put his financial support into those areas as well. One such area was support of access for the hearing-impaired, which included Lloyd himself. He provided funding for public television station KCET to have its own facility and staff for closed captioning of local programming. He also provided the funds for KCET's first stereo transmitter system, feeling that this not only enhanced the experience of classical music for all but that it would help many with hearing impairments.
Advertisement
OPINION
December 14, 2003
Re "Lloyd E. Rigler, 88; He Made Fortune on Meat Tenderizer," obituary, Dec. 12: I was saddened to read of Lloyd Rigler's passing. Lloyd was very outspoken on things he was passionate about, and he put his financial support into those areas as well. One such area was support of access for the hearing-impaired, which included Lloyd himself. He provided funding for public television station KCET to have its own facility and staff for closed captioning of local programming. He also provided the funds for KCET's first stereo transmitter system, feeling that this not only enhanced the experience of classical music for all but that it would help many with hearing impairments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Lloyd E. Rigler, an entrepreneur and philanthropist who made his fortune selling Adolph's Meat Tenderizer and became a major patron of the arts and a founding donor to the Los Angeles Music Center, has died. He was 88. Rigler died of cancer Sunday at his home in Hollywood, according to Steven Davis, a close friend. After selling his meat seasoning business in 1974, Rigler began to spend more of his time sponsoring the arts through a foundation he set up with his business partner, Lawrence E.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1995
Barbara Isenberg failed to mention one significant grant to the musical education of Angelenos in her excellent article on Lloyd Rigler and the Ledler Foundation's generosity to the arts ("A Satellite to Save the Arts," July 16): one to the art and music department at the Los Angeles Public Library following the devastating fire at the Central Library on Sept. 3, 1986 that fundamentally destroyed the circulating music collection. Since Lawrence Deutsch, Mr. Rigler's late partner, had a particular interest in opera, this grant is designed to build an opera collection, with special emphasis on full opera scores to match the collection of full orchestral scores, one of the capstones of the Central Library collections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Lloyd E. Rigler, an entrepreneur and philanthropist who made his fortune selling Adolph's Meat Tenderizer and became a major patron of the arts and a founding donor to the Los Angeles Music Center, has died. He was 88. Rigler died of cancer Sunday at his home in Hollywood, according to Steven Davis, a close friend. After selling his meat seasoning business in 1974, Rigler began to spend more of his time sponsoring the arts through a foundation he set up with his business partner, Lawrence E.
NEWS
December 16, 2003
Rigler obituary -- The obituary of entrepreneur and philanthropist Lloyd E. Rigler in Friday's California section spelled the name of his surviving sister as Andre Estrin. In fact, her name is Audre Estrin.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2002
The American Cinematheque presents its fourth annual "Women in Shorts" program, an evening of films featuring female protagonists and directors, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Co-presented with the organization Women in Film, the event includes short films on topics ranging from sex and romance to power struggles and racial issues. A question-and-answer session follows the screening at the Lloyd E. Rigler Theatre at the Egyptian, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood. Information: (323) 466-FILM.
NEWS
January 13, 2005 | Patrick Day
Back in the days before computers blessed even late-night TV commercials with loads of snazzy visuals, Ray Harryhausen created magic the old-fashioned way: by hand, frame by frame. His stop-motion animated effects of sword-fighting skeletons and lumbering giants are among cinema's most memorable images.
NEWS
January 27, 2005 | Patrick Day
In 1972, "Deep Throat," a pornographic movie shot for $25,000, was released into the middle of a cultural revolution, sparking a fiery controversy and making more than $600 million -- perhaps the first porno ever to cross over into mainstream success. Filmmakers Fenton Bailey and Randy Barbato look at the film's legacy with "Inside Deep Throat," a documentary produced by Oscar-winner Brian Grazer. OutFest hosts a preview of the film ahead of its Feb. 11 release date. * Patrick Day * Lloyd E.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1995
Barbara Isenberg failed to mention one significant grant to the musical education of Angelenos in her excellent article on Lloyd Rigler and the Ledler Foundation's generosity to the arts ("A Satellite to Save the Arts," July 16): one to the art and music department at the Los Angeles Public Library following the devastating fire at the Central Library on Sept. 3, 1986 that fundamentally destroyed the circulating music collection. Since Lawrence Deutsch, Mr. Rigler's late partner, had a particular interest in opera, this grant is designed to build an opera collection, with special emphasis on full opera scores to match the collection of full orchestral scores, one of the capstones of the Central Library collections.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1995 | Barbara Isenberg, Barbara Isenberg is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Back in 1949, when a food critic showed no interest in Adolph's seasonings, executive Lloyd Rigler turned up at her office with a chunk of meat, plopped it on her desk, tenderized it and told her to take it home and cook it. She did, and her resulting story led to nearly 4,000 requests for the new product. Rigler, who turned stunts like that into a major fortune, is now applying his on-site hustle to Culture with a capital C.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1995
I am grateful for the story on my Classic Arts Showcase ("A Satellite to Save the Arts," by Barbara Isenberg, July 16). Credit is also due to the record companies who supply our programming: BMG Classics, Criterion Collection/The Voyager Co., Sony Classical, Deutsche Grammophon, EMI/Angel, Kultur, Lumivision, PolyGram, Teldec/Elektra International Classics, Video Artists International and independent producers. In addition, the unions related to the creation of the programming--AFTRA, AFM, IATSE, WGA and SAG--granted Classic Arts Showcase a waiver to add two minutes to the three minutes of promotion rights passed on to us from the recording companies.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1998
Earlier this month, The Times printed two stories by Mark Swed on Placido Domingo taking over the L.A. Opera in the year 2000. Swed says that for more than 100 years Los Angeles had been an operatic Wild West served by itinerants like New York City Opera. He did not do his research. When I first arrived in L.A. in 1941, opera was performed annually at the Shrine Auditorium under the auspices of the L.A. Philharmonic, who brought the San Francisco Opera here with international stars every year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|