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June 22, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ruling that could allow cities and towns to ban the use of pesticides and lawn-care chemicals, the Supreme Court said Friday that the federal pesticide law does not prohibit local communities from enacting stricter regulations on their own. The town of Casey, Wis., population 404, has the authority to enact an ordinance forbidding homeowners to spray herbicides on their property, the justices said.
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NEWS
June 22, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ruling that could allow cities and towns to ban the use of pesticides and lawn-care chemicals, the Supreme Court said Friday that the federal pesticide law does not prohibit local communities from enacting stricter regulations on their own. The town of Casey, Wis., population 404, has the authority to enact an ordinance forbidding homeowners to spray herbicides on their property, the justices said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO
A state commission charged with suggesting reforms to local government laws recommended Friday that the state pay most of the cost of studying San Fernando Valley secession from Los Angeles. After a lengthy debate, the Commission on Local Governance for the 21st Century opted to recommend that the state Legislature create a revolving fund that would cover most of the cost of studying secession.
NEWS
February 26, 1986 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court, in a major victory for tenants and possibly other consumers, ruled today that cities may impose rent controls even without authorization by state legislatures. By an 8-1 vote, the justices said a Berkeley, Calif., rent control law does not violate federal antitrust law. The court rejected arguments by landlords that the local ordinance is a form of price-fixing conspiracy forbidden by the Sherman Antitrust Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan and San Fernando Valley secessionists disagree on countless issues, but on one they have found common ground: both believe someone else, the state of California, should shoulder the costs of studying Los Angeles' deconstruction. Now if only they could persuade enough state leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Reaching across Los Angeles, City Council members backing cityhood studies for the San Fernando Valley and the Harbor joined forces Tuesday to formally request that the city identify funds to help pay for the work. Councilmen Joel Wachs of Studio City and Rudy Svorinich Jr. of San Pedro moved that city officials report on the cost of potential studies of secession for the Valley, Harbor, Eastside and Westside, and report on potential funding sources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan denounced the San Fernando Valley secession movement Friday, asserting that the Valley would still be rebuilding from the 1994 Northridge earthquake if not for his efforts. "I and others lobbied to get tens of billions of dollars from the federal government to bring the Valley back, and in fact, we did," Riordan said. "We have a lot of pride. We brought the Valley back . . . much faster than San Francisco after the Loma Prieta earthquake."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing between San Fernando Valley secessionists and a public vote on what may be the largest municipal divorce in American history are nine people--members of a little-known commission whose most controversial actions typically involve enlarging sanitation and lighting districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine people stand between San Fernando Valley secessionists and a public vote on what may be the largest municipal divorce in American history--members of a little-known commission whose most controversial actions typically involve enlarging sanitation and lighting districts.
NEWS
September 5, 1997 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new federal court decision may accomplish what Proposition 209 has thus far failed to do--abolish a California law that shares billions of dollars in state contracts annually among women- and minority-owned businesses. The ruling Wednesday by the U.S.
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