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NEWS
January 14, 1990 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These days, they're all trying to hop aboard this train. In traffic-choked Orange County, a proposal to build an 18-mile monorail line through the heart of the region has normally staid politicos and bureaucrats abuzz with anticipation. The cities of Fullerton and Huntington Beach have been clamoring in recent weeks to join five central Orange County cities that have already started a push for the futuristic transportation system.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2010 | By Jean Merl
In choosing Orange County Supervisor Chris Norby for a vacant state Assembly seat, voters got a homegrown leader whose views on limiting government play well in the Republican stronghold. As expected, the former teacher, who grew up in Fullerton and served on its City Council before his 2002 upset election to the county Board of Supervisors, coasted to an easy victory in Tuesday's special runoff election, capturing 63% of the vote. Democrat John MacMurray won 31% and Jane Rands of the Green Party garnered 6%. "I have deep roots in the district," Norby said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1996 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two Los Angeles County cities are betting that new card clubs opening in their towns this year will haul in millions of dollars to their cash-strapped coffers. But before Compton and Hawaiian Gardens start making a wish list of how to spend their millions, they should talk to some of their neighbors that already have gambling. Most Los Angeles-area cities with casinos have seen revenues fall off in recent years, leaving sudden, gaping holes in their budgets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2001 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a year where California counties already are struggling from increased energy costs and a softening economy, bioterrorism preparedness could drain an additional $80 million from the coffers of those governments, which supply most of the social services used by poor people and others.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When California county governments first began imposing a controversial jail-booking fee on cities last year, they knew that city officials were going to object, that lawsuits were possible and protests inevitable. But Sacramento had just taken away millions of dollars in county aid, and the local governments desperately needed the money. So, almost without exception, they swallowed hard and adopted the fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2001 | MATT SURMAN and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a decision involving a Ventura Harbor marina development bankruptcy, the state Supreme Court said Thursday that local governments cannot be forced to pay for lawsuit settlements by raising property taxes. Taxpayer advocates praised the decision, saying that a ruling favorable to the Ventura Port District's creditors would have paved the way for tax increases statewide and virtually overturned portions of Proposition 13, which limits property tax increases.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Federal regulators are near an agreement that would protect municipal bondholders from losing their tax exemption in "yield-burning" cases and make brokerages that allegedly cheated the federal Treasury liable for lost tax revenue. The Securities and Exchange Commission is examining at least half a dozen brokerages in its probe of possible yield burning--when brokerages allegedly overcharged states or cities for securities used in municipal refinancings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1998 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top county, school and union leaders on Friday renewed their sharp criticism of Gov. Pete Wilson's push to slash the state's vehicle license fee, which they say will devastate funding for schools and local government services. Wilson is pursuing a "car tax" cut, which would reduce the average $185 fee motorists pay each year to register their cars, in the midst of a $4.4-billion state budget surplus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1997 | KEN ELLINGWOOD and DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Local tax measures in several Los Angeles County communities appeared to be surviving the first big test of two newly implemented tax limitation laws that give the state's voters greater power over local levies. Voters in Bellflower, Paramount and South Pasadena gave their blessing to taxes already being collected in those cities, with all votes counted in unofficial returns. And early results showed tax measures leading in Pasadena, Claremont, El Monte and Lakewood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ending a year of negotiations and uncertainty, the county and its 31 cities have agreed to fund an $80-million emergency communication system to replace an aging radio network described by law enforcement officials as dangerously obsolete. The new 800-megahertz system, which would link all police, fire and public works agencies in the county to one network, is considered crucial to coordinating emergency agencies as the region's population grows.
NEWS
April 9, 2001 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor John F. Street spent New Year's Day in jail. With 120 ministers in tow, he visited all four of the city's lockups, informing inmates that the time is coming when Philadelphia's congregations will reach out to help them as soon as they are freed. Beginning this week, Street's voice--on tape--will contact parents whose children are absent from school without an excuse.
NEWS
April 9, 2001 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
The PG&E bankruptcy protection filing Friday came only four days before the state's largest utility is to make $80 million in property tax payments to 49 California counties. In Northern California's remote Plumas County, this was especially bad news. Because of its large hydroelectric holdings, Pacific Gas & Electric is Plumas' largest taxpayer, accounting for about 18% of the county's $2.3-billion tax base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2001 | MATT SURMAN and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a decision involving a Ventura Harbor marina development bankruptcy, the state Supreme Court said Thursday that local governments cannot be forced to pay for lawsuit settlements by raising property taxes. Taxpayer advocates praised the decision, saying that a ruling favorable to the Ventura Port District's creditors would have paved the way for tax increases statewide and virtually overturned portions of Proposition 13, which limits property tax increases.
NEWS
January 22, 2001 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Gov. Gray Davis floated the idea of a back-to-school "sales tax holiday," he conjured up cozy images of working families holding on to hard-earned dollars as their children prepared for the new school year. Both retailers and conservative lawmakers voiced support for suspending sales taxes on clothing, shoes and computer sales over a three-day weekend in August.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Up and down the Golden State, these are fat and happy times. In Southern and Northern California and along the Central Coast, cities crow about falling unemployment rates and residents watch in wonder as their home values jump to the moon. Growth is a good thing. Here in California's big middle, stretching 400 miles long and 50 miles wide, it's a far different tale. The problem isn't a lack of growth.
NEWS
June 7, 1999 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Usually, Lake County can't afford to keep metal detectors in its courthouse. So after authorities put one outside a notorious murder trial recently, they got chills when it scared some people away. "What does that tell you?" asked Adam Ayala, the court administrator. "I'm sure some people are packing heat." Safety is not only a worry in the courthouse. The sheriff in this rustic resort community north of Napa Valley struggles to keep cops on the street too. Deputies get just $12 an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1998
City and school leaders from across the San Gabriel Valley on Monday protested proposals to cut or eliminate vehicle license fees that go to local government, warning that such cuts would severely reduce services. Local elected officials called on Gov. Pete Wilson and Assemblyman Tom McClintock (R-Northridge) to abandon the proposals to eliminate or reduce the per-car tax by as much as 75%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1998 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top county, school and union leaders on Friday renewed their sharp criticism of Gov. Pete Wilson's push to slash the state's vehicle license fee, which they say will devastate funding for schools and local government services. Wilson is pursuing a "car tax" cut, which would reduce the average $185 fee motorists pay each year to register their cars, in the midst of a $4.4-billion state budget surplus.
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